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Hong Kong Zoological And Botanical Gardens
The Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Zoological and Botanical Gardens (Chinese: 香港動植物公園) is one of the oldest zoological and botanical centres in the world. It occupies an area of 5.6 hectares at Mid-levels, on the northern slope of Victoria Peak
Victoria Peak
in Hong Kong. Founded in 1864, its first stage had been opened to the public in 1871.[1] It is the oldest park in Hong Kong.[2] Similar to Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Park, Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Zoological and Botanical Gardens provides a natural environment and atmosphere in Central District
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Primates
A primate (/ˈpraɪmeɪt/ ( listen) PRY-mayt) is a mammal of the order Primates (Latin: "prime, first rank").[2][3] In taxonomy, primates include two distinct lineages, strepsirrhines and haplorhines.[1] Primates arose from ancestors that lived in the trees of tropical forests; many primate characteristics represent adaptations to life in this challenging environment. Most primate species remain at least partly arboreal. With the exception of humans, who inhabit every continent,[4] most primates live in tropical or subtropical regions of the Americas, Africa and Asia.[5] They range in typical size from Madame Berthe's mouse lemur, which weighs only 30 g (1 oz), to the eastern gorilla, weighing over 200 kg (440 lb)
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Bauhinia Purpurea
Phanera
Phanera
purpurea is a species of flowering plant in the family Fabaceae, native to South China
China
(which includes Hong Kong) and Southeast Asia. Common names include orchid tree,[4] purple bauhinia,[4] camel's foot,[4] butterfly tree,[4] and Hawaiian orchid tree.[citation needed]Contents1 Description 2 Cultivation 3 Traditional medicine 4 Chemistry 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] Phanera
Phanera
purpurea flower (Kaniar) in Hyderabad, India. Phanera
Phanera
purpurea is a small to medium-size deciduous tree growing to 17 feet (5.2 m) tall. The leaves are 10–20 centimetres (3.9–7.9 in) long and broad, rounded, and bilobed at the base and apex. The flowers are conspicuous, pink, and fragrant, with five petals. The fruit is a pod 30 centimetres (12 in) long, containing 12 to 16 seeds
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Magnolia Denudata
Magnolia
Magnolia
is a large genus of about 210[notes 1] flowering plant species in the subfamily Magnolioideae
Magnolioideae
of the family Magnoliaceae. It is named after French botanist Pierre Magnol. Magnolia
Magnolia
is an ancient genus. Appearing before bees did, the flowers are theorized to have evolved to encourage pollination by beetles. To avoid damage from pollinating beetles, the carpels of Magnolia
Magnolia
flowers are extremely tough.[1] Fossilised specimens of M
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Magnolia Liliiflora
Magnolia
Magnolia
liliiflora (variously known by many names, including Mulan magnolia, purple magnolia, red magnolia, lily magnolia, tulip magnolia, Jane magnolia and woody-orchid) is a small tree native to southwest China (in Sichuan
Sichuan
and Yunnan), but cultivated for centuries elsewhere in China and also Japan. It was first introduced to English-speaking countries from cultivated Japanese origins, and is thus also sometimes called Japanese magnolia, though it is not native to Japan
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Magnolia × Soulangeana
Magnolia
Magnolia
× soulangeana (saucer magnolia) is a hybrid plant in the genus Magnolia
Magnolia
and family Magnoliaceae. It is a deciduous tree with large, early-blooming flowers in various shades of white, pink, and purple. It is one of the most commonly used magnolias in horticulture, being widely planted in the British Isles, especially in the south of England; and in the United States, especially the east and west coasts.[2]Contents1 Hybrid Origin 2 Description 3 Cultivation 4 References 5 External linksHybrid Origin[edit] Magnolia
Magnolia
× soulangeana was initially bred by French plantsman Étienne Soulange-Bodin
Étienne Soulange-Bodin
(1774–1846), a retired cavalry officer in Napoleon's army, at his château de Fromont
Fromont
near Paris. He crossed Magnolia denudata
Magnolia denudata
with M
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Magnolia Grandiflora
Magnolia
Magnolia
grandiflora, commonly known as the southern magnolia or bull bay, is a tree of the family Magnoliaceae
Magnoliaceae
native to the southeastern United States, from coastal North Carolina
North Carolina
to central Florida, and west to East Texas. Reaching 27.5 m (90 ft) in height, it is a large, striking evergreen tree, with large dark green leaves up to 20 cm (7 3⁄4 in) long and 12 cm (4 3⁄4 in) wide, and large, white, fragrant flowers up to 30 cm (12 in) in diameter. Although endemic to the lowland subtropical forests on the Gulf and south Atlantic coastal plain, magnolia grandiflora is widely cultivated in warmer areas around the world
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Orchid
The Orchidaceae
Orchidaceae
are a diverse and widespread family of flowering plants, with blooms that are often colourful and fragrant, commonly known as the orchid family. Along with the Asteraceae, they are one of the two largest families of flowering plants. The Orchidaceae
Orchidaceae
have about 28,000 currently accepted species, distributed in about 763 genera.[2][3] The determination of which family is larger is still under debate, because verified data on the members of such enormous families are continually in flux. Regardless, the number of orchid species nearly equals the number of bony fishes and is more than twice the number of bird species, and about four times the number of mammal species
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Fern
A fern is a member of a group of vascular plants that reproduce via spores and have neither seeds nor flowers. They differ from mosses by being vascular, i.e., having specialized tissues that conduct water and nutrients, in having branched stems and in having life cycles in which the sporophyte is the dominant phase. Like other vascular plants, ferns have complex leaves called megaphylls, that are more complex than the microphylls of clubmosses. Most ferns are leptosporangiate ferns, sometimes referred to as true ferns
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Bromeliad
The Bromeliaceae
Bromeliaceae
(the bromeliads) are a family of monocot flowering plants of 51 genera and around 3475 known species[2] native mainly to the tropical Americas, with a few species found in the American subtropics and one in tropical west Africa, Pitcairnia
Pitcairnia
feliciana.[3] They are among the basal families within the Poales
Poales
and are the only family within the order that has septal nectaries and inferior ovaries.[4] These inferior ovaries characterize the Bromelioideae, a subfamily of the Bromeliaceae.[5] The family includes both epiphytes, such as Spanish moss
Spanish moss
( Tillandsia
Tillandsia
usneoides), and terrestrial species, such as the pineapple ( Ananas
Ananas
comosus). Many bromeliads are able to store water in a structure formed by their tightly-overlapping leaf bases
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Vine
A vine ( Latin
Latin
vīnea "grapevine", "vineyard", from vīnum "wine") in the narrowest sense is the grapevine (Vitis), and more generally, any plant with a growth habit of trailing or scandent (that is, climbing) stems, lianas or runners. The word also can refer to such stems or runners themselves, for instance when used in wicker work.[1][2] In parts of the world, the term "vine" applies almost exclusively to the grapevine,[3] while the term "climber" is used for all climbing plants.[4]Contents1 Growth forms1.1 Twining vines1.1.1 Direction of rotation2 Horticultural climbing plants2.1 Use as garden plants3 Example vine taxa 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksGrowth forms Vine
Vine
twining around a steel fixed ladderClimbing plant covering a chimneyCertain plants always grow as vines, while a few grow as vines only part of the time
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Arecaceae
The Arecaceae
Arecaceae
are a botanical family of perennial climbers, shrubs, acaules and trees commonly known as palm trees (owing to historical usage, the family is alternatively called Palmae).[3] They are flowering plants, a family in the monocot order Arecales. Currently 181 genera with around 2600 species are known,[4] most of them restricted to tropical and subtropical climates. Most palms are distinguished by their large, compound, evergreen leaves, known as fronds, arranged at the top of an unbranched stem. However, palms exhibit an enormous diversity in physical characteristics and inhabit nearly every type of habitat within their range, from rainforests to deserts. Palms are among the best known and most extensively cultivated plant families. They have been important to humans throughout much of history
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Bauhinia Variegata
Bauhinia
Bauhinia
variegata is a species of flowering plant in the family Fabaceae.[3] It is native to South Asia
South Asia
and Southeast Asia, from southern China, Burma, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Common names include orchid tree, camel's foot tree, kachnar and mountain-ebony.Contents1 Description 2 In cultivation 3 Gallery 4 Uses as food 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] It is a small to medium-sized tree growing to 10–12 metres (33–39 ft) tall, deciduous in the dry season. The leaves are 10–20 centimetres (3.9–7.9 in) obcordate shaped, long and broad, rounded, and bilobed at the base and apex. The flowers are conspicuous, bright pink or white, 8–12 centimetres (3.1–4.7 in) diameter, with five petals
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Camellia Euphlebia
Camellia
Camellia
euphlebia is a species of plant in the Theaceae
Theaceae
family. It is found in China
China
and Vietnam. It is threatened by habitat loss. References[edit]^ World Conservation Monitoring Centre 1998. Camellia
Camellia
euphlebia. 2006 IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 21 August 2007.Taxon identifiersWd: Q5025913 ARKive: camellia-euphlebia EoL: 2905892 FoC: 242309951 GBIF: 7313845 iNaturalist: 190203 IPNI: 829902-1 IUCN: 32326 NCBI: 447316 Plant
Plant
List: kew-2694548 Tropicos: 31600365This Theaceae
Theaceae
article is a stub
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Azalea
Azaleas /əˈzeɪliə/ are flowering shrubs in the genus Rhododendron, particularly the former sections Tsutsuji
Tsutsuji
(evergreen) and Pentanthera (deciduous). Azaleas bloom in spring, their flowers often lasting several weeks
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Rhododendron Simsii
Rhododendron
Rhododendron
simsii (杜鵑) is a rhododendron species native to East Asia, where it grows at altitudes of 500–2700 meters. It is a shrub that grows to 2 m in height, with leaves that are ovate, elliptic-ovate or obovate to oblanceolate, 1.5–5 by 0.5–3 cm in size. Flowers range from white to dark red. The species is common in Hong Kong. It is also distributed in Areas south of Yangtze
Yangtze
in China as well as in Vietnam and Thailand.[1] Its specific name commemorates John Sims (1749-1831) who was the first editor of "Magazine Botanique". [2] References[edit]" Rhododendron
Rhododendron
simsii", Planchon, Fl. Serres Jard. Eur. 9: 78. 1853–1854
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