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Historic Monuments Of Ancient Kyoto
The UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities) encompasses 17 locations in Japan
Japan
within the city of Kyoto
Kyoto
and its immediate vicinity. The locations are in three cities: Kyoto
Kyoto
and Uji in Kyoto
Kyoto
Prefecture; and Ōtsu in Shiga Prefecture; Uji and Ōtsu border Kyoto
Kyoto
to the south and north, respectively. Of the monuments, 13 are Buddhist temples, three are Shinto
Shinto
shrines, and one is a castle. The properties include 38 buildings designated by the Japanese government as National Treasures, 160 properties designated as Important Cultural Properties, eight gardens designated as Special
Special
Places of Scenic Beauty, and four designated as Places of Scenic Beauty
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World Heritage Site
A World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
is a landmark or area which is selected by the United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as having cultural, historical, scientific or other form of significance, and is legally protected by international treaties. The sites are judged important to the collective interests of humanity. To be selected, a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
must be an already classified landmark, unique in some respect as a geographically and historically identifiable place having special cultural or physical significance (such as an ancient ruin or historical structure, building, city, complex, desert, forest, island, lake, monument, mountain, or wilderness area)
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Oda Nobunaga
Oda Nobunaga
Oda Nobunaga
(織田 信長,  Oda Nobunaga (help·info), June 23, 1534 – June 21, 1582) was a powerful daimyō (feudal lord) of Japan
Japan
in the late 16th century who attempted to unify Japan during the late Sengoku period. Nobunaga is regarded as one of three unifiers of Japan
Japan
along with his retainers Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
and Tokugawa Ieyasu. During his later life, Nobunaga was widely known for most brutal suppression of determined opponents, eliminating those who by principle refused to cooperate or yield to his demands. His reign was noted for innovative military tactics, fostering free trade, and encouraging the start of the Momoyama historical art period
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Shingon
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa BuddhismShambhala BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuitBuddhahood BodhisattvaKalachakraPracticesGeneration stage Completion stagePhowaTantric techniques: Fourfold division:KriyayogaCharyayogaYogatantraAnuttarayogatantraTwofold division:Inner TantrasOuter TantrasThought forms and visualisation:MandalaMantraMudraThangkaYantraYoga:Deity yogaDream yogaDeath yogaNgöndro Guru
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Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto
Higashiyama (東山区, Higashiyama-ku, meaning "east mountain") is one of the eleven wards in the city of Kyoto, in Kyoto
Kyoto
Prefecture, Japan.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Sights 5 Education 6 External linksHistory[edit] It was created in 1929 when it was split off from Shimogyō-ku. During the years 1931 to 1976 it also covered the area of present-day Yamashina-ku, which was an independent town until its merger into the city in 1931. The name literally means "Eastern Mountain District". Due to the restrictions against urban development, the population inside the ward is continually decreasing. Higashiyama-ku has the lowest population of all the wards in Kyoto, and a disproportionate number of elderly people. Geography[edit] Interposed between the Kamo River
Kamo River
and the Higashiyama mountain range, Higashiyama-ku is roughly bounded by the Sanjō street in the north, and the Jūjō street in the south
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National Treasure (Japan)
A National Treasure (国宝: kokuhō) is the most precious of Japan's Tangible Cultural Properties, as determined and designated by the Agency for Cultural Affairs
Agency for Cultural Affairs
(a subsidiary of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology). A Tangible Cultural Property is considered to be of historic or artistic value, classified either as "buildings and structures" or as "fine arts and crafts." Each National Treasure must show outstanding workmanship, a high value for world cultural history, or exceptional value for scholarship. Approximately 20% of the National Treasures are structures such as castles, Buddhist temples, Shinto
Shinto
shrines, or residences. The other 80% are paintings; scrolls; sutras; works of calligraphy; sculptures of wood, bronze, lacquer or stone; crafts such as pottery and lacquerware carvings; metalworks; swords and textiles; and archaeological and historical artifacts
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Cultural Property (Japan)
A Cultural Property (文化財, bunkazai) is administered by the Japanese government's Agency for Cultural Affairs, and includes tangible properties (structures and works of art or craft); intangible properties (performing arts and craft techniques); folk properties both tangible and intangible; monuments historic, scenic and natural; cultural landscapes; and groups of traditional buildings. Buried properties and conservation techniques are also protected.[1] Together these cultural properties are to be preserved and utilized as the heritage of the Japanese people.[2][note 1] To protect Japan's cultural heritage, the Law for the Protection of Cultural Properties contains a "designation system" (指定制度) under which selected important items are designated as Cultural Properties,[note 2] which imposes restrictions on the alteration, repair, and export of such designated objects
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Tendai
Tendai
Tendai
(天台宗, Tendai-shū) is a Japanese school of Mahayana Buddhism, a descendant of the Chinese Tiantai
Tiantai
or Lotus Sutra
Lotus Sutra
school. David W. Chappell frames the relevance of Tendai
Tendai
for a universal Buddhism:[1]Although Tendai
Tendai
(Chin., T'ien-t'ai) has the reputation of being a major denomination in Japanese history, and the most comprehensive and diversified school of Chinese Buddhism, it is almost unknown in the West
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Saicho
Saichō
Saichō
(最澄, September 15, 767 – June 26, 822) was a Japanese Buddhist monk credited with founding the Tendai
Tendai
school of Buddhism based on the Chinese Tiantai
Tiantai
school he was exposed to during his trip to Tang China
China
beginning in 804. He founded the temple and headquarters of Tendai
Tendai
at Enryaku-ji
Enryaku-ji
on Mount Hiei
Mount Hiei
near Kyoto. He is also said to have been the first to bring tea to Japan
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Mahayana Buddhism
Mahāyāna (/ˌmɑːhəˈjɑːnə/; Sanskrit
Sanskrit
for "great vehicle") is one of two (or three, under some classifications) main existing branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
and a term for classification of Buddhist philosophies and practice
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Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
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Kita-ku, Kyoto
Kita (北区, Kita-ku) is one of the eleven wards in the city of Kyoto, in Kyoto
Kyoto
Prefecture, Japan. Its name means "North Ward." As of 2016, the ward has an estimated population of 119,074 people.[1]Contents1 Demographics 2 Education2.1 Universities 2.2 Primary and secondary schools3 Culture 4 Temples and Landmarks 5 References 6 External linksDemographics[edit]Historical populationYear Pop. ±%1960 123,230 —    1970 135,681 +10.1%1980 136,181 +0.4%1990 127,348 −6.5%2000 126,125 −1.0%2010 122,037 −3.2%2015 119,474 −2.1%Source: [1]Education[edit] Universities[edit]Bukkyo University Kyoto
Kyoto
Sangyo University Ritsumeikan University, Kinugasa Campus Otani UniversityPrimary and secondary schools[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (October 2015)The community previously had a North Korean school, Kyoto
Kyoto
Korean No
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Fushimi-ku, Kyoto
Fushimi (伏見区, Fushimi-ku) is one of the eleven wards in the city of Kyoto, in Kyoto
Kyoto
Prefecture, Japan. Famous places in Fushimi include the Fushimi Inari
Fushimi Inari
Shrine, with thousands of torii lining the paths up and down a mountain; Fushimi Castle, originally built by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, with its rebuilt towers and gold-lined tea-room; and the Teradaya, an inn at which Sakamoto Ryōma
Sakamoto Ryōma
was attacked and injured about a year before his assassination. Also of note is the Gokōgu shrine, which houses a stone used in the construction of Fushimi Castle
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Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
(豊臣 秀吉, March 17, 1537 – September 18, 1598) was a preeminent daimyō, warrior, general, samurai, and politician of the Sengoku period[1] who is regarded as Japan's second "great unifier".[2] He succeeded his former liege lord, Oda Nobunaga, and brought an end to the Warring Lords period. The period of his rule is often called the Momoyama period, named after Hideyoshi's castle. After his death, his young son Hideyori was displaced by Tokugawa Ieyasu. Hideyoshi is noted for a number of cultural legacies, including the restriction that only members of the samurai class could bear arms. He financed the construction, restoration and rebuilding of many temples standing today in Kyoto. Outside of Japan, he is best known for ordering the Japanese invasions of Korea (1592–98)
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Ukyō-ku, Kyoto
Ukyō-ku (右京区) is one of the eleven wards in the city of Kyoto, in Kyoto
Kyoto
Prefecture, Japan.Contents1 History 2 Sights 3 Economy 4 Education4.1 Senior High Schools 4.2 Universities 4.3 Others5 Sights of Ukyo-ku 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The meaning of ukyō (右京) is "on the Emperor's right." When residing in the Kyoto Imperial Palace
Kyoto Imperial Palace
the emperor would sit facing south,[1] thus the western direction would be to his right. Similarly, there is a ward to the east called Sakyō-ku (左京区), meaning "the ward on the Emperor's left." In old times, ukyō was referring to the western part of the capital
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Emperor Kōkō
Emperor Kōkō
Emperor Kōkō
(光孝天皇, Kōkō-tennō, 830 – August 26, 887) was the 58th emperor of Japan,[1] according to the traditional order of succession.[2] Kōkō reigned from 884 to 887.[3]Contents1 Traditional narrative 2 Events of Kōkō's life2.1 Kugyō3 Eras of Kōkō's reign 4 Consorts and children 5 Poetry 6 Ancestry 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksTraditional narrative[edit] Before his ascension to the Chrysanthemum
Chrysanthemum
Throne, his personal name (imina)[4] was Tokiyatsu (時康親王)[5] or Komatsu-tei.[6] He would later be identified sometimes as "the Emperor of Komatsu".[7] This resulted in the later Emperor Go-Komatsu
Emperor Go-Komatsu
adopting this name (go- meaning "later", so "Later Emperor Komatsu" or "Emperor Komatsu II"). Tokiyatsu Shinnō was the third son of Emperor Ninmyō
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