HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

History Of Mechanics
Mechanics
Mechanics
(Greek μηχανική) is that area of science which is concerned with the behaviour of physical bodies when subjected to forces or displacements, and the subsequent effects of the bodies on their environment. The scientific discipline has its origins in Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
with the writings of Aristotle
Aristotle
and Archimedes[1][2][3] (see History of classical mechanics
History of classical mechanics
and Timeline of classical mechanics). During the early modern period, scientists such as Galileo, Kepler, and Newton, laid the foundation for what is now known as classical mechanics. It is a branch of classical physics that deals with particles that are either at rest or are moving with velocities significantly less than the speed of light
[...More...]

"History Of Mechanics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Mechanic (other)
Mechanic, mechanical, mechanician, or mechanics may refer to:Contents1 Professions 2 People 3 Art, entertainment, and media 4 Science and technology 5 See alsoProfessions[edit]Mechanic, a person who uses tools to fix and maintain machineryAircraft Maintenance Technician, or aircraft mechanic, a person who repairs aircraft Auto mechanic, a person who repairs automobilesCard mechanic, a card cheat who specializes in sleight-of-hand manipulation of cards MechanicianPeople[edit] Mechanic
Mechanic

[...More...]

"Mechanic (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Power (physics)
In physics, power is the rate of doing work, the amount of energy transferred per unit time. Having no direction, it is a scalar quantity. In the International System of Units, the unit of power is the joule per second (J/s), known as the watt in honour of James Watt, the eighteenth-century developer of the steam engine condenser. Another common and traditional measure is horsepower (comparing to the power of a horse). Being the rate of work, the equation for power can be written: power = work time displaystyle text power = frac text work text time The integral of power over time defines the work performed. Because this integral depends on the trajectory of the point of application of the force and torque, this calculation of work is said to be path dependent. As a physical concept, power requires both a change in the physical universe and a specified time in which the change occurs
[...More...]

"Power (physics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Couple (mechanics)
In mechanics, a couple is a system of forces with a resultant (a.k.a. net or sum) moment but no resultant force.[1] A better term is force couple or pure moment. Its effect is to create rotation without translation, or more generally without any acceleration of the centre of mass. In rigid body mechanics, force couples are free vectors, meaning their effects on a body are independent of the point of application. The resultant moment of a couple is called a torque. This is not to be confused with the term torque as it is used in physics, where it is merely a synonym of moment.[2] Instead, torque is a special case of moment
[...More...]

"Couple (mechanics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

D'Alembert's Principle
D'Alembert's principle, also known as the Lagrange–d'Alembert principle, is a statement of the fundamental classical laws of motion. It is named after its discoverer, the French physicist and mathematician Jean le Rond d'Alembert. It is the dynamic analogue to the principle of virtual work for applied forces in a static system and in fact is more general than Hamilton's principle, avoiding restriction to holonomic systems.[1] A holonomic constraint depends only on the coordinates and time. It does not depend on the velocities
[...More...]

"D'Alembert's Principle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Energy
In physics, energy is the quantitative property that must be transferred to an object in order to perform work on, or to heat, the object.[note 1] Energy
Energy
is a conserved quantity; the law of conservation of energy states that energy can be converted in form, but not created or destroyed. The SI unit of energy is the joule, which is the energy transferred to an object by the work of moving it a distance of 1 metre against a force of 1 newton. Common forms of energy include the kinetic energy of a moving object, the potential energy stored by an object's position in a force field (gravitational, electric or magnetic), the elastic energy stored by stretching solid objects, the chemical energy released when a fuel burns, the radiant energy carried by light, and the thermal energy due to an object's temperature. Mass
Mass
and energy are closely related
[...More...]

"Energy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Potential Energy
U = m · g · h (gravitational) U = ½ · k · x2 U = ½ · C · V2 (electric) U = -m · B (magnetic)Part of a series of articles aboutClassical mechanics F → = m a → displaystyle vec F =m vec a Second law of motionHistory TimelineBranchesApplied Celestial Continuum Dynamics Kinematics Kinetics Statics StatisticalFundamentalsAcceleration Angular momentum Couple D'Alembert's principle Energykinetic potentialForce Frame of reference Inertial frame of reference Impulse Inertia / Moment of inertia MassMechanical power Mechanical workMoment Momentum Space Speed Time Torque Velocity Virtual workFormulationsNewton's laws of motionAnalytical mechanicsLagrangian mechanics Hamiltonian mechanics Routhian mechanics Hamilton–Jacobi equation Appell's equation of m
[...More...]

"Potential Energy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Frame Of Reference
In physics, a frame of reference (or reference frame) consists of an abstract coordinate system and the set of physical reference points that uniquely fix (locate and orient) the coordinate system and standardize measurements. In n dimensions, n+1 reference points are sufficient to fully define a reference frame. Using rectangular (Cartesian) coordinates, a reference frame may be defined with a reference point at the origin and a reference point at one unit distance along each of the n coordinate axes. In Einsteinian relativity, reference frames are used to specify the relationship between a moving observer and the phenomenon or phenomena under observation. In this context, the phrase often becomes "observational frame of reference" (or "observational reference frame"), which implies that the observer is at rest in the frame, although not necessarily located at its origin
[...More...]

"Frame Of Reference" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Inertial Frame Of Reference
An inertial frame of reference, in classical physics, is a frame of reference in which bodies, whose net force acting upon them is zero, are not accelerated; that is they are at rest or they move at a constant velocity in a straight line.[1] In analytical terms, it is a frame of reference that describes time and space homogeneously, isotropically, and in a time-independent manner.[2] Conceptually, in classical physics and special relativity, the physics of a system in an inertial frame have no causes external to the system.[3] An inertial frame of reference may also be called an inertial reference frame, inertial frame, Galilean reference frame, or inertial space.[citation needed] All inertial frames are in a state of constant, rectilinear motion with respect to one another; an accelerometer moving with any of them would detect zero acceleration
[...More...]

"Inertial Frame Of Reference" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Impulse (physics)
In classical mechanics, impulse (symbolized by J or Imp[1]) is the integral of a force, F, over the time interval, t, for which it acts. Since force is a vector quantity, impulse is also a vector in the same direction. Impulse applied to an object produces an equivalent vector change in its linear momentum, also in the same direction.[2] The SI unit of impulse is the newton second (N⋅s), and the dimensionally equivalent unit of momentum is the kilogram meter per second (kg⋅m/s). The corresponding English engineering units are the pound-second (lbf⋅s) and the slug-foot per second (slug⋅ft/s). A resultant force causes acceleration and a change in the velocity of the body for as long as it acts. A resultant force applied over a longer time therefore produces a bigger change in linear momentum than the same force applied briefly: the change in momentum is equal to the product of the average force and duration
[...More...]

"Impulse (physics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Inertia
Inertia
Inertia
is the resistance of any physical object to any change in its state of motion. This includes changes to the object's speed, direction, or state of rest. Inertia
Inertia
is also defined as the tendency of objects to keep moving in a straight line at a constant velocity. The principle of inertia is one of the fundamental principles in classical physics that are still used to describe the motion of objects and how they are affected by the applied forces on them. Inertia
Inertia
comes from the Latin word, iners, meaning idle, sluggish. Inertia
Inertia
is one of the primary manifestations of mass, which is a quantitative property of physical systems
[...More...]

"Inertia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Moment Of Inertia
The moment of inertia, otherwise known as the angular mass or rotational inertia, of a rigid body is a tensor that determines the torque needed for a desired angular acceleration about a rotational axis. It depends on the body's mass distribution and the axis chosen, with larger moments requiring more torque to change the body's rotation. It is an extensive (additive) property: For a point mass the moment of inertia is just the mass times the square of perpendicular distance to the rotation axis. The moment of inertia of a rigid composite system is the sum of the moments of inertia of its component subsystems (all taken about the same axis)
[...More...]

"Moment Of Inertia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mass
Mass
Mass
is both a property of a physical body and a measure of its resistance to acceleration (a change in its state of motion) when a net force is applied.[1] It also determines the strength of its mutual gravitational attraction to other bodies. The basic SI unit
SI unit
of mass is the kilogram (kg). In physics, mass is not the same as weight, even though mass is often determined by measuring the object's weight using a spring scale, rather than balance scale comparing it directly with known masses. An object on the Moon
Moon
would weigh less than it does on Earth
Earth
because of the lower gravity, but it would still have the same mass. This is because weight is a force, while mass is the property that (along with gravity) determines the strength of this force. In Newtonian physics, mass can be generalized as the amount of matter in an object
[...More...]

"Mass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Work (physics)
W = F ⋅ s W = τ θPart of a series of articles aboutClassical mechanics F → = m a → displaystyle vec F =m vec a Second
Second
law of motionHistory TimelineBranchesApplied Celestial Continuum Dynamics Kinematics Kinetics Statics StatisticalFundamentalsAcceleration Angular momentum Couple D'Alembert's principle Energykinetic potentialForce Frame of reference Inertial frame of reference Impulse Inertia / Moment of inertia MassMechanical power M
[...More...]

"Work (physics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Acceleration
In physics, acceleration is the rate of change of velocity of an object with respect to time. An object's acceleration is the net result of any and all forces acting on the object, as described by Newton's Second
Second
Law.[1] The SI unit
SI unit
for acceleration is metre per second squared (m s−2). Accelerations are vector quantities (they have magnitude and direction) and add according to the parallelogram law.[2][3] As a vector, the calculated net force is equal to the product of the object's mass (a scalar quantity) and its acceleration. For example, when a car starts from a standstill (zero relative velocity) and travels in a straight line at increasing speeds, it is accelerating in the direction of travel. If the car turns, an acceleration occurs toward the new direction
[...More...]

"Acceleration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Moment (physics)
In physics, a moment is an expression involving the product of a distance and a physical quantity, and in this way it accounts for how the physical quantity is located or arranged. Moments are usually defined with respect to a fixed reference point; they deal with physical quantities as measured at some distance from that reference point. For example, the moment of force acting on an object, often called torque, is the product of the force and the distance from a reference point. In principle, any physical quantity can be multiplied by distance to produce a moment; commonly used quantities include forces, masses, and electric charge distributions.Contents1 History 2 Elaboration2.1 Examples3 Multipole moments 4 Applications of multipole moments 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The concept of moment in physics is derived from the mathematical concept of moments.[1] [clarification needed]
[...More...]

"Moment (physics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.