HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Hirohito
Hirohito
Hirohito
(裕仁; April 29, 1901 – January 7, 1989) was the 124th Emperor of Japan
Emperor of Japan
according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from December 25, 1926, until his death. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Akihito. In Japan, he is now referred to primarily by his posthumous name, Emperor Shōwa. The word Shōwa is the name of the era that corresponded with the Emperor's reign, and was made the Emperor's own name upon his death
[...More...]

"Hirohito" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tokyo
Tokyo
Tokyo
(/ˈtoʊkioʊ/, Japanese: [toːkʲoː] ( listen)), officially Tokyo Metropolis,[6] is the capital city of Japan
Japan
and one of its 47 prefectures.[7] The Greater Tokyo Area
Greater Tokyo Area
is the most populous metropolitan area in the world.[8] It is the seat of the Emperor of Japan
Japan
and the Japanese government. Tokyo
Tokyo
is in the Kantō region
Kantō region
on the southeastern side of the main island Honshu
Honshu
and includes the Izu Islands and Ogasawara Islands.[9] Formerly known as Edo, it has been the de facto seat of government since 1603 when Shōgun
Shōgun
Tokugawa Ieyasu made the city his headquarters
[...More...]

"Tokyo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aoyama, Minato, Tokyo
Aoyama (青山, "Blue Mountain") is one of the wealthiest neighborhoods of Tokyo, located in the northwest portion of Minato Ward. The area is well known for its international fashion houses, cafes and restaurants. Kita-Aoyama (北青山) or "North Aoyama" refers to the area on the north side of Aoyama-dori (Aoyama Street) between the Akasaka Palace and Aoyama Gakuin University, while Minami-Aoyama (南青山) or "South Aoyama" refers to the area to the south of Aoyama-dori and extends to the northern edge of Roppongi, Azabu
Azabu
and Hiroo. During the Edo Period, Aoyama was home to various temples, shrines, and samurai residences. The name Aoyama derived from a samurai named Aoyama Tadanari who served the Tokugawa Shogunate and held his mansion in this area. Today, along with Shibuya and Harajuku, it is one of the most popular entertainment and shopping areas "Omotesando", for young people in Tokyo
[...More...]

"Aoyama, Minato, Tokyo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Tōgū Palace
The Tōgū Palace (東宮御所, Tōgū-gosho)[1] is located in the Akasaka Estate in Akasaka, Tokyo, and is the official residence of Crown Prince Naruhito, Crown Princess Masako and their daughter Princess Toshi. "Tōgū" literally means "East Palace", the traditional name for the residence of the Crown Prince in East Asia. Overview[edit] The site used to be the Ōmiya Palace (大宮御所, Ōmiya-gosho), the residence of Empress Teimei, the consort of Emperor Taishō. After her death at the palace in 1951, the site of the palace was converted to the Crown Prince's residence. Following tradition, the Crown Prince resided in the Akasaka Palace before moving to the more modern and smaller East Palace. Responsible for the upkeep and organisation of the palace is the Palace Chamberlain (東宮侍従, Tōgū-jijū)
[...More...]

"Tōgū Palace" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prime Minister Of Japan
The Prime Minister (内閣総理大臣, Naikaku-sōri-daijin, or 首相 Shushō) is the head of government of Japan. The Prime Minister is appointed by the Emperor of Japan
Emperor of Japan
after being designated by the National Diet
National Diet
and must enjoy the confidence of the House of Representatives to remain in office. He or she is the head of the Cabinet and appoints and dismisses the other Ministers of State
[...More...]

"Prime Minister Of Japan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kiyoura Keigo
The Japanese language
Japanese language
has many honorifics, referred to as keigo (敬語, literally "respectful language"), parts of speech that show respect. Their use is mandatory in many social situations. Honorifics in Japanese may be used to emphasize social distance or disparity in rank, or to emphasize social intimacy or similarity in rank. The system of honorifics in Japan is very extensive, including various levels of respectful, humble, and polite speech, and it closely resembles the honorific systems of the Korean language
Korean language
and, in some elements, Chinese
[...More...]

"Kiyoura Keigo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kōki Hirota
Kōki Hirota
Kōki Hirota
(廣田 弘毅, Hirota Kōki, 14 February 1878 – 23 December 1948) was a Japanese diplomat and politician who served as the 32nd Prime Minister of Japan
Prime Minister of Japan
from 9 March 1936 to 2 February 1937. Originally his name was Jōtarō (丈太郎). He was executed for war crimes committed during World War II in the Tokyo Trials.Contents1 Early life 2 Diplomatic career 3 Prime minister 4 Second diplomatic career 5 Final days 6 Honours 7 Notes 8 Sources 9 External linksEarly life[edit]Name plate of Suikyo Shrine written by Hirota at the age of 11Hirota was born in Kaji-machi dori (鍛冶町通り) in what is now part of Chūō-ku, Fukuoka
Chūō-ku, Fukuoka
city, Fukuoka Prefecture. His father was a stonemason whose family name was Tokubei (徳平), and who was adopted into the Hirota family
[...More...]

"Kōki Hirota" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hitoshi Ashida
Hitoshi Ashida
Hitoshi Ashida
(芦田 均, Ashida Hitoshi, 15 November 1887 – 20 June 1959) was a Japanese politician who served as the 34th Prime Minister of Japan
Japan
from 10 March to 15 October 1948. He was a prominent figure in the immediate postwar political landscape, but was forced to resign his leadership responsibilities after a corruption scandal (Shōwa Denkō Jiken) targeting two of his cabinet ministers.Contents1 Early political life 2 Prime Minister and later life 3 References 4 External linksEarly political life[edit] Ashida was born in Fukuchiyama, Kyoto, and studied French civil law at Tokyo
Tokyo
Imperial University. After graduation, he worked in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for twenty years. In 1932, Ashida ran his first successful campaign for a seat in the House of Representatives as a member of the Seiyūkai Party
[...More...]

"Hitoshi Ashida" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shigeru Yoshida
Shigeru Yoshida
Shigeru Yoshida
(吉田 茂, Yoshida Shigeru), KCVO (22 September 1878 – 20 October 1967) was a Japanese diplomat and politician who served as Prime Minister of Japan
Prime Minister of Japan
from 1946 to 1947 and from 1948 to 1954, becoming one of the longest serving PMs in Japanese history as the second-longest serving Prime Minister of Post-occupation Japan.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Diplomatic career 3 During World War II 4 Prime Ministership 5 Later years 6 Personal life 7 Honours 8 Selected works 9 Notes 10 References10.1 Further reading11 External linksEarly life and education[edit]Yoshida as a childYoshida was born in Yokosuka
Yokosuka
in 1878. His father, Takeuchi Tsuna, was an entrepreneur and political activist who would later serve in the first National Diet
National Diet
in 1890. Yoshida was the fifth of his fourteen children
[...More...]

"Shigeru Yoshida" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ichirō Hatoyama
Ichirō Hatoyama (鳩山 一郎, Hatoyama Ichirō, 1 January 1883 – 7 March 1959) was a Japanese politician and [1] 35th Prime Minister of Japan, serving terms from 10 December 1954 through 19 March 1955,[2] from then to 22 November 1955,[3] and from then through 23 December 1956.[4]Contents1 Personal life 2 Political career 3 Hatoyama family and freemasonry 4 Honours 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksPersonal life[edit] Ichirō Hatoyama was, as his name indicates, the first born boy. He was born into a wealthy cosmopolitan family in Tokyo
[...More...]

"Ichirō Hatoyama" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tanzan Ishibashi
Tanzan Ishibashi
Tanzan Ishibashi
(石橋 湛山, Ishibashi Tanzan, 25 September 1884 – 25 April 1973) was a Japanese journalist and politician. Being a member of Nichiren-shū, the name Tanzan is a religious name, as his profane name was Seizō (省三). He was the 55th Prime Minister of Japan
Japan
from 23 December 1956 to 25 February 1957. During the same time he was the 2nd president of the Liberal Democratic Party, the majority party in the Diet. From 1952 to 1968 he was also the president of Rissho University. Life[edit] He was born in Tokyo
Tokyo
and graduated from Waseda University. He worked as a journalist at the Mainichi Shimbun
Mainichi Shimbun
for a while. After he finished military service, he joined "Toyo Keizai Shimpo" (Eastern Economic Journal) and later he became its president in 1941
[...More...]

"Tanzan Ishibashi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hayato Ikeda
Hayato Ikeda
Hayato Ikeda
(池田勇人, Ikeda Hayato, 3 December 1899 – 13 August 1965) was a Japanese politician and 38th Prime Minister of Japan
Japan
from 19 July 1960 to 9 November 1964. He was the last Prime Minister born in the 19th century.Contents1 Early life 2 Political career2.1 Prime Minister 2.2 Retirement and death3 Honours 4 See also 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Ikeda was born in present-day Takehara, Hiroshima, on 3 December 1899.[1] He attended Kyoto Imperial University and joined the Ministry of Finance following graduation in 1925. While at the Ministry, he served as the head of the local tax offices in Hakodate
Hakodate
and Utsunomiya. During his time in the latter role, in 1929, he contracted pemphigus foliaceus and went on sick leave for two years, formally resigning in 1931 once his sick leave had run out. The condition was cured by 1934
[...More...]

"Hayato Ikeda" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eisaku Satō
Eisaku Satō
Eisaku Satō
(佐藤 榮作, Satō Eisaku, 27 March 1901 – 3 June 1975) was a Japanese politician and the 39th Prime Minister of Japan, elected on 9 November 1964, and re-elected on 17 February 1967, and 14 January 1970, serving until 7 July 1972. As such, he is the second longest serving PM in Japanese history and the first Prime Minister to have been born in the 20th century
[...More...]

"Eisaku Satō" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kakuei Tanaka
Kakuei Tanaka
Kakuei Tanaka
(田中 角栄 or 田中 角榮, Tanaka Kakuei, 4 May 1918 – 16 December 1993) was a Japanese politician who served in the House of Representatives from 26 April 1947 to 24 January 1990, and as the 40th Prime Minister of Japan
Prime Minister of Japan
from 7 July 1972 to 9 December 1974 (his two terms being divided by the 1972 general election). After a power struggle with Takeo Fukuda, he became the most influential member of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party from the mid-1960s until the mid-1980s. He was a central figure in several political scandals, culminating in the Lockheed bribery scandals
Lockheed bribery scandals
of 1976 which led to his arrest and trial; he was found guilty by two lower courts, but his case remained open before the Supreme Court through his death
[...More...]

"Kakuei Tanaka" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Takeo Fukuda
Takeo Fukuda
Takeo Fukuda
(福田 赳夫, Fukuda Takeo, 14 January 1905 – 5 July 1995) was a Japanese politician and the 42nd Prime Minister of Japan (67th administration) from 24 December 1976 to 7 December 1978.[1]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Death 5 Honours 6 ReferencesEarly life and education[edit] Fukuda was born in Gunma, capital of the Gunma
Gunma
Prefecture on 14 January 1905.[1] He hailed from a former Samurai family and his father was mayor of Gunma.[2] He held a law degree from University of Tokyo.[3] Career[edit] Before and during World War II, Fukuda served as a bureaucrat in the Finance Ministry and as Chief Cabinet Secretary. After the war, he became director of Japan's banking bureau from 1946 to 1947 and of budget bureau from 1947 to 1950.[2] In 1952, Fukuda was elected to the House of Representatives representing the third district of Gunma
[...More...]

"Takeo Fukuda" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Takeo Miki
Takeo Miki
Takeo Miki
(三木 武夫, Miki Takeo, 17 March 1907 – 14 November 1988) was a Japanese politician who served as the 41st Prime Minister of Japan
Japan
from 1974 until 1976.Contents1 Background summary 2 Miscellaneous2.1 Connection to Seattle 2.2 Slang Term3 Gallery 4 ReferencesBackground summary[edit]毎日グラフ, 毎日新聞社, 10 March 1952.Born in Awa, Tokushima, Miki graduated from Meiji University
Meiji University
in Tokyo. He attended the University of Southern California
University of Southern California
in Los Angeles, and was awarded an honorary doctorate in law from the institution in 1966.[1] Miki was elected to the Diet in 1937 and remained there until his death in 1988, during which he was elected a representative for 19 times over 51 years
[...More...]

"Takeo Miki" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.