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Herbert Marshall
Herbert Brough Falcon Marshall (23 May 1890 – 22 January 1966) was an English stage, screen and radio actor who, in spite of losing a leg during the First World War, starred in many popular and well-regarded Hollywood films in the 1930s and 1940s. After a successful theatrical career in the United Kingdom and North America, he became an in-demand Hollywood leading man, frequently appearing in romantic melodramas and occasional comedies. In his later years, he turned to character acting. The son of actors, Marshall is best remembered for roles in Ernst Lubitsch's Trouble in Paradise (1932), Alfred Hitchcock's Murder! (1930) and Foreign Correspondent (1940), William Wyler's The Letter (1940) and The Little Foxes (1941), Albert Lewin's The Moon and Sixpence (1942), Edmund Goulding's The Razor's Edge
The Razor's Edge
(1946), and Kurt Neumann's The Fly (1958)
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Noël Coward
Sir Noël Peirce Coward (16 December 1899 – 26 March 1973) was an English playwright, composer, director, actor and singer, known for his wit, flamboyance, and what Time magazine called "a sense of personal style, a combination of cheek and chic, pose and poise".[1] Born in Teddington, south-west London, Coward attended a dance academy in London as a child, making his professional stage début at the age of eleven. As a teenager he was introduced into the high society in which most of his plays would be set. Coward achieved enduring success as a playwright, publishing more than 50 plays from his teens onwards. Many of his works, such as Hay Fever, Private Lives, Design for Living, Present Laughter
Present Laughter
and Blithe Spirit, have remained in the regular theatre repertoire
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Accounting Clerk
Bookkeeping is the recording of financial transactions, and is part of the process of accounting in business.[1] Transactions include purchases, sales, receipts, and payments by an individual person or an organization/corporation. There are several standard methods of bookkeeping, such as the single-entry bookkeeping system and the double-entry bookkeeping system, but, while they may be thought of as "real" bookkeeping, any process that involves the recording of financial transactions is a bookkeeping process. Bookkeeping is usually performed by a bookkeeper. A bookkeeper (or book-keeper) is a person who records the day-to-day financial transactions of a business. They are usually responsible for writing the daybooks, which contain records of purchases, sales, receipts, and payments
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Hollywood Walk Of Fame
Hollywood/Vine Hollywood/HighlandWebsite Official website Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Historic-Cultural MonumentDesignated July 5, 1978Reference no. 194The Hollywood
Hollywood
Walk of Fame comprises more than 2,600[1] five-pointed terrazzo and brass stars embedded in the sidewalks along 15 blocks of Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood Boulevard
and three blocks of Vine Street
Vine Street
in Hollywood, California. The stars are permanent public monuments to achievement in the entertainment industry, bearing the names of a mix of actors, musicians, directors, producers, musical and theatrical groups, fictional characters, and others. The Walk of Fame is administered by the Hollywood
Hollywood
Chamber of Commerce and maintained by the self-financing Hollywood
Hollywood
Historic Trust
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Edward Wollstonecraft
Edward Wollstonecraft (1783-1832) was a successful businessman in early colonial Australia. He was the nephew of the early feminist Mary Wollstonecraft and cousin to Mary Wollstonecraft
Mary Wollstonecraft
Shelley, the author of Frankenstein.Contents1 Life 2 Death and legacy 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] In 1812, while travelling from Lisbon
Lisbon
to Cadiz, he met Alexander Berry,[1] with whom he later formed a trading partnership, intending to operate in the colony of New South Wales
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Mary Wollstonecraft
Mary
Mary
Wollstonecraft (/ˈwʊlstən.krɑːft/; 27 April 1759 – 10 September 1797) was an English writer, philosopher, and advocate of women's rights. During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children's book. Wollstonecraft is best known for A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792), in which she argues that women are not naturally inferior to men, but appear to be only because they lack education. She suggests that both men and women should be treated as rational beings and imagines a social order founded on reason. Until the late 20th century, Wollstonecraft's life, which encompassed several unconventional personal relationships, received more attention than her writing
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Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (née Godwin; 30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus (1818). She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin, and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft. After Wollstonecraft's death less than a month after her daughter Mary was born, Mary was raised by Godwin, who was able to provide his daughter with a rich, if informal, education, encouraging her to adhere to his own liberal political theories. When Mary was four, her father married a neighbour, with whom, as her stepmother, Mary came to have a troubled relationship.[2][3] In 1814, Mary began a romance with one of her father's political followers, Percy Bysshe Shelley, who was already married
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Frankenstein
Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus
Prometheus
is a novel written by English author Mary Shelley
Mary Shelley
(1797–1851) that tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who creates a grotesque but sapient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment
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Lionel Brough
Lionel Brough
Lionel Brough
(10 March 1836 – 9 November 1909) was a British actor and comedian. After beginning a journalistic career and performing as an amateur, he became a professional actor, performing mostly in Liverpool
Liverpool
during the mid-1860s. He established his career in London as a member of the company at the new Queen's Theatre, Long Acre
Queen's Theatre, Long Acre
in 1867, and he soon became known for his roles in Shakespeare, contemporary comedies, and classics, especially as Tony Lumpkin
Tony Lumpkin
in She Stoops to Conquer. In the 1870s and 1880s, Brough was one of the leading comic actors in London. Although untrained musically, he also appeared in several successful operettas in the 1880s and 1890s
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Old Harlow
Old Harlow is the historic part of the new town and district of Harlow, Essex in England.Old Harlow water trainsTrain station in Old Harlow12th century beams in Harlowsbury ChapelOld Harlow is situated in the north-east area of the town and is the oldest area of the town. Old Harlow pre-dates the first written record in the Domesday Book of 1086, so it is unknown when the town first came into existence. Originally Old Harlow was going to be the central area of Harlow New Town, but due to the amount of demolition works and the loss of agricultural land it was decided to build Harlow New Town to the west of Old Harlow. As Harlow New Town was being built, Old Harlow seemed to be forgotten and fell behind in its development. It was not until 1977 that Old Harlow was improved with the building of a health service and a senior citizens day centre
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Essex
Essex
Essex
/ˈɛsɪks/ is a county in the East of England. Immediately north east of London, it is one of the home counties. It borders the counties of Suffolk
Suffolk
and Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the north, Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
to the west, Kent
Kent
across the estuary of the River Thames
River Thames
to the south and London
London
to the south-west. The county town is Chelmsford, which is the only city in the county. Essex
Essex
occupies the eastern part of the former Kingdom of Essex, which subsequently united with the other Anglian and Saxon
Saxon
kingdoms to make England
England
a single nation state
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Western Front (World War I)
Decisive Entente victoryArmistice of Compiègne, end of World War I Central Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified, fall of the German EmpireBelligerentsEntente Powers: France French colonial empire British Empire Australia  Bermuda Canada  India  Newfoundland New Zealand  Southern Rhodesia  South Africa  United Kingdom  United States
United States
(from 1917)  Belgium  Italy (from 1915) Portugal
Portugal
(from 1916) Russian Empire (1916–17) Siam
Siam
(from 1918) Brazil
Brazil
(from 1918)Central Powers:  German Empire  Austria-HungaryCommanders and leaders Joseph Joffre Robert Nivelle Philippe Pétain Ferdinand Foch John French Douglas Haig John J
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Gossip Columns
A gossip columnist is someone who writes a gossip column in a newspaper or magazine, especially a gossip magazine. Gossip columns are material written in a light, informal style, which relates the gossip columnist's opinions about the personal lives or conduct of celebrities from show business (motion picture movie stars, theater, and television actors), politicians, professional sports stars, and other wealthy people or public figures
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Sniper
A sniper is a military/paramilitary marksman who operates to maintain effective visual contact with the enemy and engage targets from concealed positions or at distances exceeding their detection capabilities.[1] Snipers generally have specialized training and are equipped with high-precision rifles and high-magnification optics, and often feed information back to their units or command headquarters. In addition to marksmanship and long range shooting, military snipers are trained in a variety of tactical techniques: detection, stalking, and target range estimation methods, camouflage, field craft, infiltration, special reconnaissance and observation, surveillance and target acquisition.Contents1 Etymology 2 Modern warfare2.1 Military
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Second Battle Of Arras
 British Empire United Kingdom  Canada  Australia  Newfoundland  New Zealand  South Africa German EmpireCommanders and leaders Douglas Haig Edmund Allenby Hubert Gough Henry Horne Erich Ludendorff Ludwig von FalkenhausenStrengthfirst day: 14 divisions in the assault 9 divisions in reserve first day: 12 divisions in the line 5 divisions in reserveCasualties and losses158,000 120,000–130,000v t eNivelle Offensive, 1917BattlesArras Vimy
Vimy
Ridge2nd Aisne 3rd Champagne (The Hills)Other engagements
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Prosthetic
In medicine, a prosthesis (plural: prostheses; from Ancient Greek prosthesis, "addition, application, attachment"[1]) is an artificial device that replaces a missing body part, which may be lost through trauma, disease, or congenital conditions. Prosthetics are intended to restore the normal functions of the missing body part.[2] Prosthetic amputee rehabilitation is primarily coordinated by a prosthetist and an inter-disciplinary team of health care professionals including psychiatrists, surgeons, physical therapists, and occupational therapists
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