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Herb Leszczyński
Leszczyński (plural: Leszczyńscy, feminine form: Leszczyńska) was a prominent Polish noble family
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Voivode
Voivode (/ˈvɔɪˌvd/) (Old Slavic, literally "war-leader" or "war-lord") is an Eastern European title that originally denoted the principal commander of a military force. It derives from the word vojevoda, which in early Slavic meant the bellidux, i.e. the military commander of an area, but it usually had a greater meaning. In Byzantine times it referred to mainly military commanders of Slavic populations, especially in the Balkans. The title voevodas (Greek: βοεβόδας) was first used in the work of the 10th-century Byzantine emperor Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos De Administrando Imperio to identify Hungarian military leaders. In medieval Serbia it meant a high-ranking official and - before the Ottoman conquest in the 15th century - the commander of a military area
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Baranów Sandomierski
Baranów Sandomierski [baˈranuf sandɔˈmʲɛrskʲi] is a small town in southern Poland, in the Subcarpathian Voivodship, Tarnobrzeg County on the Vistula River, with 1,440 inhabitants (02.06.2009). Baranów lies near the Vistula river, along regional road nr. 985, which goes from Tarnobrzeg to Mielec. It belongs to the historic province of Lesser Poland, and for centuries was part of the Sandomierz Voivodeship. Its name comes either from sheep husbandry, which was prevalent in this area in the past (baran means ram in Polish), or from the Baranowski family, owners of the town. The settlement or the gord of Baranów was first mentioned in 1135. It was conveniently located near the Vistula river ford, and in 1354 it was granted town charter by King Casimir III the Great. Baranów belonged to the Baranowski family, and in the late 15th century it became property of the Kurozwecki family
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Polish Reformed Church
The Polish Reformed Church, officially called the Evangelical Reformed Church in the republic of Poland (Polish: Kościół Ewangelicko-Reformowany w RP) is a historic Protestant church in Poland established in the 16th century, still in existence today.

Stanislaus I Leszczynski Of Poland
Stanisław I Leszczyński (Polish pronunciation: [staˈɲiswaf lɛʂˈtʂɨɲskʲi]; also Anglicized and Latinized as Stanislaus I, Lithuanian: Stanislovas Leščinskis, French: Stanislas Leszczynski; 20 October 1677 – 23 February 1766) was King of Poland, Grand Duke of Lithuania, Duke of Lorraine and a count of the Holy Roman Empire. Stanisław was born into a powerful magnate family of Greater Poland, and he had the opportunity to travel to western Europe in his youth. In 1702 King Charles XII of Sweden marched into the country as part of a continuing series of conflicts between the powers of northern Europe. Charles forced the Polish nobility to depose Poland’s king, Augustus II the Strong, and then placed Stanisław on the throne (1704). The early 18th century was a period of great problems and turmoil for Poland
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Lorraine (duchy)
The Duchy of Lorraine (French: Lorraine, IPA: [lɔʁɛn]; German: Lothringen), originally Upper Lorraine, was a duchy now included in the larger present-day region of Lorraine in northeastern France. Its capital was Nancy. It was founded in 959 following the division of Lotharingia into two separate duchies: Upper and Lower Lorraine, the westernmost parts of the Holy Roman Empire. The Lower duchy was quickly dismantled, while Upper Lorraine came to be known as simply the Duchy of Lorraine. The Duchy of Lorraine was coveted and briefly occupied by the Dukes of Burgundy and the Kings of France. In 1737, the Duchy was given to Stanisław Leszczyński, the former king of Poland, who had lost his throne as a result of the War of the Polish Succession, with the understanding that it would fall to the French crown on his death
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Podkomorzy
This article discusses the organizational and administrative structure of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth was a confederative aristocratic republic of the period 1569–1795, comprising the Kingdom of Poland, the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and their fiefs. The Commonwealth was governed by the Parliament (Sejm) consisting of the King, the King-appointed Senate (Voivodes, Castellans, Ministers, Bishops) and the rest of hereditary nobility either in person or through the Lower Sejm (consisting of deputies representing their lands). The nobility's constitutional domination of the state made the King very weak and the commoners (burgesses and peasants) almost entirely unrepresented in the Commonwealth's political system. The Commonwealth's administrative system was a pre-bureaucracy
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Kalisz
Kalisz ([ˈkalʲiʂ] (About this sound listen); Old Greek: Καλισία, Latin: Calisia, Yiddish: קאַליש, German: Kalisch) is a city in central Poland with 103,738 inhabitants (June 2014), the capital city of the Kalisz Region. Situated on the Prosna river in the southeastern part of the Greater Poland Voivodeship, the city forms a conurbation with the nearby towns of Ostrów Wielkopolski and Nowe Skalmierzyce. See Kalisz County for the regional administrative area (powiat). Kalisz is an important regional industrial and commercial centre, with many notable factories. The city is also a centre for traditional folk art
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Wielkopolska
Greater Poland, often known by its Polish name Wielkopolska ([vʲɛlkɔˈpɔlska] (About this sound listen)) (German: Großpolen; Latin: Polonia Maior), is a historical region of west-central Poland. Its chief city is Poznań. The boundaries of Greater Poland have varied somewhat throughout history. Since the Middle Ages, the proper (właściwa) or exact/strict (ścisła) Wielkopolska (often referred to as ziemia, meaning "land") included the Poznań and Kalisz voivodeships. In the wider sense (as dzielnica, i.e. region), it encompassed also Sieradz, Łęczyca, Brześć Kujawski and Inowrocław voivodeships (more eastward). One another meaning (as province) included also Mazovia and Royal Prussia. After the Partitions of Poland, Greater Poland was often identified with the Grand Duchy of Posen
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Brześć Kujawski Voivodeship
Coat of arms of Brześć Kujawski Coat of arms
Location of Brześć Kujawski
Brześć Kujawski Voivodeship in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, 1635
Capital Brześć Kujawski
History
 •  Established 14th century
 •  Second Partition of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth 1793
Area 3,000 km2---> (1,158 sq mi)
Political subdivisions counties: 5
¹ Voivodeship of the Polish Crown in the
Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth; Voivodeship of the Kingdom of Poland before 1569.
Brześć Kujawski Voivodeship (Latin: Palatinatus Brestensis, Polish: Województwo brzesko-kujawskie) was a unit of administrative division and local government in the Kingdom of Poland (later Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth), from the 14th century to the Second Partition of Poland in 1793. It was part of the historic Kujawy region and the Greater Polish prowincja
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Holy Roman Empire
The Holy Roman Empire (Latin: Sacrum Imperium Romanum; German: Heiliges Römisches Reich), also known as Holy Roman Empire of the German nation, was a multi-ethnic complex of territories in Western and Central Europe that developed during the Early Middle Ages and continued until its dissolution in 1806 during the Napoleonic
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Castellan
A castellan was the governor or captain of a castellany and its castle. The word stems from the Latin Castellanus, derived from castellum "castle". Sometimes also known as a constable, governor of the castle district or captain, the Constable of the Tower of London is, in fact, a form of castellan
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