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Heron Tower
Coordinates: 51°30′58″N 0°4′51″W / 51.51611°N 0.08083°W / 51.51611; -0.08083Heron TowerGeneral informationStatus CompleteType CommercialLocation London, EC2 United KingdomConstruction started 2007Completed 2011HeightAntenna spire 230 metres (755 ft)[1]Roof 202 metres (663 ft)[2]DimensionsOther dimensions 2,400-square-metre (26,000 sq ft) siteTechnical detailsFloor count 46 [3]Floor area 461,478 sq ft (43,000 m2)[3]Design and constructionArchitect Kohn Pedersen FoxStructural engineer ArupMain contractor SkanskaWebsitehttp://www.salesforce-tower.comThe lobby features a 70,000-litre aquarium containing hundreds of fish. The Heron
The Heron
Tower (officially 110 Bishopsgate) is a commercial skyscraper in London
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Great Recession
The Great Recession
Recession
was a period of general economic decline observed in world markets during the late 2000s and early 2010s. The scale and timing of the recession varied from country to country.[1][2] In terms of overall impact, the International Monetary Fund
International Monetary Fund
concluded that it was the worst global recession since the 1930s (the Great Depression).[3][4] The causes of the recession largely originated in the United States, particularly related to the real-estate market, though choices made by other nations contributed as well. According to the U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research (the official arbiter of U.S. recessions) the recession, as experienced in that country, began in December 2007 and ended in June 2009, thus extending over 19 months.[5] The Great Recession
Recession
was related to the financial crisis of 2007–08 and U.S
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BREEAM
BREEAM ( Building Research Establishment
Building Research Establishment
Environmental Assessment Method), first published by the Building Research Establishment
Building Research Establishment
(BRE) in 1990,[1] is the world's longest established method of assessing, rating, and certifying the sustainability of buildings. More than 250,000 buildings have been BREEAM-certified and over a million are registered for certification – in more than 50 countries worldwide. BREEAM also has a tool which focuses on neighborhood development.Contents1 Purpose 2 History 3 Scope 4 National Operators 5 The cost and value of sustainability 6 References 7 External linksPurpose[edit] BREEAM is an assessment using scientifically based Sustainability metrics and indices that covers a range of environmental issues
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Renewable Energy
Renewable energy
Renewable energy
is energy that is collected from renewable resources, which are naturally replenished on a human timescale, such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, waves, and geothermal heat.[2] Renewable energy often provides energy in four important areas: electricity generation, air and water heating/cooling, transportation, and rural (off-grid) energy services.[3] Based on REN21's 2016 report, renewables contributed 19.2% to humans' global energy consumption and 23.7% to their generation of electricity in 2014 and 2015, respectively. This energy consumption is divided as 8.9% coming from traditional biomass, 4.2% as heat energy (modern biomass, geothermal and solar heat), 3.9% hydro electricity and 2.2% is electricity from wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass
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Photovoltaics
Photovoltaics
Photovoltaics
(PV) is a term which covers the conversion of light into electricity using semiconducting materials that exhibit the photovoltaic effect, a phenomenon studied in physics, photochemistry, and electrochemistry. A typical photovoltaic system employs solar panels, each comprising a number of solar cells, which generate electrical power
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Fahd Of Saudi Arabia
Fahd bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques
Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques
(Arabic: فهد بن عبد العزيز آل سعود‎ Fahd ibn ‘Abd al-‘Azīz Āl Sa‘ūd; 16 March 1921[1][2] – 1 August 2005) was King of Saudi Arabia
King of Saudi Arabia
from 1982 to 2005. One of 45 sons of Saudi founder Ibn Saud, and the fourth of his six sons who have ruled the Kingdom (Saud, Faisal, Khalid, Fahd, Abdullah and Salman), Fahd ascended to the throne on the death of his half-brother King Khalid on 13 June 1982. Fahd was appointed Crown Prince when Khalid succeeded his half-brother King Faisal, who was assassinated in 1975. Fahd was viewed as the de facto Prime Minister during King Khalid's reign in part due to the latter's ill health. Fahd suffered a debilitating stroke in 1995, after which he was unable to continue performing his full official duties
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Abdul Aziz Bin Fahd
Abdul Aziz bin Fahd (Arabic: عبدالعزيز بن فهد بن عبد العزيز آل سعود‎) is a Saudi Arabian Prince and member of the Royal House of Saud.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Professional experience 3 Business activities 4 Alliances 5 Fortune 6 Personal life 7 2017 purge 8 Ancestry 9 References 10 External linksEarly life and education[edit] His mother is Al Jawhara bint Ibrahim Al Ibrahim, belonging to the wealthy Al Ibrahim family.[1] Abdul Aziz bin Fahd received a bachelor of arts degree in administrative sciences from King Saud University.[2] Professional experience[edit] Prince Abdul Aziz was first appointed as minister of state without portfolio in May 1998.[3] Then, he was made head of the Office of the Council of Ministers in January 2000, when he was 28 years old.[4] It was reported that after King Fahd's death, he began to live in Switzerland and came to Saudi Arabia to participate in the meetings of the Council of Ministers.[
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The Times
The Times
The Times
is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England. It began in 1785 under the title The Daily Universal Register, adopting its current name on 1 January 1788. The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
(founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers, since 1981 a subsidiary of News UK, itself wholly owned by News Corp
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Tower Crane
A crane is a type of machine, generally equipped with a hoist rope, wire ropes or chains, and sheaves, that can be used both to lift and lower materials and to move them horizontally. It is mainly used for lifting heavy things and transporting them to other places. The device uses one or more simple machines to create mechanical advantage and thus move loads beyond the normal capability of a human. Cranes are commonly employed in the transport industry for the loading and unloading of freight, in the construction industry for the movement of materials, and in the manufacturing industry for the assembling of heavy equipment. The first known construction cranes were invented by the Ancient Greeks and were powered by men or beasts of burden, such as donkeys. These cranes were used for the construction of tall buildings. Larger cranes were later developed, employing the use of human treadwheels, permitting the lifting of heavier weights
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John Prescott
John Leslie Prescott, Baron Prescott (born 31 May 1938) is a British politician who was the Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1997 to 2007. Born in Prestatyn, Wales, he represented Hull East as the Labour member of parliament from 1970 to 2010. In the 1994 leadership election, he stood for both Leader and Deputy Leader of the Labour Party, winning election to the latter office. He was appointed Deputy Prime Minister after Labour's victory in the 1997 election, with an expanded brief as Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions. A former ship's steward and trade union activist, by the 1990s he was presented as the political link to the working class in a Labour party increasingly led by modernising, middle-class professionals such as Tony Blair
Tony Blair
and Peter Mandelson
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Deputy Prime Minister Of The United Kingdom
The Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
(DPM) is a senior member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom. The office of the Deputy Prime Minister is not a permanent position[1], existing only at the discretion of the Prime Minister, who may appoint to other offices – such as First Secretary of State
First Secretary of State
– to give seniority to a particular cabinet minister. Unlike analogous offices in some other nations, such as a vice-presidency, the British deputy prime minister possesses no special constitutional powers as such, though they will always have particular responsibilities in government
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Public Inquiry
A tribunal of inquiry is an official review of events or actions ordered by a government body. In many common law countries, such as the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia
Australia
and Canada, such a public inquiry differs from a Royal Commission in that a public inquiry accepts evidence and conducts its hearings in a more public forum and focuses on a more specific occurrence. Interested members of the public and organisations may not only make (written) evidential submissions as is the case with most inquiries, but also listen to oral evidence given by other parties. Typical events for a public inquiry are those that cause multiple deaths, such as public transport crashes or mass murders
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English Heritage
English Heritage
English Heritage
(officially the English Heritage
English Heritage
Trust) is a registered charity that manages the National Heritage Collection.[3] This comprises over 400 of England's historic buildings, monuments and sites spanning more than 5,000 years of history. Within its portfolio are Stonehenge, Dover Castle, Tintagel Castle
Tintagel Castle
and the best preserved parts of Hadrian's Wall
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Waterloo Bridge
(first bridge) 18 June 1817 (18 June 1817) (second bridge) 11 March 1942; 76 years ago (11 March 1942) Waterloo Bridge
Waterloo Bridge
(/ˌwɔːtərˈluː/[1]) is a road and foot traffic bridge crossing the River Thames
River Thames
in London, between Blackfriars Bridge and Hungerford Bridge. Its name commemorates the victory of the British, the Dutch and the Prussians at the Battle of Waterloo
Battle of Waterloo
in 1815
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Lord Mayor Of London
The Lord Mayor of London
Mayor of London
is the City of London's mayor and leader of the City of London
City of London
Corporation
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