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Barrowford

Barrowford (/ˌbærˈfɔːrd/) is a large village and civil parish in the Pendle district of Lancashire, England. It is situated to the north of Nelson on the other side of the M65 motorway, and forms part of the Nelson conurbation. It also comprises the area of Lowerford (not to be confused with its neighbour Higherford). The parish has a population of 6,171.[1] Barrowford is situated on the MarsdenGisburnLong Preston turnpike. One of the original toll houses, dating from 1804–05, can still be seen at the junction with the road to Colne, complete with a reproduction of the table of tolls which were paid. The toll house was restored in the 1980s and is owned by the trust which operates nearby Pendle Heritage Centre
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Lancashire County Council

Lancashire County Council is the upper-tier local authority for the non-metropolitan county of Lancashire, England. It consists of 84 councillors. After the 2017 Lancashire County Council election, the council is under Conservative control, having been under no overall control from 2013–17 and under Conservative control from 2009-13. Prior to the 2009 Lancashire County Council election, the county had been under Labour control since 1985. The Council leader, County Councillor Geoff Driver, chairs a cabinet of eight councillors - the others being A Atkinson, P Buckley, S Charles, G Gooch, M Green, K Iddon (Deputy Leader), S Turner and P Williamson. The eight cabinet members each have responsibility for particular functions of the council
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Standish Hall
Standish Hall was an estate and country house, built in 1573, owned by the Standish family in the south-west of Standish, Wigan. No standing structures of the hall remain on the former estate, however, some of its wooden-panel interiors are preserved elsewhere. The original building was a Wattle and daub H-shaped building constructed in 1574. In 1684 a wing to the north built of brick was added and during the same time many alterations were made to the original house. In 1748 another three-story brick wing was added to the west. The moat, which surrounded the house was filled up in 1780. A final extension further west was added in 1822.[1] By the late-19th-century the hall stood in extensive parkland with forests, grasslands and large fishponds. The hall and its Roman Catholic chapel were at the centre of the estate, which had a series of interconnecting path systems and possibly a ha-ha to the south
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