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Hollywood
Hollywood
Hollywood
(/ˈhɒliwʊd/ HOL-ee-wuud) is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles, California. This densely populated neighborhood is notable as the home of the U.S
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Stable
A stable is a building in which livestock, especially horses, are kept. It most commonly means a building that is divided into separate stalls for individual animals. There are many different types of stables in use today; the American-style barn, for instance, is a large barn with a door at each end and individual stalls inside or free-standing stables with top and bottom-opening doors. The term "stable" is also used to describe a group of animals kept by one owner, regardless of housing or location. The exterior design of a stable can vary widely, based on climate, building materials, historical period and cultural styles of architecture. A wide range of building materials can be used, including masonry (bricks or stone), wood and steel
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Cinema In The United States
Cinema
Cinema
may refer to:Contents1 Movie 2 Music2.1 Bands 2.2 Albums 2.3 Songs3 Other 4 See alsoMovie[edit]Cinematography, the science or art of motion-picture photography Film
Film
or movie, a series of still images that create the illusion of a moving image
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Tram
A tram (also tramcar; and in North America streetcar, trolley or trolley car) is a rail vehicle which runs on tracks along public urban streets, and also sometimes on a segregated right of way.[1][2] The lines or networks operated by tramcars are called tramways. Tramways powered by electricity, the most common type, were once called electric street railways (mainly in the United States) due to their being widely used in urban areas before the universal adoption of electrification. In the United States, the term tram has sometimes been used for rubber-tyred trackless trains, which are not related to the other vehicles covered in this article. Tram
Tram
vehicles are usually lighter and shorter than conventional trains and rapid transit trains. Today, most trams use electrical power, usually fed by an overhead pantograph; in some cases by a sliding shoe on a third rail, trolley pole or bow collector
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Citrus
Important species: Citrus
Citrus
maxima – Pomelo Citrus medica
Citrus medica
– Citron Citrus micrantha – a papeda
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Vineyard
A vineyard /ˈvɪnjərd/ is a plantation of grape-bearing vines, grown mainly for winemaking, but also raisins, table grapes and non-alcoholic grape juice. The science, practice and study of vineyard production is known as viticulture. A vineyard is often characterised by its terroir, a French term loosely translating as "a sense of place" that refers to the specific geographical and geological characteristics of grapevine plantations, which may be imparted in the wine.Contents1 History 2 Modern practices 3 Current trends 4 Terroir 5 Vignette 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit]Satyrs in vineyard. Attic red-figure volute-krater, ca
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Opuntia
Many, see text.SynonymsAirampoa Frič Cactodendron Bigelow (nom. inval.) Cactus
Cactus
Lem. Chaffeyopuntia Frič & Schelle Clavarioidia Kreuz. (nom. inval.) Ficindica St.-Lag. Nopalea Salm-Dyck Parviopuntia Soulaire & Marn.-Lap. (nom. inval.) Phyllarthus Neck. ex M.Gómez (nom. inval.) Pseudotephrocactus Frič Salmiopuntia Frič (nom. inval.) Subulatopuntia Frič & Schelle Tunas Lunell Weberiopuntia Fričand see text Opuntia
Opuntia
is a genus in the cactus family, Cactaceae. The most common culinary species is the Indian fig opuntia (O. ficus-indica). Most culinary uses of the term "prickly pear" refer to this species
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Nopal
Nopal
Nopal
(from the Nahuatl
Nahuatl
word nohpalli [noʔˈpalːi] for the pads of the plant) is a common name in Mexican Spanish
Mexican Spanish
for Opuntia
Opuntia
cacti (commonly referred to in English as prickly pear), as well as for its pads. There are approximately one hundred and fourteen known species endemic to Mexico,[1] where the plant is a common ingredient in numerous Mexican cuisine
Mexican cuisine
dishes. The nopal pads can be eaten raw or cooked, used in marmalades, soups stews and salads, as well as being used for traditional medicine or as fodder for animals. Farmed nopales are most often of the species Opuntia
Opuntia
ficus-indica or Opuntia
Opuntia
joconostle although the pads of almost all Opuntia
Opuntia
species are edible
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Adobe
Adobe
Adobe
(US: /əˈdoʊbi/ ( listen), UK: /əˈdoʊb/;[1] Spanish: [aˈðoβe]) is a building material made from earth and other organic materials. Adobe
Adobe
means mudbrick in Spanish, but in some English-speaking regions of Spanish heritage, the term is used to refer to any kind of earth construction. Most adobe buildings are similar in appearance to cob and rammed earth buildings
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Municipality
A municipality is usually a single urban or administrative division having corporate status and powers of self-government or jurisdiction as granted by national and state laws to which it is subordinate
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Merger (politics)
A merger, consolidation or amalgamation, in a political or administrative sense, is the combination of two or more political or administrative entities, such as municipalities (in other words cities, towns, etc.), counties, districts, etc., into a single entity. This term is used when the process occurs within a sovereign entity. Unbalanced growth or outward expansion of one neighbor may necessitate an administrative decision to merge (see urban sprawl). In some cases, common perception of continuity may be a factor in prompting such a process (see conurbation)
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U.S. State
A state is a constituent political entity of the United States. There are currently 50 states, which are bound together in a union with each other. Each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the United States federal government. Due to the shared sovereignty between each state and the federal government, Americans
Americans
are citizens of both the federal republic and of the state in which they reside.[3] State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons covered by certain types of court orders (e.g., paroled convicts and children of divorced spouses who are sharing custody)
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North American Numbering Plan
The North American Numbering Plan
North American Numbering Plan
(NANP) is a telephone numbering plan that encompasses 25 distinct regions in twenty countries primarily in North America, including the Caribbean
Caribbean
and the U.S. territories. Not all North American countries participate in the NANP. The NANP was originally devised in the 1940s by AT&T for the Bell System and independent telephone operators in North America, to unify the diverse local numbering plans that had been established in the preceding decades. AT&T continued to administer the numbering plan until the breakup of the Bell System
Bell System
when administration was delegated to the North American Numbering Plan
North American Numbering Plan
Administration (NANPA), a service that has been procured from the private sector by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the United States
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Roadhouse (facility)
A roadhouse (US) or stopping house (Canada) is a commercial establishment typically built on or near a major road or highway that services passing travellers. The word's meaning varies slightly by country. The historical equivalent was often known as a coaching inn, providing food, drink, and rest to people and horses.Contents1 North America 2 Australia 3 Britain 4 Spain 5 In popular culture 6 See also 7 ReferencesNorth America[edit]Roadhouses along a trail to Klondike, Yukon, 1898The "roadhouse" or "road house" acts as a restaurant, serving meals, especially in the evenings. It has a bar serving beer or hard liquor and features music, dancing, and sometimes gambling. Most roadhouses are located along highways or roads in rural areas or on the outskirts of towns
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List Of Sovereign States
This list of sovereign states provides an overview of sovereign states around the world, with information on their status and recognition of their sovereignty. Membership within the United Nations
United Nations
system divides the 206 listed states into three categories: 193 member states,[1] 2 observer states, and 11 other states. The sovereignty dispute column indicates states whose sovereignty is undisputed (191 states) and states whose sovereignty is disputed (15 states, out of which there are 5 member states, 1 observer state and 9 other states). Compiling a list such as this can be a difficult and controversial process, as there is no definition that is binding on all the members of the community of nations concerning the criteria for statehood. For more information on the criteria used to determine the contents of this list, please see the criteria for inclusion section below
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Metonymy
Metonymy (UK: /mɛˈtɒnɪmi/, US: /mɪ-/)[1] is a figure of speech in which a thing or concept is referred to by the name of something closely associated with that thing or concept.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Introduction 3 Meaning relationships3.1 Metaphor
Metaphor
and metonymy 3.2 Examples3.2.1 Places and institutions4 Rhetoric
Rhetoric
in ancient history 5 Jakobson, structuralism, and realism 6 See also 7 References7.1 Notes 7.2 Bibliography8 Further readingEtymology[edit] The words metonymy and metonym come from the Greek μετωνυμία, metōnymía, "a change of name", from μετά, metá, "after, beyond", and -ωνυμία, -ōnymía, a suffix that names figures of speech, from ὄνυμα, ónyma or ὄνομα, ónoma, "name".[3] Introduction[edit] Metonymy and related figures of speech are common in everyday speech and writing
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