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Hinduism
ARTS * Bharatanatyam
Bharatanatyam
* Kathak * Kathakali
Kathakali
*
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Ārjava
ĀRJAVA (Sanskrit: आर्जव) literally means sincerity, straightness and non-hypocrisy. It is one of the ten Yamas in ancient Hindu and Jaina texts. CONTENTS * 1 Definition * 2 Literature * 3 See also * 4 References DEFINITIONĀrjava means straightness, sincerity and harmony in one’s thought, words and actions towards oneself and towards others. Kane translates arjava as straightforwardness. It is explained in ancient Indian texts as “self-restraint from hypocrisy", and "the absence of hypocrisy”. It is included as one of several ethical virtuous restraints in an individual's path to spirituality. The Maharashtrian poet Vāmana in Avigita, at xvi.1, posits arjava is a form of honesty and purity in a person, and an essential virtue so that one may treat everyone equally, whether that other is one’s child, wife, relative, friend, a stranger, someone hostile or oneself without any discrimination
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Raseśvara
VEDANTA * Advaita * Vishishtadvaita * Dvaita
Dvaita
Vedanta
Vedanta
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Asteya
ASTEYA is the Sanskrit term for "non-stealing". It is a virtue in Jainism and Hinduism . Asteya is considered as one of five yamas in the Yoga school of Hinduism, and as one of ten forms of temperance (virtuous self-restraint) in Indian philosophy. The practice of asteya demands that one must not steal, nor have the intent to steal another's property through action, speech and thoughts. CONTENTS* 1 Hinduism * 1.1 Literature * 1.2 Discussion * 1.3 Related concepts * 2 Jainism * 3 Difference between Asteya and Aparigraha * 4 References * 5 Sources HINDUISM Hinduism LITERATURE Asteya is defined in Hindu scripts as "the abstinence, in one's deeds or words or thoughts, from unauthorized appropriation of things of value from another human being"
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Vaisheshika
VEDANTA * Advaita * Vishishtadvaita * Dvaita Vedanta * Bhedabheda * Dvaitadvaita * Achintya Bheda Abheda *
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Vishishtadvaita
VISHISHTADVAITA ( IAST
IAST
Viśiṣṭādvaita ; Sanskrit : विशिष्टाद्वैत) is one of the most popular schools of the Vedanta
Vedanta
school of Hindu philosophy
Hindu philosophy
. Vedanta
Vedanta
literally means the end of the Vedas
Vedas
. VishishtAdvaita (literally "Advaita with uniqueness; qualifications") is a non-dualistic school of Vedanta philosophy. It is non-dualism of the qualified whole, in which Brahman alone exists, but is characterized by multiplicity. It can be described as qualified monism or qualified non-dualism or attributive monism . It is a school of Vedanta
Vedanta
philosophy which believes in all diversity subsuming to an underlying unity
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Charvaka
VEDANTA * Advaita * Vishishtadvaita * Dvaita
Dvaita
Vedanta
Vedanta
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Kama
KAMA ( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
, Pali
Pali
; Devanagari : काम) means "desire, wish, longing" in Indian literature. Kama
Kama
often connotes sexual desire and longing in contemporary literature, but the concept more broadly refers to any desire, wish, passion, longing, pleasure of the senses , the aesthetic enjoyment of life, affection, or love, with or without sexual connotations. Kama
Kama
is one of the four goals of human life in Hindu traditions. It is considered an essential and healthy goal of human life when pursued without sacrificing the other three goals: Dharma
Dharma
(virtuous, proper, moral life), Artha
Artha
(material prosperity, income security, means of life) and Moksha (liberation, release, self-actualization). Together, these four aims of life are called Puruṣārtha
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Pratyabhijna
Saiddhantika * Siddhantism Non - Saiddhantika * Kashmir Shaivism * Pratyabhijna * Vama * Dakshina * Kaula
Kaula
: Trika -Yamala -
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Pasupata
Saiddhantika * Siddhantism Non - Saiddhantika * Kashmir Shaivism
Shaivism
* Pratyabhijna
Pratyabhijna
* Vama * Dakshina *
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Karma
KARMA (/ˈkɑːrmə/ ; Sanskrit : कर्म, translit. karma, IPA: ( listen ); Pali : kamma) means action, work or deed; it also refers to the spiritual principle of cause and effect where intent and actions of an individual (cause) influence the future of that individual (effect). Good intent and good deed contribute to good karma and future happiness, while bad intent and bad deed contribute to bad karma and future suffering. Karma
Karma
is closely associated with the idea of rebirth in many schools of Indian religions . In these schools, karma in the present affects one's future in the current life, as well as the nature and quality of future lives - one's saṃsāra . With origins in ancient India, karma is a key concept in Hinduism , Buddhism
Buddhism
, Jainism
Jainism
, Sikhism , and Taoism
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Ahimsa
AHIMSA IAST : ahiṃsā, Pāli : avihiṃsā) means 'not to injure' and 'compassion' and refers to a key virtue in Indian religions . The word is derived from the Sanskrit root hiṃs – to strike; hiṃsā is injury or harm, a-hiṃsā is the opposite of this, i.e. cause no injury, do no harm. Ahimsa
Ahimsa
is also referred to as nonviolence , and it applies to all living beings—including all animals—in ancient Indian religions. Ahimsa
Ahimsa
is one of the cardinal virtues and an important tenet of Jainism
Jainism
, Hinduism
Hinduism
, and Buddhism
Buddhism
. Ahimsa
Ahimsa
is a multidimensional concept, inspired by the premise that all living beings have the spark of the divine spiritual energy; therefore, to hurt another being is to hurt oneself
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Mitahara
MITAHARA (Sanskrit: मिताहार, Mitāhāra) literally means the habit of moderate food. Mitahara is also a concept in Indian philosophy, particularly Yoga , that integrates awareness about food, drink, balanced diet and consumption habits and its effect on one’s body and mind. It is one of the ten yamas in ancient Indian texts. CONTENTS * 1 Definition * 2 Literature * 2.1 The virtue of mitahara * 2.2 Dietectics and mitahara * 3 Related concepts * 4 See also * 5 References DEFINITION Mitahara is a Sanskrit combination word, from Mita (मित, moderate) and Ahara (आहार, taking food, diet), which together mean moderate diet. In Yoga and other ancient texts, it represents a concept linking nutrition to the health of one’s body and mind
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Pāṇini
PāṇINI (~6th–4th century BCE ), or PANINI, is the name of an ancient Sanskrit
Sanskrit
linguist, grammarian, and a revered scholar in Hinduism
Hinduism
. Considered the father of Indian linguistics , Pāṇini likely lived in northwest Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
during the early Mahajanapada
Mahajanapada
era. Pāṇini
Pāṇini
is known for his text Ashtadhyayi, a sutra -style treatise on Sanskrit
Sanskrit
grammar , estimated to have been completed between 6th and 4th century BCE. His 3,959 verses on linguistics , syntax and semantics in "eight chapters" is the foundational text of the Vyākaraṇa branch of the Vedanga , the auxiliary scholarly disciplines of the Vedic period
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Santosha
SANTOSHA (skt. संतोष saṃtoṣa, santōṣḥ) literally means "contentment, satisfaction". It is also an ethical concept in Indian philosophy, particularly Yoga
Yoga
, where it is included as one of the Niyamas by Patanjali
Patanjali
. CONTENTS * 1 Definition * 2 Discussion * 3 Literature * 4 Mythology * 5 The desire paradox * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 Further reading DEFINITIONSantosha, sometimes spelled Santosa, is a combination word in Sanskrit, derived from Saṃ (सं, सम्) and Tosha (तोष, तुष्, tuṣh). SaM, means "completely", "altogether" or "entirely", and Tosha, "contentment", "satisfaction", "acceptance", "being comfortable". Combined, the word Santosha
Santosha
means "completely content with, or satisfied with, accepting and comfortable"
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Purusharthas
PURUṣāRTHA ( /pʊrʊʃɑːrθ/ , Sanskrit पुरुषार्थ) literally means an "object of human pursuit". It is a key concept in Hinduism, and refers to the four proper goals or aims of a human life. The four puruṣārthas are Dharma
Dharma
(righteousness, moral values), Artha
Artha
(prosperity, economic values), Kama
Kama
(pleasure, love, psychological values) and Moksha (liberation, spiritual values). All four Purusarthas are important, but in cases of conflict, Dharma is considered more important than Artha
Artha
or Kama
Kama
in Hindu
Hindu
philosophy. Moksha
Moksha
is considered the ultimate ideal of human life
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