HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Hingham, Massachusetts
HINGHAM is a town in metropolitan Greater Boston on the South Shore of the U.S. state of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
in northern Plymouth County . At the 2010 census , the population was 22,157. Hingham is known for its colonial history and location on Boston Harbor . The town was named after Hingham, Norfolk , England
England
, and was first settled by English colonists in 1633. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Geography * 3 Demographics * 4 Economy * 4.1 Top employers * 5 Government * 6 Infrastructure * 6.1 Education * 6.2 Transportation * 7 Notable people * 8 References * 9 External links HISTORYThe town of Hingham was dubbed "Bare Cove" by the first colonizing English in 1633, but two years later was incorporated as a town under the name "Hingham"
[...More...]

"Hingham, Massachusetts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Norfolk
NORFOLK (/ˈnɔːrfək/ ) is a county in East Anglia in England . It borders Lincolnshire to the west and north-west, Cambridgeshire to the west and southwest, and Suffolk to the south. Its northern and eastern boundaries are the North Sea and, to the north-west, The Wash . The county town is Norwich . With an area of 2,074 square miles (5,370 km2) and a population of 859,400, Norfolk is a largely rural county with a population density of 401 per square mile (155 per km²). Of the county's population, 40% live in four major built up areas: Norwich (213,000), Great Yarmouth (63,000), King\'s Lynn (46,000) and Thetford (25,000). The Broads is a network of rivers and lakes in the east of the county, extending south into Suffolk . The area is not a National Park although it is marketed as such
[...More...]

"Norfolk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Church Of England
The CHURCH OF ENGLAND (C OF E) is the state church of England . The Archbishop of Canterbury (currently Justin Welby ) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor . The Church of England is also the mother church of the international Anglican Communion . It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the third century, and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury . The English church renounced papal authority when Henry VIII failed to secure an annulment of his marriage to Catherine of Aragon in the 1530s. The English Reformation accelerated under Edward VI 's regents, before a brief restoration of papal authority under Queen Mary I and King Philip
[...More...]

"Church Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chancel
In church architecture , the CHANCEL is the space around the altar , including the choir and the sanctuary (sometimes called the PRESBYTERY), at the liturgical east end of a traditional Christian church building. It may terminate in an apse . It is generally the area used by the clergy and choir during worship, while the congregation is in the nave . Direct access may be provided by a PRIEST\'S DOOR, usually on the south side of the church. This is one definition, sometimes called the "strict" one; in practice in churches where the eastern end contains other elements such as an ambulatory and side chapels, these are also often counted as part of the chancel, especially when discussing architecture. In smaller churches, where the altar is backed by the outside east wall and there is no distinct choir, the chancel and sanctuary may be the same area. In churches with a retroquire area behind the altar, this may only be included in the broader definition of chancel
[...More...]

"Chancel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

England
ENGLAND is a country that is part of the United Kingdom . It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain (which lies in the North Atlantic ) in its centre and south; and includes over 100 smaller islands such as the Isles of Scilly , and the Isle of Wight . The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles , one of the Germanic tribes who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries
[...More...]

"England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

2010 United States Census
The 2010 UNITED STATES CENSUS, (known as "CENSUS 2010"), is the twenty-third and currently most recent United States national census . National Census Day , the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census . CONTENTS * 1 Introduction * 2 Major changes * 3 Cost * 4 Technology * 5 Marketing and undercounts * 6 Reapportionment * 7 Controversies * 7.1 _Clemons v. Department of Commerce_ * 8 State rankings * 9 Metropolitan rankings * 10 City rankings * 11 References * 12 External links INTRODUCTION President Obama completing his census form in the Oval Office on March 29, 2010. As required by the United States Constitution , the U.S. census has been conducted every 10 years since 1790
[...More...]

"2010 United States Census" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Geographic Names Information System
The GEOGRAPHIC NAMES INFORMATION SYSTEM (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer . GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded. Each feature receives a permanent, unique feature record identifier, sometimes called the GNIS identifier
[...More...]

"Geographic Names Information System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

U.S. State
A U.S. STATE is a constituent political entity of the United States of America . There are currently 50 states, which are bound together in a union with each other. Each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a defined geographic territory, and shares its sovereignty with the United States
United States
federal government . Due to the shared sovereignty between each state and the federal government, Americans
Americans
are citizens of both the federal republic and of the state in which they reside . State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states , except for persons covered by certain types of court orders (e.g., paroled convicts and children of divorced spouses who are sharing custody )
[...More...]

"U.S. State" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Magdalene College, Cambridge
Coordinates : 52°12′37″N 0°6′58″E / 52.21028°N 0.11611°E / 52.21028; 0.11611 MAGDALENE COLLEGE Cambridge University The Second Court of Magdalene College LOCATION Magdalene Street (map) FULL NAME The College of Saint Mary Magdalene MOTTO Garde ta Foy (Old French) MOTTO IN ENGLISH Keep your faith FOUNDERS John Lytlington, Abbot of Crowland (1428) Thomas, 1st Baron Audley (1542) ESTABLISHED 1428 Refounded 1542 NAMED FOR
[...More...]

"Magdalene College, Cambridge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

West Country
The WEST COUNTRY is a loosely defined area of south western England . The term usually encompasses the historic counties of Cornwall , Devon , Dorset , Somerset , and often the counties of Gloucestershire and Wiltshire . The region is host to distinctive regional dialects and accents . AREA BOUNDARIESApart from the Bristol Channel and English Channel , the West Country's boundaries are not precisely defined and as a consequence there are a number of different definitions used. Some definitions are roughly synonymous with the administrative South West Region , while others use it more specifically to refer to just the southwestern part. The term is also used, for example, to refer to sports matches between such cities as Bristol and Bath or Gloucester and Bath. West Country Carnival events take place in Somerset, Devon, Wiltshire and Dorset
[...More...]

"West Country" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

King's Lynn
KING\'S LYNN /ˌkɪŋz ˈlɪn/ , known until 1537 as BISHOP\'S LYNN, is a seaport and market town in Norfolk
Norfolk
, England, about 98 miles (158 km) north of London, 36 miles (58 km) north-east of Peterborough
Peterborough
, 44 miles (71 km) north north-east of Cambridge
Cambridge
and 44 miles (71 km) west of Norwich
Norwich
. The population of the town is 42,800. The town has two theatres (Westacre and Corn Exchange), two museums (Lynn Museum and True's Yard) and several other cultural and sporting venues. There are three secondary schools and one college. The service sector, information and communication technologies and creative industries provide employment for the population of King's Lynn
King's Lynn
and the surrounding area
[...More...]

"King's Lynn" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Wampanoag People
The WAMPANOAG /ˈwɑːmpənɔːɡ/ , also called MASSASOIT and also rendered WôPANâAK, is a Native American people in North America. They were a loose confederacy made up of several tribes. Many Wampanoag people today are enrolled in two federally recognized tribes , the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe and the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head , or four state-recognized tribes in Massachusetts . In the beginning of the 17th century, at the time of first contact with the English, the Wampanoag lived in southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island , a territory that encompassed present-day Martha\'s Vineyard and Nantucket islands. Their population numbered in the thousands due to the richness of the environment and their cultivation of corn, beans and squash. Three thousand Wampanoag lived on Martha's Vineyard alone
[...More...]

"Wampanoag People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States Census Bureau
The UNITED STATES CENSUS BUREAU (USCB; officially the BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System , responsible for producing data about the American people and economy . The Census
Census
Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States
United States
. The Census
Census
Bureau's primary mission is conducting the U.S. Census every ten years, which allocates the seats of the U.S. House of Representatives to the states based on their population. The Bureau's various censuses and surveys help allocate over $400 billion in federal funds every year and it helps states , local communities, and businesses make informed decisions
[...More...]

"United States Census Bureau" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Trainband
TRAINBANDS were companies of militia in England
England
or the Americas
Americas
, first organized in the 16th century and dissolved in the 18th. The term was used after this time to describe the London
London
militia. In the early American colonies the trainband was the most basic tactical unit. However, no standard company size ever existed and variations were wide. As population grew these companies were organized into regiments to allow better management. But trainbands were not combat units. Generally, upon reaching a certain age a man was required to join the local trainband in which he received periodic training for the next couple of decades. In wartime, military forces were formed by selecting men from trainbands on an individual basis and then forming them into a fighting unit . The exact derivation and usage is not clear. A nineteenth-century dictionary says, under "Train": "train-band, i.e
[...More...]

"Trainband" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dorset
DORSET /ˈdɔːrsᵻt/ (or archaically , DORSETSHIRE) is a county in South West England on the English Channel coast. The ceremonial county comprises the non-metropolitan county , which is governed by Dorset County Council , and the unitary authority areas of Poole and Bournemouth . Covering an area of 2,653 square kilometres (1,024 sq mi), Dorset borders Devon to the west, Somerset to the north-west, Wiltshire to the north-east, and Hampshire to the east. The county town is Dorchester which is in the south. After the reorganisation of local government in 1974 the county's border was extended eastward to incorporate the Hampshire towns of Bournemouth and Christchurch. Around half of the population lives in the South East Dorset conurbation , while the rest of the county is largely rural with a low population density
[...More...]

"Dorset" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dorchester, Massachusetts
DORCHESTER is a historic neighborhood comprising more than 6 square miles (16 km2) in Boston
Boston
, Massachusetts, United States. Originally, Dorchester was a separate town, founded by Puritans who emigrated in 1630 from Dorchester, Dorset
Dorchester, Dorset
, England. This dissolved municipality , Boston's largest neighborhood by far, is often divided by city planners in order to create two planning areas roughly equivalent in size and population to other Boston
Boston
neighborhoods. The neighborhood is named after the town of Dorchester in the English county of Dorset, from which Puritans emigrated on the ship Mary and John , among others and is today sometimes nicknamed "DOT" by its residents. Founded in 1630, just a few months before the founding of the city of Boston, Dorchester now covers a geographic area approximately equivalent to nearby Cambridge
[...More...]

"Dorchester, Massachusetts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo