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Heraldry
Heraldry
Heraldry
(/ˈhɛrəldri/) is a broad term, encompassing the design, display, and study of armorial bearings (known as armory), as well as related disciplines, such as vexillology, together with the study of ceremony, rank, and pedigree.[1][2][3] Armory is the most familiar branch of heraldry, concerning the design and transmission of the heraldic achievement, more commonly known as the coat of arms
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Pharamond
Pharamond[1] or Faramund (c. 365 – 430) is a legendary early king of the Franks, first referred to in the anonymous 8th-century Carolingian text Liber Historiae Francorum, also known as the Gesta regnum Francorum. In this work, which is customarily dated to 727, the anonymous author begins by writing of a mythical Trojan origin for the Franks. The emphasis of the Liber was upon "construct[ing] a specific past for a particular group of people."[2]Contents1 Legend 2 Historical sources 3 Pharamond
Pharamond
in later culture 4 Notes 5 ReferencesLegend[edit] The story is told of the election of the first Frankish king.[3] It says that after the death of Sunno, his brother Marcomer, leader of the Ampsivarii
Ampsivarii
and Chatti, proposed to the Franks
Franks
that they should have one single king, contrary to their tradition
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Edward The Confessor
Edward the Confessor[a] (Old English: Ēadƿeard Andettere [æːɑdwæɑrˠd ɑndetere], Latin: Eduardus Confessor Classical Latin: [ɛ.dʊˈar.dʊs kɔ̃ˈfɛs.sɔr]; c. 1003 – 5 January 1066), also known as Saint
Saint
Edward the Confessor, was among the last Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
kings of England. Usually considered the last king of the House of Wessex, he ruled from 1042 to 1066. The son of Æthelred the Unready
Æthelred the Unready
and Emma of Normandy, Edward succeeded Cnut the Great's son – and his own half brother – Harthacnut, restoring the rule of the House of Wessex after the period of Danish rule since Cnut (better known as Canute) conquered England in 1016
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Israelites
The Israelites
Israelites
(/ˈɪzriəˌlaɪtsˌ/; Hebrew: בני ישראל‎ Bnei Yisra'el)[1] were a confederation of Iron Age
Iron Age
Semitic-speaking tribes of the ancient Near East, who inhabited a part of Canaan
Canaan
during the tribal and monarchic periods.[2][3][4][5][6] According to the religious narrative of the Hebrew Bible, the Israelites' origin is traced back to the Biblical patriarchs and matriarchs Abraham
Abraham
and his wife Sarah, through their son Isaac
Isaac
and his wife Rebecca, and their son Jacob
Jacob
who was later called Israel, from whence they derive their name, with his wives Leah
Leah
and Rachel. Modern archaeology has largely discarded the historicity of the religious narrative,[7] with it being reframed as constituting an inspiring national myth narrative
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Book Of Numbers
The Book
Book
of Numbers (from Greek Ἀριθμοί, Arithmoi; Hebrew: בְּמִדְבַּר‬, Bəmiḏbar, "In the desert [of]") is the fourth book of the Hebrew Bible, and the fourth of five books of the Jewish Torah.[1] The book has a long and complex history, but its final form is probably due to a Priestly redaction (i.e., editing) of a Yahwistic source made some time in the early Persian period (5th century BCE).[2] The name of the book comes from the two censuses taken of the Israelites. Numbers begins at Mount Sinai, where the Israelites
Israelites
have received their laws and covenant from God and God has taken up residence among them in the sanctuary.[3] The task before them is to take possession of the Promised Land. The people are counted and preparations are made for resuming their march
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Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Bible
Bible
(from Koine Greek
Koine Greek
τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books")[1] is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews
Jews
and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans. Many different authors contributed to the Bible
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Alexios I Komnenos
Alexios I Komnenos
Komnenos
(Greek: Ἀλέξιος Αʹ Κομνηνός, c. 1048 – 15 August 1118) was Byzantine emperor from 1081 to 1118. Although he was not the founder of the Komnenian dynasty, it was during his reign that the Komnenos
Komnenos
family came to full power. Inheriting a collapsing empire and faced with constant warfare during his reign against both the Seljuq Turks
Seljuq Turks
in Asia Minor
Asia Minor
and the Normans in the western Balkans, Alexios was able to curb the Byzantine decline and begin the military, financial, and territorial recovery known as the Komnenian restoration. The basis for this recovery were various reforms initiated by Alexios
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Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
is a historical region in West Asia
West Asia
situated within the Tigris– Euphrates
Euphrates
river system, in modern days roughly corresponding to most of Iraq, Kuwait, parts of Northern Saudi Arabia, the eastern parts of Syria, Southeastern Turkey, and regions along the Turkish–Syrian and Iran– Iraq
Iraq
borders.[1] The Sumerians and Akkadians
Akkadians
(including Assyrians and Babylonians) dominated Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
from the beginning of written history (c. 3100 BC) to the fall of Babylon
Babylon
in 539 BC, when it was conquered by the Achaemenid Empire
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Horus
Horus
Horus
is one of the most significant ancient Egyptian deities. He was worshipped from at least the late prehistoric Egypt until the Ptolemaic Kingdom
Ptolemaic Kingdom
and Roman Egypt
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Harold Godwinson
Harold Godwinson
Harold Godwinson
(c. 1022 – 14 October 1066), often called Harold II, was the last Anglo-Saxon king of England. Harold reigned from 6 January 1066[1] until his death at the Battle of Hastings
Battle of Hastings
on 14 October, fighting the Norman invaders led by William the Conqueror during the Norman conquest of England. His death marked the end of Anglo-Saxon rule over England. Harold was a powerful earl and member of a prominent Anglo-Saxon family with ties to Cnut the Great. Upon the death of his brother-in-law King Edward the Confessor
Edward the Confessor
on 5 January 1066, the Witenagemot
Witenagemot
convened and chose Harold to succeed; he was crowned in Westminster Abbey
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Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
Egypt
was a civilization of ancient Northeastern Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile
Nile
River in the place that is now the country Egypt
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High Middle Ages
Central Europe Guelf, Hohenstaufen, and Ascanian
Ascanian
domains in Germany about 1176         Duchy of Saxony          Margravate of Brandenburg          Duchy of Franconia         Duchy of Swabia          Duchy of BavariaThe High Middle Ages
Middle Ages
or High Medieval Period was the period of European history lasting from AD 1000 to 1250
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Ancient History
Ancient history
Ancient history
is the aggregate of past events[1] from the beginning of recorded human history and extending as far as the Early Middle Ages or the Post-classical Era. The span of recorded history is roughly 5,000 years, beginning with Sumerian Cuneiform
Cuneiform
script, the oldest discovered form of coherent writing from the protoliterate period around the 30th century BC.[2] The term classical antiquity is often used to refer to history in the Old World
Old World
from the beginning of recorded Greek history
Greek history
in 776 BC (First Olympiad). This roughly coincides with the traditional date of the founding of Rome in 753 BC, the beginning of the history of ancient Rome, and the beginning of the Archaic period in Ancient Greece
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Basilica Of St Denis
The Basilica of Saint Denis
Denis
(French: Basilique royale de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is a large medieval abbey church in the city of Saint-Denis, now a northern suburb of Paris. The building is of unique importance historically and architecturally as its choir, completed in 1144, shows the first use of all of the elements of Gothic architecture. The site originated as a Gallo-Roman cemetery in late Roman times. The archeological remains still lie beneath the cathedral; the people buried there seem to have had a faith that was a mix of Christian and pre-Christian beliefs and practices.[1] Around 475 St. Genevieve purchased some land and built Saint-Denys de la Chapelle. In 636 on the orders of Dagobert I
Dagobert I
the relics of Saint Denis, a patron saint of France, were reinterred in the basilica
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Second Crusade
Islamic victoryDecisive Seljuk Turks victory in Anatolia Decisive Crusader victories in Iberia Failure to recreate the County of Edessa Peace treaty between the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
and Seljuq Turks Beginning of crusader advances into EgyptTerritorial changes Lisbon
Lisbon
captured by the Portuguese and
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Bernard De Montfaucon
Dom Bernard de Montfaucon, O.S.B.
O.S.B.
(French: [də mɔ̃fokɔ̃]; 13 January 1655 – 21 December 1741) was a French Benedictine monk
Benedictine monk
of the Congregation of Saint Maur. He was an astute scholar who founded the discipline of palaeography, as well as being an editor of works of the Fathers of the Church. He is regarded as one of the founders of modern archaeology.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Legacy 4 Works 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit]The Emblematic Hand of the Mysteries (in Antiquitas explanatione et schematibus illustrata)Example of Montfaucon's facsimile from Codex Colbertinus 700 (designated by ℓ 1 on the list Gregory-Aland), with text of Matthew 18:10Montfaucon was born on 13 January 1655 in the Castle of Soulatgé, a small village in the southern town of Corbières, then in the ancient Province of Languedoc, now in the modern Department of Aude
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