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Hillsborough, NC
The town of Hillsborough is the county seat of Orange County, North Carolina.[4] The population was 6,087 in 2010.[5] Its name was unofficially shortened to "Hillsboro" during the 19th century, but was changed back to its original spelling in the late 1960s.Contents1 History1.1 Native-American history 1.2 Colonial period and Revolutionary War 1.3 The Antebellum Period and American Civil War 1.4 Historic sites1.4.1 Alexander Dickson House 1.4.2 Old Orange County Courthouse 1.4.3 Ayr Mount 1.4.4 The Inn at Teardrops 1.4.5 Margaret Lane Cemetery 1.4.6 Historic Occoneechee Speedway
Occoneechee Speed

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New Bern
New Bern /ˈnuːbərn/ is a city in Craven County, North Carolina, United States. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 29,524,[5] which had risen to an estimated 30,242 as of 2013.[6] It is the county seat of Craven County and the principal city of the New Bern Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is located at the confluence of the Neuse and the Trent rivers, near the North Carolina
North Carolina
coast. It lies 112 miles (180 km) east of Raleigh, 87 miles (140 km) northeast of Wilmington, and 162 miles (261 km) south of Norfolk. New Bern is the birthplace of Pepsi Cola. New Bern was settled in 1710 by Bernese and Palatine immigrants under the auspices of Christoph von Graffenried, 1st Baron of Bernberg
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Surveyor (surveying)
A surveyor at work with a retroreflector used for distance measurement and orientation. Surveying
Surveying
or land surveying is the technique, profession, and science of determining the terrestrial or three-dimensional positions of points and the distances and angles between them. A land surveying professional is called a land surveyor. These points are usually on the surface of the Earth, and they are often used to establish maps and boundaries for ownership, locations, such as building corners or the surface location of subsurface features, or other purposes required by government or civil law, such as property sales. Surveyors work with elements of geometry, trigonometry, regression analysis, physics, engineering, metrology, programming languages, and the law
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John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville
John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville, 7th Seigneur of Sark, KG, PC (/kɑːrtəˈrɛt/; 22 April 1690 – 2 January 1763), commonly known by his earlier title Lord Carteret, was a British statesman and Lord President of the Council from 1751 to 1763; he worked extremely closely with the Prime Minister
Prime Minister
of the country, Spencer Compton, Earl of Wilmington, in order to manage the various factions of the Government.[1][2]Contents1 Origins 2 Early life 3 Diplomat 4 Rivalry with Walpole 5 Americas 6 Queen Caroline 7 Secretary of State 8 Earl Granville 9 Marriages and progeny 10 Death and burial 11 Popular culture 12 Legacy 13 See also 14 References 15 Bibliography 16 External linksOrigins[edit] The family of Carteret was settled in the Channel Islands, and was of Norman descent
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British Empire
The British Empire
Empire
comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states. It originated with the overseas possessions and trading posts established by England
England
between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. At its height, it was the largest empire in history and, for over a century, was the foremost global power.[1] By 1913, the British Empire
Empire
held sway over 412 million people, 7001230000000000000♠23% of the world population at the time,[2] and by 1920, it covered 35,500,000 km2 (13,700,000 sq mi),[3] 7001240000000000000♠24% of the Earth's total land area.[4] As a result, its political, legal, linguistic and cultural legacy is widespread
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William Tryon
Lieutenant General William Tryon
William Tryon
(8 June 1729 – 27 January 1788) was a senior officer of the British Army
British Army
who served as the 39th Governor of New York. Prior to this he served as the eighth Governor of North Carolina, following the death of Arthur Dobbs.Contents1 Early life 2 Military career2.1 Seven Years' War 2.2 Governor of North Carolina (1765–1771) 2.3 Governor of New York (1771–1780)3 Later life 4 Legacy 5 Memorials 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Tryon was born 8 June 1729 at the family's seat at Norbury Park, Surrey, England
England
the son of Charles Tryon and Lady Mary Shirley. Military career[edit] In 1751, he entered the military as a lieutenant in the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards and was promoted to Captain in later that year. He had a daughter by Mary Stanton, whom he never married
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Piedmont (United States)
The Piedmont
Piedmont
is a plateau region located in the eastern United States. It sits between the Atlantic Coastal Plain
Atlantic Coastal Plain
and the main Appalachian Mountains, stretching from New Jersey
New Jersey
in the north to central Alabama in the south. The Piedmont
Piedmont
Province is a physiographic province of the larger Appalachian division which consists of the Gettysburg-Newark Lowlands, the Piedmont
Piedmont
Upland and the Piedmont
Piedmont
Lowlands sections.[1] The Atlantic Seaboard fall line marks the Piedmont's eastern boundary with the Coastal Plain. To the west, it is mostly bounded by the Blue Ridge Mountains, the easternmost range of the main Appalachians
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American Revolutionary War
Allied victory:Peace of Paris British recognition of American independence End of the First British Empire British retention of Canada
Canada
and GibraltarTerritorial changesGreat Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St
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War Of The Regulation
Herman Husband James Hunter James Few (POW) Charles Harrington † Benjamin Merrill (POW) William Tryon Hugh WaddellStrength2,300+ 1,500Casualties and lossesunknown unknownv t eWar of the RegulationYadkin River AlamanceThe War of the Regulation or the Regulator Movement was an uprising in the British North America's Carolina colonies, lasting from about 1765 to 1771, in which citizens took up arms against colonial officials. Though the rebellion did not change the power structure, some historians consider it a catalyst to the American Revolutionary War.Contents1 Causes of rebellion1.1 Population increase and new settlers arrive 1.2 Economic depression 1.3 Class war and political corruption 1.4 Regulators organize and arrival of Governor Tryo
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Taxes
A tax (from the Latin
Latin
taxo) is a mandatory financial charge or some other type of levy imposed upon a taxpayer (an individual or other legal entity) by a governmental organization in order to fund various public expenditures.[1] A failure to pay, or evasion of or resistance to taxation, is punishable by law. Taxes consist of direct or indirect taxes and may be paid in money or as its labour equivalent. Most countries have a tax system in place to pay for public/common/agreed national needs and government functions: some levy a flat percentage rate of taxation on personal annual income, some on a scale based on annual income amounts, and some countries impose almost no taxation at all, or a very low tax rate for a certain area of taxation
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Tryon Palace
The Governor's Palace, New Bern
Governor's Palace, New Bern
(also known as Tryon Palace), was the official residence and administrative headquarters of the colonial governors of North Carolina from 1770 to 1775. Located in New Bern, the palace was often at the center of state occasions and royal hospitality. The residence was seized by rebel troops in 1775. Shortly after the state capital was relocated to Raleigh in 1792, the main building burned to the ground. A modern recreation faithful to the original architect's plans and some period appropriate support structures were erected on the site in the 1950s and opened to the public in 1959. The palace garden was also recreated, with 16 acres (6.5 ha) of plantings, representing three centuries of landscape and gardening heritage
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Legislature
A legislature is a deliberative assembly with the authority to make laws for a political entity such as a country or city. Legislatures form important parts of most governments; in the separation of powers model, they are often contrasted with the executive and judicial branches of government. Laws enacted by legislatures are known as legislation. Legislatures observe and steer governing actions and usually have exclusive authority to amend the budget or budgets involved in the process. The members of a legislature are called legislators
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Claude J. Sauthier
Claude Joseph Sauthier (1736–1802) was an illustrator, draftsman, surveyor, and mapmaker. He was employed by the British colonial government in the American colonies prior to and during the American Revolutionary War.Contents1 Early life 2 Arrival in North Carolina 3 Later life 4 DeathEarly life[edit] Sauthier was born November 10, 1736 in Strasbourg, France. His early training was as an illustrator and draftsman, and his influences were the master garden designers Dezallier d'Argenville and Jean-Baptiste Alexandre Le Blond. Several of Sauthier’s works from the 1750s are archived in the library of the Grand Seminaire de Strasbourg. In 1763, Sauthier wrote A Treatis on Public Architecture and Garden Planning. Arrival in North Carolina[edit] Sauthier migrated to America in 1767 at the request of British royal Governor of North Carolina William Tryon
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Militia
A militia /mɪˈlɪʃə/[1] is generally an army or some other fighting organization of non-professional soldiers, citizens of a nation, or subjects of a state, who can be called upon for military service during a time of need, as opposed to a professional force of regular, full-time military personnel, or historically, members of a warrior nobility class (e.g., knights or samurai). Generally unable to hold ground against regular forces, it is common for militias to be used for aiding regular troops by skirmishing, holding fortifications, or irregular warfare, instead of being used in offensive campaigns by themselves
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Battle Of Alamance
The Battle of Alamance was the final battle of the War of the Regulation, a rebellion in colonial North Carolina over issues of taxation and local control. Some historians in the late nineteenth-early twentieth centuries considered the battle to be the opening salvo of the American Revolution,[1] and locals agreed with this assessment.[2] Yet, this has been questioned by present-day historians arguing that the Regulators (though viewed in the eyes of the royal governor and his allies as being in rebellion against King, country, and law) were not intending a complete overthrow of His Majesty's Government in North Carolina. They were only standing up against those certain local officials who had become corrupt and unworthy tools of the King, and they only turned to riot and armed rebellion as a last resort when all other peaceful means through petitions, elections to the Assembly, etc. had failed to redress their grievances
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