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Hieronymus De Zentis
Girolamo Zenti
Girolamo Zenti
(Viterbo c.1609 - Paris
Paris
c.1666) (also: Girolama de Zenti, Gerolamo de Sentis, Hieronymus de Zentis) was an Italian harpsichord maker and organ builder in the 17th century. He is known as the probable inventor of the bentside spinet and for having traveled unusually extensively to practice his trade at the courts of Europe, including Rome, Florence, Paris, London
London
and Stockholm.[1][2]Contents1 Biography 2 Zenti and the bentside spinet 3 Surviving instruments 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksBiography[edit] Information on Zentis life is fragmentary and spread wide. Zenti was born in Viterbo, near Rome, and was registered as an instrument maker in the papal capital by 1638. He was apprentice to Giovani Battista Boni, and took over the workshop at the latter's death in 1641
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Spinet
A spinet is a smaller type of harpsichord or other keyboard instrument, such as a piano or organ.Contents1 Spinets as harpsichords1.1 History 1.2 Other uses of "spinet" for harpsichords 1.3 Nomenclature2 Spinets as pianos2.1 History3 Spinets as organs 4 Notes 5 References5.1 Harpsichord
Harpsichord
spinet 5.2 Piano
Piano
spinet6 External linksSpinets as harpsichords[edit]Domenico Scarlatti: Sonata in F Minor K.69Performed on a spinet by Ulrich MetznerProblems playing this file? See media help.When the term spinet is used to designate a harpsichord, typically what is meant is the bentside spinet, described in this section. For other uses, see below. The bentside spinet shares most of its characteristics with the full-size instrument, including action, soundboard, and case construction
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Deutsches Museum
The Deutsches Museum
Deutsches Museum
(German Museum) in Munich, Germany, is the world's largest museum of science and technology, with about 28,000 exhibited objects from 50 fields of science and technology.[1] It receives about 1.5 million visitors per year. The museum was founded on 28 June 1903, at a meeting of the Association of German Engineers (VDI) as an initiative of Oskar von Miller. Its official name is Deutsches Museum
Deutsches Museum
von Meisterwerken der Naturwissenschaft und Technik (English: German Museum of Masterpieces of Science and Technology). It is the largest museum in Munich
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Hatchlands Park
Hatchlands Park
Hatchlands Park
is a red-brick country house with surrounding gardens in East Clandon, Surrey, England, covering 170 hectares (430 acres). It is located near Guildford
Guildford
along the A246 between West Clandon
West Clandon
and West Horsley. Hatchlands Park
Hatchlands Park
has been a Grade I listed property since 1967.[1]Contents1 History 2 The interior 3 Cobbe Collection 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The park initially belonged to the Chertsey Abbey
Chertsey Abbey
with the park being mentioned in the Domesday Book
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Julian Perkins
Julian Perkins is a British conductor and keyboard player (harpsichord, fortepiano and clavichord).[1] He is Founder Director of the early music ensemble Sounds Baroque and Artistic Director Designate of Cambridge Handel Opera Company.[2] He is rare among his counterparts in having also performed professionally as a singer, violinist and recorder player at the start of his career
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Giovanni Batista Giusti (harpsichord Maker)
Giovanni Battista Giusti (c1624 - c1693) was a musical-instrument maker. He was a student first of Giovani Battista Boni, then Girolamo Zenti. He lived in Lucca, Italy.[1] References[edit]^ Kottick, Edward L. A History of the Harpsichord. Vol. 1. Indiana University Press, 2003. p139External links[edit]Museum Nord; Harpsichord by Giovanni Battista GiustiThis Italy-related article is a stub
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List Of Historical Harpsichord Makers
This page presents a graphical timelines, listing historical makers of the harpsichord and related instruments such as the virginal, spinet and clavicytherium. The makers are grouped according to which regional building tradition they belong.Contents1 Graphical timeline overview1.1 Notes on overview2 Italian makers 3 Flemish makers 4 German makers 5 See also 6 References 7 External links 8 SourcesGraphical timeline overview[edit] Below is an overview of arguably the most important harpsichord makers whose names are known today, but the list is by no means exhaustive. Some of those listed were founders and members of influential harpsichord building dynasties. Others are known only through one or two instruments that have serendipitously survived, but are included because these instruments have proven a popular inspiration to modern builders who copy them
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Leopoldo Franciolini
Leopoldo Franciolini
Leopoldo Franciolini
(1844–1920) was an Italian antique dealer who flourished in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He is remembered as a fraudster who sold faked and altered historical musical instruments. To this day his work is a barrier to the scholarly study of instruments of the past.Contents1 Career1.1 The character of the fraudulent instruments 1.2 Clientele 1.3 His arrest and prosecution 1.4 The Franciolini business in later years2 Coping with Franciolini frauds in modern times2.1 Museums and curators 2.2 Scholars 2.3 Dealers and auction houses3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksCareer[edit]This clavicytherium, sold by Franciolini and kept in the Hans Adler Collection of Musical Instruments today,[1] is unlike any authentically attested instrument of this kind. It formed part of the prosecution's evidence in Franciolini's criminal trial; see below.Little is known about Franciolini's life
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Organology
Organology (from Greek: ὄργανον – organon, "instrument" and λόγος – logos, "study") is the science of musical instruments and their classification.[1] It embraces study of instruments' history, instruments used in different cultures, technical aspects of how instruments produce sound, and musical instrument classification. There is a degree of overlap between organology, ethnomusicology (being subsets of musicology) and the branch of the science of acoustics devoted to musical instruments.Contents1 History 2 Outside Perspectives on the Sachs-Hornbostel Classification System 3 Alternative Perspectives on the Classification of Musical Instruments 4 Connections to Ethnomusicology 5 Prominent organologists5.1 Ethno-organologists6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] A number of ancient cultures left documents detailing the musical instruments used and their role in society; these documents sometimes included a classification system
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Munich
Munich
Munich
(/ˈmjuːnɪk/; German: München, pronounced [ˈmʏnçn̩] ( listen),[2] Austro-Bavarian: Minga [ˈmɪŋ(ː)ɐ]) is the capital and the most populated city in the German state of Bavaria, on the banks of the River Isar
Isar
north of the Bavarian Alps
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Rome
Rome
Rome
(/roʊm/ ROHM; Italian: Roma i[ˈroːma]; Latin: Roma [ˈroːma]) is the capital of Italy
Italy
and a special comune (named Comune
Comune
di Roma Capitale). Rome
Rome
also serves as the capital of the Lazio
Lazio
region. With 2,874,558 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi),[1] it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth-most populous city in the European Union
European Union
by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4.3 million residents.[2] Rome
Rome
is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber
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Metropolitan Museum Of Art
www.metmuseum.orgThe Metropolitan Museum of ArtU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesU.S. National Historic LandmarkElevation by Simon FieldhouseBuilt 1874; 144 years ago (1874)Architect Richard Morris Hunt; also Calvert Vaux; Jacob Wrey MouldArchitectural style Beaux-ArtsNRHP reference # 86003556Significant datesAdded to NRHP January 29, 1972[5]Designated NHLJune 24, 1986[6] [7]The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Metropolitan Museum of Art
of New York, colloquially "the Met",[a] is the largest art museum in the United States. With 7.06 million visitors in 2016, it was the second most visited art museum in the world, and the fifth most visited museum of any kind. [8] Its permanent collection contains over two million works,[9] divided among seventeen curatorial departments
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Cristofori
Bartolomeo Cristofori di Francesco (Italian pronunciation: [bartoloˈmɛːo kriˈstɔːfori di franˈtʃesko]; May 4, 1655 – January 27, 1731) was an Italian maker of musical instruments, generally regarded as the inventor of the piano.Contents1 Life1.1 Earlier instruments 1.2 The first appearance of the piano 1.3 Later life2 Cristofori's pianos2.1 Design2.1.1 Action 2.1.2 Hammers 2.1.3 Frame 2.1.4 Inverted wrest plank 2.1.5 Soundboard 2.1.6 Strings2.2 Sound 2.3 Initial reception of the piano3 Surviving instruments 4 Assessments of Cristofori 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksLife[edit] The available source materials on Cristofori's life include his birth and death records, two wills, the bills he submitted to his employers, and a single interview carried out by Scipione Maffei. From the latter, both Maffei's notes and the published journal article are preserved. Cristofori was born in Padua in the Republic of Venice
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Charles II Of England
Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685)[c] was king of England, Scotland and Ireland. He was king of Scotland from 1649 until his deposition in 1651, and king of England, Scotland and Ireland from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 until his death. Charles II's father, Charles I, was executed at Whitehall on 30 January 1649, at the climax of the English Civil War. Although the Parliament of Scotland
Parliament of Scotland
proclaimed Charles II king on 5 February 1649, England entered the period known as the English Interregnum or the English Commonwealth, and the country was a de facto republic, led by Oliver Cromwell. Cromwell defeated Charles II at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651, and Charles fled to mainland Europe. Cromwell became virtual dictator of England, Scotland and Ireland, and Charles spent the next nine years in exile in France, the Dutch Republic and the Spanish Netherlands
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