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Henry Warburton
HENRY WARBURTON (12 November 1784 – 16 September 1858) was an English merchant and politician, and also an enthusiastic amateur scientist. Elected as Member of Parliament for Bridport , Dorset, in the 1826 general election , he held the seat for 15 years until his resignation from the House of Commons in 1841. He was returned to the Commons at a by-election in November 1843, for Kendal , but did not seek re-election in 1847 . On Parliament he was active in the reform of bankruptcy, the repeal of stamp duty on newspapers, introduction of the penny post and in the campaigns of the Anti-Corn Law League . CONTENTS * 1 Early life * 2 In politics * 3 References * 4 External links EARLY LIFEThe son of John Warburton of Eltham
Eltham
, Kent, a timber merchant, he was educated at Eton College , and at Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College, Cambridge
, where he was admitted 24 June 1802, aged 18
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George Hayter
SIR GEORGE HAYTER (17 December 1792 – 18 January 1871) was a notable English painter , specialising in portraits and large works involving in some cases several hundred individual portraits. Queen Victoria appreciated his merits and appointed Hayter her Principal Painter in Ordinary and also awarded him a Knighthood 1841
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Merchant
A MERCHANT is a person who trades in commodities produced by other people to earn a profit . A merchant historically was anyone who was involved in business as long as industry, commerce, and trade have existed. The status of the merchant has varied during different periods of history and among different societies. In modern times, the term occasionally has been used to refer to a businessperson or someone undertaking activities (commercial or industrial) for the purpose of generating profit, cash flow, sales, and revenue utilizing a combination of human, financial, intellectual and physical capital with a view to fueling economic development and growth. A scale or balance is often used to symbolise a merchant Merchants have been known for as long as humans have engaged in trade and commerce. Merchants and merchant networks were known to operate in ancient Babylonia and Assyria, China, Egypt, Greece, India, Persia, Phoenecia and Rome
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Bridport (UK Parliament Constituency)
BRIDPORT was a parliamentary borough in Dorset
Dorset
, England, which elected two Members of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons from 1295 until 1868, and then one member from 1868 until 1885, when the borough was abolished. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Members of Parliament * 2.1 MPs 1295–1640 * 2.2 MPs 1640–1868 * 2.3 MPs 1868–1885 * 3 Notes * 4 Election results * 5 References HISTORY Bridport was continuously represented in Parliament from the first. The medieval borough consisted of the parish of Bridport , a small port and market town, where the main economic interests were sailcloth and rope-making, as well as some fishing. (For some time in the 16th century, the town had a monopoly of making all cordage for the navy.) By 1831, the population of the borough was 4,242, and the town contained 678 houses
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United Kingdom General Election, 1826
Earl of Liverpool Tory SUBSEQUENT PRIME MINISTER Earl of Liverpool Tory The 1826 UNITED KINGDOM GENERAL ELECTION saw the Tories under the Earl of Liverpool win a substantial and increased majority over the Whigs . In Ireland
Ireland
, Home Rule
Home Rule
candidates, working with the Whigs, won large gains from Unionist candidates. The seventh United Kingdom
United Kingdom
Parliament was dissolved on 2 June 1826. The new Parliament was summoned to meet on 25 July 1826, for a maximum seven-year term from that date. The maximum term could be and normally was curtailed, by the monarch dissolving the Parliament, before its term expired
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Resignation From The British House Of Commons
Members of Parliament (MPs) sitting in the House of Commons in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
are technically not permitted to resign their seats. To circumvent this prohibition, a legal fiction is used. Formerly, appointment to an "office of profit under the Crown " disqualified an individual from sitting as an MP. Hence an MP who wished to give up his or her seat would ask to be appointed to such an office – one which no longer has any duties associated with it – thus causing disqualification and vacation of the seat. Offices of profit are no longer disqualifying, but appointment to various specified offices is, and two offices are specified as disqualifying for this purpose: the Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Chiltern Hundreds and of the Manor of Northstead
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Kendal (UK Parliament Constituency)
KENDAL was a parliamentary borough centred on the town of Kendal
Kendal
in Westmorland . It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom , elected by the first past the post system. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Boundaries * 3 Members of Parliament * 4 Elections * 4.1 Elections in the 1880s * 4.2 Elections in the 1890s * 4.3 Elections in the 1900s * 4.4 Elections in the 1910s * 5 References HISTORYThe constituency was created by the Reform Act 1832 for the 1832 general election , and abolished for the 1918 general election . The small Kendal
Kendal
parliamentary borough constituency created in 1832 was abolished in 1885 by the Reform Act 1884 . James Cropper , Liberal , being its last MP
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United Kingdom General Election, 1847
Lord John Russell Whig SUBSEQUENT PRIME MINISTERLord John Russell Whig * 1837 election * MPs * 1841 election * MPs * 1847 election * MPs * 1852 election * MPs * 1857 election * MPs The 1847 UNITED KINGDOM GENERAL ELECTION saw candidates calling themselves Conservatives win the most seats, in part because they won a number of uncontested seats. However, the split among the Conservatives between the majority of Protectionists, led by Lord Stanley , and the minority of free traders, known also as the Peelites , led by former prime minister Sir Robert Peel
Sir Robert Peel
, left the Whigs, led by Prime Minister Lord John Russell , in a position to continue in government. The Irish Repeal group won more seats than in the previous general election, while the Chartists gained the only seat they were ever to hold, Nottingham 's second seat, held by Chartist leader Feargus O\'Connor
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Parliament Of The United Kingdom
HM GOVERNMENT * Conservative Party (254)CONFIDENCE AND SUPPLY * Democratic Unionist Party (4)HM MOST LOYAL OPPOSITION * Labour Party (201)OTHER OPPOSITION * Liberal Democrats (101) * Non-affiliated (31) * UKIP (3) * Ind. Labour (2) * Ulster Unionist Party (2) * Green Party (1) * Ind. Social Democrat (1) * Ind
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Stamp Duty
STAMP DUTY is a tax that is levied on documents. Historically, this included the majority of legal documents such as cheques , receipts, military commissions, marriage licences and land transactions. A physical stamp (a revenue stamp ) had to be attached to or impressed upon the document to denote that stamp duty had been paid before the document was legally effective. More modern versions of the tax no longer require an actual stamp. The duty is thought to have originated in Spain, being introduced (or re-invented) in the Netherlands in the 1620s, France in 1651, Denmark in 1657, Prussia in 1682 and England in 1694. CONTENTS * 1 Australia * 2 Denmark * 3 European Union * 4 Hong Kong * 5 Ireland * 6 Singapore * 7 Sweden * 8 United Kingdom * 9 United States * 10 See also * 11 References * 12 Further reading * 13 External links AUSTRALIA A Stamp Duty revenue stamp of Tasmania from 1892
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Penny Post
The PENNY POST is any one of several postal systems in which normal letters could be sent for one penny . Five such schemes existed in the United Kingdom while the United States initiated at least three such simple fixed rate postal arrangements
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Anti-Corn Law League
The ANTI-CORN LAW LEAGUE was a successful political movement in Great Britain aimed at the abolition of the unpopular Corn Laws , which protected landowners’ interests by levying taxes on imported wheat, thus raising the price of bread at a time when factory-owners were trying to cut wages. CONTENTS * 1 Corn Laws * 2 See also * 3 Notes * 4 Further reading * 4.1 Scholarly studies * 4.2 Historiography * 4.3 Contemporary publications * 5 External links CORN LAWSThe Corn Laws were taxes on imported grain designed to keep prices high for cereal producers in Great Britain. The laws indeed did raise food prices and became the focus of opposition from urban groups who had far less political power than rural Britain. The corn laws imposed steep import duties, making it too expensive for anyone to import grain from other countries, even when food supplies were short
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Eltham
ELTHAM (/ˈɛltəm/ ) is a district of south east London
London
, England, within the Royal Borough of Greenwich . It is located 8.7 miles (14.0 km) east-southeast of Charing Cross , and identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London
Greater London
. The three wards of Eltham
Eltham
North, South and West have a total population of 35,459
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Eton College
ETON COLLEGE /iːtən/ is an English independent boarding school for boys in Eton , Berkshire
Berkshire
, near Windsor . It educates more than 1,300 pupils, aged 13 to 18 years. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI as "The King's College of Our Lady of Eton besides Wyndsor", making it the 18th oldest Headmasters\' and Headmistresses\' Conference (HMC) school. Eton is one of the original seven public schools as defined by the Public Schools Act 1868
Public Schools Act 1868
. Following the public school tradition, Eton is a full boarding school, which means all pupils live at the school, and it is one of four such remaining single-sex boys' public schools in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(the others being Harrow , Radley , and Winchester ) to continue this practice. Eton has educated 19 British prime ministers and generations of the aristocracy and has been referred to as the chief nurse of England's statesmen
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