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Henry Yule
Sir Henry Yule
Henry Yule
KCSI (1 May 1820 – 30 December 1889) was a Scottish Orientalist. He published many travel books, including translations of the work of Marco Polo
Marco Polo
and Mirabilia by the 14th century Dominican Friar Jordanus. He was also the compiler of a dictionary of Anglo-Indian
Anglo-Indian
terms, the Hobson-Jobson, along with Arthur Coke Burnell.Contents1 Early life 2 India 3 Retirement in Europe 4 Awards 5 Selected publications 6 References 7 Sources 8 Further reading 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Henry Yule
Henry Yule
was born at Inveresk
Inveresk
near Edinburgh
Edinburgh
in Scotland
Scotland
on 1 May 1820. He was the youngest son of Major William Yule (1764–1839) and his wife Elizabeth Paterson (died circa 1827)
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Cousin Marriage
Cousin marriage
Cousin marriage
is marriage between cousins (i.e. people with common grandparents or people who share other fairly recent ancestors). Opinions and practice vary widely across the world. In some cultures and communities, cousin marriage is considered ideal and actively encouraged; in others, it is subject to social stigma. Cousin marriage is common in the Middle East, for instance, where it accounts for over half of all marriages in some countries.[1] In some countries outside that region, it is uncommon but still legal
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Royal School Of Military Engineering
The Royal School of Military Engineering
Royal School of Military Engineering
(RSME) Group provides a wide range of training not only in all the engineering disciplines that are fundamental to the Royal Engineers, but also Military Working Animals; their handlers and maintainers, Explosive Ordnance Disposal
Explosive Ordnance Disposal
and Military Musicians
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Harvey Goodwin
Harvey Goodwin
Harvey Goodwin
(9 October 1818 – 25 November 1891) was a Cambridge academic and Anglican bishop, Bishop of Carlisle from 1869 until his death.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Family 4 ReferencesLife[edit] Born at King's Lynn, he was a son of Charles Goodwin, a solicitor there; his mother was Frances Sawyer. One of his brothers was Charles Wycliffe Goodwin the Egyptologist and judge. From 1825 to 1833 he was educated at a private school at High Wycombe. Before going into residence at Cambridge, he joined a party at Keswick, Cumbria
Keswick, Cumbria
and read with William Hepworth Thompson, then a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. He was admitted pensioner of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge
Cambridge
on 16 November 1835, and soon gave evidence of ability in mathematics. From Lady-day 1837 to Michaelmas 1839 he was scholar of his college
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Society Of Saint Margaret
The Society of Saint Margaret
Society of Saint Margaret
(SSM) is an order of women in the Anglican Church. The Order is currently withdrawing from Scotland, but remains active in England, Haiti, Sri Lanka, and the United States.Contents1 History1.1 St Margaret's, East Grinstead 1.2 19th Century opposition2 Autonomous Houses2.1 SSM (Duxbury, USA) 2.2 SSM (Hackney, England) 2.3 SSM (Chiswick, England) 2.4 SSM (Colombo, Sri Lanka) 2.5 SSM (Walsingham, England) 2.6 SSM (Aberdeen, Scotland)3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The Sisters of St Margaret were founded in 1855 by Dr John Mason Neale at Rotherfield, England
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Church Of England
The Church of England
England
(C of E) is the state church of England.[3][4][5] The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
(currently Justin Welby) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England
England
is also the mother church of the international Anglican
Anglican
Communion
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Bishop Of Carlisle
The Bishop of Carlisle is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Carlisle in the Province of York. The diocese covers the County of Cumbria
Cumbria
except for Alston Moor
Alston Moor
and the former Sedbergh Rural District. The see is in the City of Carlisle where the seat is located at the Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity which was a collegiate church until elevated to cathedral status in 1133. The diocese was created in 1133 by Henry I out of part of the Diocese of Durham. It was extended in 1856 taking over part of the Diocese of Chester
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Plumian Professor Of Astronomy And Experimental Philosophy
Philosophy
Philosophy
(from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom"[1][2][3][4]) is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.[5][6] The term was probably coined by Pythagoras
Pythagoras
(c. 570–495 BCE)
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Cambridge Observatory
Cambridge
Cambridge
Observatory is an astronomical observatory at the University of Cambridge
Cambridge
in the East of England. It was established in 1823[1] and is now part of the site of the Institute of Astronomy. The old Observatory building houses the Institute of Astronomy Library which has a collection of modern and historical astronomical books.[2] There are a set of optical telescopes at the site on the Madingley Road in the west of Cambridge. By modern standards these are small, as well as being affected by light pollution
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University College London
£1.304 billion (university); £1.327 billion (consolidated) (2016-17)[2]Chancellor The Princess Royal (as Chancellor of the University of London)Provost Michael ArthurChair of the Council Dame DeAnne Julius[3]Academic staff7,070 (2014/15)[4]Administrative staff4,910 (2014/15)[4]Students 37,905 (2016/17)[5]Undergraduates 18,610 (2016/17)[5]Postgraduates 19,225 (2016/17)[5]Location London, United KingdomVisitor Terence Etherton (as Master of the Rolls ex officio)[6]Colours                     AffiliationsListAlan Turing Institute ACU ENTER European University Association
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Addiscombe
Addiscombe
Addiscombe
/ˈædɪskəm/ is an area of South London, England, within the London
London
Borough of Croydon. It is located 9.1 miles (15 km) south of Charing Cross
Charing Cross
and lies within the Historic County of Surrey. Addiscombe
Addiscombe
is a ward, and had a population of 16,883 in 2011.Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Addiscombe
Addiscombe
Military Seminary 2.2 Growth3 Present day 4 Notable people 5 Geography 6 Sport 7 Transport 8 See also 9 ReferencesEtymology[edit] Addiscombe
Addiscombe
as a place name is Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
in origin, and means "Eadda or Æddi's estate" from an Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
personal name and the word camp, meaning an enclosed area in Old English
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Croydon
Croydon
Croydon
is a large town in the south of Greater London, England, 9.5 miles (15.3 km) south of Charing Cross. The principal settlement in the London Borough of Croydon, it is one of the largest commercial districts outside Central London, with an extensive shopping district and night-time economy.[2] Its population of 52,104 at the 2011 census includes the wards of Addiscombe, Broad Green, and Fairfield. Historically part of the hundred of Wallington in the county of Surrey, at the time of the Norman conquest of England
England
Croydon
Croydon
had a church, a mill, and around 365 inhabitants, as recorded in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086.[3] Croydon
Croydon
expanded in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
as a market town and a centre for charcoal production, leather tanning and brewing
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Commission (document)
A commission is a formal document issued to appoint a named person to high office or as a commissioned officer in a territory's armed forces. Commissions are typically issued in the name of or signed by the head of state. In Commonwealth realms other than the United Kingdom, they may be signed by the Governor-General, the representative of the Monarch of the United Kingdom, who is also Commander-in-Chief in and over that realm.Contents1 Terminology 2 Military and naval examples2.1 Canada 2.2 Sweden 2.3 United Kingdom2.3.1 Royal Navy pre-19642.4 United States3 Examples of Commissions to Civil Offices3.1 United States 3.2 US States4 See also 5 References 6 External linksTerminology[edit] Because the word "commission" can also refer generally to an individual's duty, the more specific terms commissioning parchment or commissioning scroll are often used to specify the commissioning document
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James Challis
James Challis FRS (12 December 1803 – 3 December 1882) was an English clergyman, physicist and astronomer. Plumian Professor of Astronomy
Astronomy
and Experimental Philosophy and the director of the Cambridge
Cambridge
Observatory, he investigated a wide range of physical phenomena though made few lasting contributions outside astronomy. He is best remembered for his missed opportunity to discover the planet Neptune
Neptune
in 1846.Contents1 Early life 2 Plumian professor 3 Cambridge
Cambridge
Observatory 4 The search for the eighth planet 5 Physicist 6 Theological views 7 Assessment 8 Honours and memorials 9 References 10 Bibliography10.1 By Challis 10.2 Obituary 10.3 About Challis11 External linksEarly life[edit] Challis was born in Braintree, Essex
Braintree, Essex
where his father, John Challis, was a stonemason
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Bengal Engineers
The Bengal Engineer Group
Bengal Engineer Group
(BEG) or the Bengal Sappers
Bengal Sappers
or Bengal Engineers as they are informally known, are remnants of British Indian Army's Bengal Army
Bengal Army
of the Bengal Presidency
Bengal Presidency
in British India; now a regiment of the Corps of Engineers in the Indian Army. The Bengal Sappers have their regimental centre at Roorkee
Roorkee
Cantonment in Roorkee city, Uttarakhand. The Bengal Sappers
Bengal Sappers
are one of the few remaining regiments of the erstwhile Bengal Presidency
Bengal Presidency
Army and survived the Rebellion of 1857 due to their sterling work in the recapture of Delhi and other operations in 1857–58
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Indian Civil Service (British India)
The Indian Civil Service (ICS) for part of the 19th century officially known as the Imperial Civil Service, was the elite higher civil service of the British Empire
British Empire
in British India
British India
during British rule in the period between 1858 and 1947. Its members ruled more than 300 million people[1] in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh
Bangladesh
and Burma
Burma
(then comprising British Raj). They were ultimately responsible for overseeing all government activity in the 250 districts that comprised British India
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