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Homo Sacer
Homo sacer (Latin for "the sacred man" or "the accursed man") is a figure of Roman law: a person who is banned and may be killed by anybody, but may not be sacrificed in a religious ritual.[1] The meaning of the term sacer in Ancient Roman religion
Ancient Roman religion
is not fully congruent with the meaning it took after Christianization, and which was adopted into English as sacred. In early Roman religion sacer, much like the Hebrew קָדוֹש‬ qadoš, denotes anything "set apart" from common society and encompasses both the sense of "hallowed" and that of "cursed". This concept of the sacred is more in line with the Islamic notion of haram. The homo sacer could thus also simply mean a person expunged from society and deprived of all rights and all functions in civil religion
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Civil Death
Civil death (Latin: civiliter mortuus)[1] is the loss of all or almost all civil rights by a person due to a conviction for a felony or due to an act by the government of a country that results in the loss of civil rights. It is usually inflicted on persons convicted of crimes against the state or adults determined by a court to be legally incompetent because of mental disability.[2] In medieval Europe, felons lost all civil rights upon their conviction
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Persona Non Grata
In diplomacy, a persona non grata (Latin: "person not appreciated", plural: personae non gratae) is a foreign person whose entering or remaining in a particular country is prohibited by that country's government. Being so named is the most serious form of censure which a country can apply to foreign diplomats, who are otherwise protected by diplomatic immunity from arrest and other normal kinds of prosecution.Contents1 Diplomacy 2 Other usage 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDiplomacy[edit] Under Article 9 of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, a receiving state may "at any time and without having to explain its decision" declare any member of a diplomatic staff persona non grata. A person so declared is considered unacceptable and is usually recalled to his or her home nation
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Stateless Person
In International law a stateless person is someone who is "not considered as a national by any state under the operation of its law".[2] Some stateless persons are also refugees
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Unlawful Combatant
An unlawful combatant, illegal combatant or unprivileged combatant/belligerent is a person who directly engages in armed conflict in violation of the laws of war. An unlawful combatant may be detained or prosecuted under the domestic law of the detaining state for such action, subject to international treaties on justice and human rights.[1]Capture of a Franc-Tireur, by Carl Johann Lasch.The Geneva Conventions
Geneva Conventions
apply in wars between two or more sovereign states
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Sextus Pompeius Festus
Sextus Pompeius Festus, usually known simply as Festus, was a Roman grammarian who probably flourished in the later 2nd century AD, perhaps at Narbo (Narbonne) in Gaul.Contents1 Work 2 Manuscript 3 References3.1 Citations 3.2 Bibliography4 Further reading 5 External linksWork[edit] He made a 20-volume epitome of Verrius Flaccus's voluminous and encyclopedic treatise De Verborum Significatu. Flaccus had been a celebrated grammarian who flourished in the reign of Augustus. Festus gives the etymology as well as the meaning of many words, and his work throws considerable light on the language, mythology and antiquities of ancient Rome. He made a few alterations, and inserted some critical remarks of his own. He also omitted such ancient Latin
Latin
words as had long been obsolete; these he apparently discussed in a separate work now lost, entitled Priscorum verborum cum exemplis
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Hague Conventions (1899 And 1907)
The Hague
The Hague
Conventions of 1899 and 1907 are a series of international treaties and declarations negotiated at two international peace conferences at The Hague
The Hague
in the Netherlands. Along with the Geneva Conventions, the Hague Conventions were among the first formal statements of the laws of war and war crimes in the body of secular international law
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Dalit
Dalit, meaning "broken/scattered" in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Hindi, is a term mostly used for the castes in India that have been subjected to untouchability. Dalits were excluded from the four-fold varna system of Hinduism and were seen as forming a fifth varna, also known by the name of Panchama. The term dalits was in use as a translation for the British Raj
British Raj
census classification of Depressed Classes prior to 1935. It was popularised by the economist and reformer B. R. Ambedkar
B. R. Ambedkar
(1891–1956), himself a Dalit, and in the 1970s its use was invigorated when it was adopted by the Dalit Panthers
Dalit Panthers
activist group
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Stanford University Press
The Stanford University
Stanford University
Press (SUP) is the publishing house of Stanford University. In 1892, an independent publishing company was established at the university. The first use of the name "Stanford University Press" in a book's imprinting occurred in 1895. In 1917, the university bought the press, making it a division of Stanford. In 1999, the press became a division of the Stanford University Libraries
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Burakumin
Burakumin
Burakumin
(部落民, "hamlet people"/"village people", "those who live in hamlets/villages") is an outcaste group at the bottom of the Japanese social order that has historically been the victim of severe discrimination and ostracism. They were originally members of outcast communities in the Japanese feudal era, composed of those with occupations considered impure or tainted by death (such as executioners, undertakers, workers in slaughterhouses, butchers or tanners), which have severe social stigmas of kegare (穢れ or "defilement") attached to them
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Habeas Corpus
Habeas corpus
Habeas corpus
(/ˈheɪbiəs ˈkɔːpəs/; Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
meaning literally "that you have the body")[1] is a recourse in law through which a person can report an unlawful detention or imprisonment to a court and request that the court order the custodian of the person, usually a prison official, to bring the prisoner to court, to determine whether the detention is lawful.[2] The writ of habeas corpus is known as "the great and efficacious writ in all manner of illegal confinement",[Note 1] being a remedy available to the meanest against the mightiest. It is a summons with the force of a court order; it is addressed to the custodian (a prison official, for example) and demands that a prisoner be taken before the court, and that the custodian present proof of authority, allowing the court to determine whether the custodian has lawful authority to detain the prisoner
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Third Geneva Convention
The Third Geneva Convention, relative to the treatment of prisoners of war, is one of the four treaties of the Geneva Conventions. The Geneva Convention relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War was first adopted in 1929, but significantly revised at the 1949 conference. It defines humanitarian protections for prisoners of war
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Middle Ages
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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Daniel Heller-Roazen
Daniel Heller-Roazen [1] teaches at Princeton University.[2] He is one of the translators into English of work by Giorgio Agamben. Books in English[edit](ed. and tr.) Potentialities: Collected Essays in Philosophy by Giorgio Agamben, 1999. Fortune's Faces: The Roman de la Rose and the Poetics of Contingency, 2003. Echolalias: On the Forgetting of Language, 2005. The Inner Touch: Archaeology of a Sensation, 2007
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