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Hingham, Massachusetts
HINGHAM is a town in metropolitan Greater Boston on the South Shore of the U.S. state of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
in northern Plymouth County . At the 2010 census , the population was 22,157. Hingham is known for its colonial history and location on Boston Harbor . The town was named after Hingham, Norfolk
Hingham, Norfolk
, England
England
, and was first settled by English colonists in 1633. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Geography * 3 Demographics * 4 Economy * 4.1 Top employers * 5 Government * 6 Infrastructure * 6.1 Education * 6.2 Transportation * 7 Notable people * 8 References * 9 External links HISTORYThe town of Hingham was dubbed "Bare Cove" by the first colonizing English in 1633, but two years later was incorporated as a town under the name "Hingham". The land on which Hingham was settled was deeded to the English by the Wampanoag sachem Wompatuck in 1655. The town was within Suffolk
Suffolk
County from its founding in 1643 until 1803; and Plymouth County from 1803 to the present. The eastern part of the town split off to become Cohasset in 1770
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Hingham, Massachusetts (CDP)
HINGHAM is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Hingham in Plymouth County , Massachusetts
Massachusetts
, United States
United States
. The population was 5,650 at the 2010 census . GEOGRAPHYHingham is located at 42°14′14″N 70°53′13″W / 42.23722°N 70.88694°W / 42.23722; -70.88694 (42.237299, -70.887152). According to the United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau , the CDP has a total area of 8.2 km² (3.2 mi²), of which 8.1 km² (3.1 mi²) is land and 0.1 km² (0.04 mi²) (0.95%) is water. DEMOGRAPHICS See also: List of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
locations by per capita income As of the census of 2000, there were 22,157 people, 2,023 households, and 1,476 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 662.3/km² (1,714.3/mi²). There were 2,071 housing units at an average density of 256.3/km² (663.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.34% White , 0.15% Black or African American , 0.02% Native American , 0.39% Asian , 0.30% from other races , and 0.80% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.47% of the population. There were 2,023 households out of which 36.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.5% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.0% were non-families
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New England Town
New England ( United States ): * Connecticut * Maine * Massachusetts * New Hampshire * Rhode Island * Vermont FOUND IN U.S. states in New England CREATED BY Various colonial agreements followed by state constitutions CREATED 1620 (Plymouth, Massachusetts ) NUMBER More than 1,500 (as of 2016) POPULATIONS 41 (Hart\'s Location, New Hampshire ) - 68,318 (Framingham, Massachusetts ) AREAS 1.2 sq mi. (Nahant, Massachusetts ) - 291.2 sq mi. (Pittsburg, New Hampshire ) GOVERNMENT Town meeting _ This article NEEDS ADDITIONAL CITATIONS FOR VERIFICATION . Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources . Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2017)_ _(Learn how and when to remove this template message )_ _ This article POSSIBLY CONTAINS ORIGINAL RESEARCH . Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations . Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. (April 2017)_ _(Learn how and when to remove this template message )_The NEW ENGLAND TOWN (generally referred to simply as a TOWN in New England) is the basic unit of local government and local division of state authority in each of the six New England states and without a direct counterpart in most other U.S. states
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Old Ship Church
The OLD SHIP CHURCH (also known as the OLD SHIP MEETINGHOUSE) is a Puritan church built in 1681 in Hingham , Massachusetts
Massachusetts
. It is the only surviving 17th-century Puritan meetinghouse in America. Its congregation, gathered in 1635 and officially known as FIRST PARISH IN HINGHAM, occupies the oldest church building in continuous ecclesiastical use in the United States
United States
. On October 9, 1960, it was designated a National Historic Landmark and on November 15, 1966, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places . Old Ship Church
Old Ship Church
is, according to _ The New York Times _, "the oldest continuously worshiped-in church in North America and the only surviving example in this country of the English Gothic style of the 17th century. The more familiar delicately spired white Colonial churches of New England would not be built for more than half a century." Within the church, "the ceiling, made of great oak beams, looks like the inverted frame of a ship," notes _The Washington Post_. "Built in 1681, it is the oldest church in continuous use as a house of worship in North America." The most distinctive feature of the structure is its Hammerbeam roof , a Gothic open timber construction, the most well-known example that of Westminster Hall
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Geographic Coordinate System
A GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE SYSTEM is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position , and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position . A common choice of coordinates is latitude , longitude and elevation . To specify a location on a two-dimensional map requires a map projection
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List Of Countries
This LIST OF SOVEREIGN STATES provides an overview of sovereign states around the world , with information on their status and recognition of their sovereignty . Membership within the United Nations system divides the 206 listed states into three categories: 193 member states , two observer states , and 11 other states. The _sovereignty dispute_ column indicates states whose sovereignty is undisputed (190 states) and states whose sovereignty is disputed (16 states, out of which there are 6 member states, 1 observer state and 9 other states). Compiling a list such as this can be a difficult and controversial process, as there is no definition that is binding on all the members of the community of nations concerning the criteria for statehood . For more information on the criteria used to determine the contents of this list, please see the _criteria for inclusion _ section below. The list is intended to include entities that have been recognized to have _de facto_ status as sovereign states, and inclusion should not be seen as an endorsement of any specific claim to statehood in legal terms
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United States
Coordinates : 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America _ Flag Great Seal MOTTO: " In God We Trust " Other traditional mottos _ * " E pluribus unum " ( Latin
Latin
) (de facto) "Out of many, one" * " Annuit c
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Political Divisions Of The United States
POLITICAL DIVISIONS (also referred to as ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISIONS) OF THE UNITED STATES are the various recognized governing entities that together form the United States
United States
. The first-level political (administrative ) division of the United States
United States
is the state . There are 50 states, which are bound together in a union with each other. Each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a defined geographic territory, and shares its sovereignty with the United States
United States
federal government . According to numerous decisions of the United States Supreme Court , the 50 individual states and the United States
United States
as a whole are each sovereign jurisdictions. All state governments are modeled after the federal government and consist of three branches (although the three-branch structure is not Constitutionally required): executive , legislative , and judicial . They retain plenary power to make laws covering anything not preempted by the U.S. Constitution , federal statutes , or treaties ratified by the U.S. Senate , and are organized as presidential systems where the governor is both head of government and head of state (even though this too is not required). The various states are then typically subdivided into counties
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Massachusetts
MASSACHUSETTS /ˌmæsəˈtʃuːsᵻts/ (_ listen ) mass-ə-CHOO-sits_ or /ˌmæsəˈtʃuːzᵻts/ _mass-ə-CHOO-zits_ ; officially the COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS, is the most populous state in the New England region of the northeastern United States . It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the east, the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island to the south, New Hampshire and Vermont to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named for the Massachusett tribe, which once inhabited the area. The capital of Massachusetts and the most populous city in New England is Boston . Over 80% of Massachusetts' population lives in the Greater Boston metropolitan area, a region influential upon American history , academia , and industry . Originally dependent on agriculture, fishing and trade, Massachusetts was transformed into a manufacturing center during the Industrial Revolution . During the 20th century, Massachusetts' economy shifted from manufacturing to services. Modern Massachusetts is a global leader in biotechnology , engineering , higher education , finance , and maritime trade . Plymouth was the site of the first colony in New England, founded in 1620 by the Pilgrims , passengers of the _ Mayflower _
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List Of Counties In Massachusetts
This is a LIST OF THE 14 COUNTIES IN MASSACHUSETTS . Massachusetts has abolished eight of its fourteen county governments between 1997 and 2000; but the counties in the southeastern portion of the state retain county-level local government (Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Norfolk, Plymouth), or in one case ( Nantucket County ) combined county/town government. Vestigial judicial and law enforcement districts still follow county boundaries even in the counties whose county-level government has been disestablished, and the counties are still generally recognized as geographic entities if not political ones, along with continuing to provide geographical demarcation for National Weather Service weather warnings . Three counties (Hampshire, Barnstable, and Franklin) have formed new county regional compacts to serve as a form of regional governance. Jurisdictional areas for District Attorneys are created by state law and while some follow traditional county boundaries, names and geographic areas covered are often different
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Plymouth County, Massachusetts
PLYMOUTH COUNTY is a county in the U.S. state of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
. As of the 2010 census , the population was 494,919. Its county seats are Plymouth and Brockton . In 1685 the County was created by the Plymouth General Court , the legislature of Plymouth Colony , predating its annexation by the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay Colony . Plymouth County is part of the Boston
Boston
-Cambridge -Newton , MA-NH Metropolitan Statistical Area . CONTENTS* 1 Geography * 1.1 Adjacent counties * 1.2 National protected area * 2 Demographics * 2.1 2000 census * 2.2 2010 census * 2.3 Demographic breakdown by town * 2.3.1 Income * 3 Government and politics * 3.1 County seal * 4 Media * 5 Communities * 5.1 Cities * 5.2 Towns * 5.3 Census-designated places * 5.4 Other villages * 6 See also * 7 Footnotes * 8 Further reading * 9 External links GEOGRAPHYAccording to the U.S. Census Bureau , the county has a total area of 1,093 square miles (2,830 km2), of which 659 square miles (1,710 km2) is land and 434 square miles (1,120 km2) (40%) is water. It is the third-largest county in Massachusetts
Massachusetts
by total area
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Open Town Meeting
A TOWN MEETING is a form of direct democratic rule , used primarily in portions of the United States – principally in New England – since the 17th century, in which most or all the members of a community come together to legislate policy and budgets for local government. This is a town- or city-level meeting where decisions are made, in contrast with town hall meetings held by state and national politicians to answer questions from their constituents, which have no decision-making power
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Time Zone
A TIME ZONE is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Timezones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time(UTC) by a whole number of hours ( UTC−12to UTC+14), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (for example Newfoundland Standard Timeis UTC−03:30, NepalStandard Timeis UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Timeis UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour. Many land time zones are skewed toward the west of the corresponding nautical time zones . This also creates a permanent daylight saving time effect
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Eastern Standard Time Zone
The EASTERN TIME ZONE (ET) is a time zone encompassing 17 U.S. states in the eastern part of the contiguous United States , parts of eastern Canada
Canada
, the state of Quintana Roo
Quintana Roo
in Mexico
Mexico
, Panama
Panama
in Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. Places that use EASTERN STANDARD TIME (EST) when observing standard time (autumn/winter) are 5 hours behind Coordinated Universal Time (UTC−05:00 ). EASTERN DAYLIGHT TIME (EDT), when observing daylight saving time DST (spring/summer) is 4 hours behind Coordinated Universal Time (UTC−04:00 ). In the northern parts of the time zone, on the second Sunday in March, at 2:00 a.m. EST, clocks are advanced to 3:00 a.m. EDT leaving a one-hour "gap". On the first Sunday in November, at 2:00 a.m. EDT, clocks are moved back to 1:00 a.m. EST, thus "duplicating" one hour. Southern parts of the zone ( Panama
Panama
and the Caribbean) do not observe daylight saving time
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UTC-5
UTC−05:00 is a time offset that subtracts five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). In North America, it is observed in the Eastern Time Zone during standard time , and in the Central Time Zone during the other eight months (see Daylight saving time ). The western Caribbean uses it year round
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Daylight Saving Time
DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME (abbreviated DST), also sometimes erroneously referred to as DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time. American inventor and politician Benjamin Franklin proposed a form of daylight time in 1784. He wrote an essay "An Economical Project for Diminishing the Cost of Light" to the editor of _The Journal of Paris _, suggesting, somewhat jokingly, that Parisians could economize candle usage by getting people out of bed earlier in the morning, making use of the natural morning light instead. New Zealander George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895. The German Empire and Austria-Hungary organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916. Many countries have used it at various times since then, particularly since the energy crisis of the 1970s . The practice has both advocates and critics. Some early proponents of DST aimed to reduce evening use of incandescent lighting —once a primary use of electricity —today's heating and cooling usage patterns differ greatly, and research about how DST affects energy use is limited and contradictory
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