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Holding Company
A holding company is a company that owns other companies' outstanding stock. A holding company usually does not produce goods or services itself; rather, its purpose is to own shares of other companies to form a corporate group. Holding companies allow the reduction of risk for the owners and can allow the ownership and control of a number of different companies. In the United States, 80% of stock, in voting and value, must be owned before tax consolidation benefits such as tax-free dividends can be claimed.[1] That is, if Company A owns 80% or more of the stock of Company B, Company A will not pay taxes on dividends paid by Company B to its stockholders, as the payment of dividends from B to A is essentially transferring cash from one company to the other
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Big Brother And The Holding Company
Big Brother and the Holding Company
Big Brother and the Holding Company
is an American rock band that formed in San Francisco
San Francisco
in 1965 as part of the same psychedelic music scene that produced the Grateful Dead, Quicksilver Messenger Service, and Jefferson Airplane. They are best known as the band that featured Janis Joplin
Janis Joplin
as their lead singer. Their 1968 album Cheap Thrills is considered one of the masterpieces of the psychedelic sound of San Francisco; it reached number one on the Billboard charts, and was ranked number 338 in Rolling Stone's the 500 greatest albums of all time
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Stock
The stock (also capital stock) of a corporation is constituted of the equity stock of its owners. A single share of the stock represents fractional ownership of the corporation in proportion to the total number of shares. In liquidation, the stock represents the residual assets of the company that would be due to stockholders after discharge of all senior claims such as secured and unsecured debt. Stockholders' equity cannot be withdrawn from the company in a way that is intended to be detrimental to the company's creditors.[1]Contents1 Shares 2 Types2.1 Rule 144 stock3 Stock
Stock
derivatives 4 History 5 Shareholder 6 Application6.1 Shareholder rights 6.2 Means of financing7 Trading7.1 Buying 7.2 Selling 7.3 Stock
Stock
price fluctuations 7.4 Share price determination 7.5 Arbitrage trading8 See also 9 References 10 External linksShares[edit] The shares together form stock
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WNNX (FM)
WNNX (100.5 FM, "Rock 100.5") is an Atlanta radio station airing a Mainstream Rock format. It is owned and operated by Cumulus Media
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Susquehanna Radio
The Susquehanna Radio Corporation was a media corporation which operated from 1941 to 2006 that was headquartered in York, Pennsylvania. The company was a unit of Susquehanna Pfaltzgraff, a conglomerate more widely known for the Pfaltzgraff kitchenware line than its broadcasting pursuits. Some of the early Susquehanna radio properties included top 40 music stations WSBA (910 AM) in York, WARM (590 AM) in Scranton, Pennsylvania, WICE (1290 AM, now WRPA) in Providence, Rhode Island, and WHLO (640 AM) in Akron, Ohio. WQBA (1140 AM), a Spanish-language station in Miami, Florida, was also part of the group
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Cumulus Media
Cumulus Media, Inc. is an American broadcasting company and is the third largest owner and operator of AM and FM radio stations in the United States
United States
behind Entercom
Entercom
and iHeartMedia, Inc. Cumulus lists ownership of 446 stations in 90 markets, as of July 1, 2017.[3] It also owns Westwood One. Its headquarters are located in Atlanta, Georgia
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Maximum
In mathematical analysis, the maxima and minima (the respective plurals of maximum and minimum) of a function, known collectively as extrema (the plural of extremum), are the largest and smallest value of the function, either within a given range (the local or relative extrema) or on the entire domain of a function (the global or absolute extrema).[1][2][3] Pierre de Fermat
Pierre de Fermat
was one of the first mathematicians to propose a general technique, adequality, for finding the maxima and minima of functions. As defined in set theory, the maximum and minimum of a set are the greatest and least elements in the set, respectively
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Local Marketing Agreement
In U.S. and Canadian broadcasting, a local marketing agreement (or local management agreement, abbreviated as an LMA) is a contract in which one company agrees to operate a radio or television station owned by another party. In essence, it is a sort of lease or time-buy. Under Federal Communications Commission
Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) regulations, a local marketing agreement must give the company operating the station (the "senior" partner) under the agreement control over the entire facilities of the station, including the finances, personnel and programming of the station. Its original licensee (the "junior" partner) still remains legally responsible for the station and its operations, such as compliance with relevant regulations regarding content. Occasionally, a "local marketing agreement" may refer to the sharing or contracting of only certain functions, in particular advertising sales
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Internal Revenue Code
The Internal Revenue Code
Internal Revenue Code
(IRC), formally the Internal Revenue Code
Internal Revenue Code
of 1986, is the domestic portion of federal statutory tax law in the United States, published in various volumes of the United States Statutes at Large, and separately as Title 26 of the United States Code (USC).[1] It is organized topically, into subtitles and sections, covering income tax (see Income tax
Income tax
in the United States), payroll taxes, estate taxes, gift taxes, and excise taxes; as well as procedure and administration
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Board Of Directors
A board of directors is a recognized group of people who jointly oversee the activities of an organization, which can be either a for-profit business, nonprofit organization, or a government agency. Such a board's powers, duties, and responsibilities are determined by government regulations (including the jurisdiction's corporations law) and the organization's own constitution and bylaws. These authorities may specify the number of members of the board, how they are to be chosen, and how often they are to meet. In an organization with voting members, the board is accountable to, and might be subordinate to, the organization's full membership, which usually vote for the members of the board. In a stock corporation, non-executive directors are voted for by the shareholders and the board is the highest authority in the management of the corporation. The board of directors appoints the chief executive officer of the corporation and sets out the overall strategic direction
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Media Market
A media market, broadcast market, media region, designated market area (DMA), television market area, or simply market is a region where the population can receive the same (or similar) television and radio station offerings, and may also include other types of media including newspapers and Internet
Internet
content. They can coincide or overlap with one or more metropolitan areas, though rural regions with few significant population centers can also be designated as markets. Conversely, very large metropolitan areas can sometimes be subdivided into multiple segments. Market regions may overlap, meaning that people residing on the edge of one media market may be able to receive content from other nearby markets. They are widely used in audience measurements, which are compiled in the United States
United States
by Nielsen Media Research
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List Of Holding Companies
Under the United States Bank Holding Company Act, financial and bank holding companies are regulated by the US Federal Reserve.[1] Companies whose elections to be treated as financial holding companies are effective include:Contents1 0 - 9 2 A 3 B 4 C 5 D 6 E 7 F 8 G 9 H 10 I 11 J 12 K 13 L 14 M 15 N 16 O 17 P 18 R 19 S 20 U 21 W 22 Z 23 References0 - 9[edit]1ST UNITED BANCORP, INC., Boca Raton, FloridaA[edit]Ally Financial, Detroit, Michigan Alerus Financial, Grand Forks, North Dakota American Express, New York, New York Apple Bank for Savings, New York, New York Australia and New Zealand Banking Group, Melbourne, AustraliaB[edit]BancFirst Corporation, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Banco Bradesco, S.A., Osasco, Brazil Banco do Brasil, Brasilia, Brazil BancorpSouth, Inc, Tupelo, Mississippi Bank Hapoalim B.M., Tel Aviv, Israel Bank of America Corporation, Charlotte, North Carolina Bank of Montreal, Montreal, Canada The Bank of New York
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Patent Holding Company
A patent holding company (PHC) exists to hold patents on behalf of one or more other companies but does not necessarily manufacture products or supply services based upon the patents held. Patent holding companies may exist for tax reasons.[1] Patent holding companies may also operate patent pools in order to provide a single source for licensing a patented technology.[2] However, patent holding companies that aggressively seek to enforce patent rights through litigation or threats of litigation are referred to as patent assertion entities (PAEs) or, more pejoratively, patent trolls.[3][4] Patent trolling[edit] Main article: Patent troll On June 4, 2013, the National Economic Council and Council of Economic Advisers released a report entitled Patent Assertion and U.S. Innovation that found significant harm to the economy from patent assertion entities and made recommendations to address them.[5] U.S. President Barack Obama also addressed the issue, criticizing companies that did not pr
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National Museum Of American History
The National Museum
Museum
of American History: Kenneth E. Behring Center collects, preserves, and displays the heritage of the United States
United States
in the areas of social, political, cultural, scientific, and military history. Among the items on display is the original Star-Spangled Banner
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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