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Henry Rosewell
Sir Henry Rosewell (1590–1656) of Forde Abbey, Devon, was a puritan and supporter of the New World colonies.Contents1 Early years and education 2 Relations 3 Marriages 4 Activities 5 Death 6 Epilogue 7 References 8 ReferencesEarly years and education[edit] Henry Rosewell was born on 1 November 1590 at Forde Abbey
Forde Abbey
in Devon ( Forde Abbey
Forde Abbey
is in the parish of Thorncombe
Thorncombe
which was transferred from Devon to Dorset in 1842). Henry was the only son of William Rosewell (1561–1593) and Ann Walkeden who were married at St Martins, London on 20 June 1588. William Rosewell had purchased Forde Abbey
Forde Abbey
from Sir Amias Poulet about 1581. Henry was less than three years old when his father died and his mother, Ann, then married John Davis (later Sir John Davis of Bere Court, Berkshire)
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Isaac D'Israeli
Isaac D'Israeli
Isaac D'Israeli
(11 May 1766 – 19 January 1848) was a British writer, scholar and man of letters. He is best known for his essays, his associations with other men of letters, and as the father of British Prime Minister
Prime Minister
Benjamin Disraeli.Contents1 Life and career 2 Major works 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Isaac was born in Enfield, Middlesex, England, the only child of Benjamin D'Israeli (1730–1816), a Jewish merchant who had emigrated from Cento, Italy in 1748, and his second wife, Sarah Syprut de Gabay Villa Real (1742/3–1825). Isaac received much of his education in Leiden. At the age of 16, he began his literary career with some verses addressed to Samuel Johnson
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Exeter College, Oxford
Exeter
Exeter
College (in full: The Rector and Scholars of Exeter
Exeter
College in the University of Oxford) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
in England and the fourth oldest college of the University. The college is located on Turl Street, where it was founded in 1314 by Devon-born Walter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter, as a school to educate clergymen. At its foundation Exeter
Exeter
was popular with the sons of the Devonshire gentry, though has since become associated with a much broader range of notable alumni, including William Morris, J. R. R
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Bradford On Tone
Bradford on Tone is a village and civil parish in Somerset, England, situated on the River Tone 4 miles (6.4 km) south west of Taunton in the Taunton Deane district. The parish, which includes Tone Green, has a population of 622.[1] The village is centred on the meeting of three roads: two of these come from the A38, the main road between the towns of Taunton and Wellington, while the third leads north to the nearby village of Oake. Around this junction are situated the local pub, The White Horse, a war memorial, the Church of St Giles, the Village Hall and some older residential buildings.14th-century Bradford BridgeThe name Bradford is undoubtedly English: it shows the village to have stood in Saxon days near a broad ford, or passageway across the River Tone
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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg. The name Wikisource
Wikisource
was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later
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North Curry
North Curry
North Curry
is a village and civil parish in Somerset, England, situated 5 miles (8.0 km) east of Taunton
Taunton
in the Taunton
Taunton
Deane district. The parish, which includes Knapp and Lower Knapp has a population of 1,640.[1] North Curry
North Curry
sits on a ridge of land, 7 metres (23 ft) above sea level. North Curry
North Curry
is a fairly large village, but is quietly tucked away on the southwestern side of the Somerset
Somerset
Levels, well away from the main highways. The buildings, history, and village life make North Curry a surprising gem amongst the winding, hedgerow-bordered country lanes that tie it to surrounding villages
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William Rosewell (apothecary)
Major William Rosewell (c.1606 – c.1680) (also Rowswell or Rousewell), was a London apothecary, a Royalist soldier, apothecary to Queen Catherine (wife of Charles II), and Master of the Worshipful Company of Apothecaries (1661–62).Contents1 Family 2 Career2.1 Soldier 2.2 Apothecary 2.3 Apothecary to the Queen3 Death 4 Notes 5 ReferencesFamily[edit] William Rosewell is identified as 'Somerset born'[1] and of 'North Curry, Somerset'.[2] He commenced his apprenticeship in 1620 at about 14 years of age so was born about 1606.[3][nb 1] Sometime before 1638, William married Phillipa Phillips (died 1705) the youngest daughter of Francis Phillips of London (one of the Auditors of the Royal Exchequer) and sister of Francis Phillips (died 1674), of the Inner Temple and of Sunbury Manor, Sunbury, Middlesex (now Surrey)
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Holborn
Holborn
Holborn
(/ˈhoʊbərn/ HOH-bə(r)n or /ˈhɒlbərn/ [a]) is a district in the London boroughs of Camden and City of Westminster
City of Westminster
and a locality in the ward of Farringdon Without
Farringdon Without
in the City of London.Contents1 History1.1 Toponymy 1.2 Local governance 1.3 Urban development2 Modern times 3 Education 4 Geography4.1 Nearby areas 4.2 Transport5 Notable people 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Toponymy[edit] See also: Street names of Holborn The area's first mention is in a charter of Westminster
Westminster
Abbey, by King Edgar, dated to 959
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Henry Tazewell
Henry Tazewell (November 27, 1753 – January 24, 1799) was an American politician who was instrumental in the early government of the U.S. state of Virginia, and a United States Senator from Virginia.Contents1 Biography 2 Career 3 Death 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Brunswick County, Virginia, Tazewell was the son of Littleton and Mary Gray Tazewell. He attended the rural schools, then graduated from the College of William and Mary at Williamsburg, Virginia in 1770. He married Dorothea Elizabeth Waller on January 13, 1774. The couple were the parents of Littleton Waller Tazewell,[1] who became senator and governor of Virginia; and a daughter, Sophia Ann. Career[edit] Tazewell studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1773, and began his practice
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Brixham
Brixham
Brixham
/ˈbrɪksəm/ is a small fishing town and civil parish in the district of Torbay
Torbay
in the county of Devon, in the south-west of England. Brixham
Brixham
is at the southern end of Torbay, across the bay (Tor Bay) from Torquay, and fishing and tourism are the major industries. At the time of the 2011 census it had a population of 16,693.[1] It is thought that the name 'Brixham' came from Brioc's village. 'Brioc' was an old English or Brythonic personal name and '-ham' is an ancient term for home derived from Old English. The town is hilly and built around the harbour which remains in use as a dock for fishing trawlers. It has a focal tourist attraction in the replica of Sir Francis Drake's ship Golden Hind
Golden Hind
that is permanently moored there. Historically, Brixham
Brixham
was two separate communities with only a marshy lane to connect them
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Churston
Churston Ferrers
Churston Ferrers
is an historic civil parish,[1] former manor and ecclesiastical parish in Devon, England, situated between the south coast towns Paignton
Paignton
and Brixham. Today it is administered by local government as the Churston-with-Galmpton ward of the Torbay
Torbay
unitary authority. It contains the coastal village of Churston, the now larger village of Galmpton and the Broadsands
Broadsands
area. Churston residents tend to associate mostly with Brixham, though those in the northern part of the Churston-with-Galmpton ward often think of themselves as part of Paignton[2]. Churston railway station
Churston railway station
is on the Paignton
Paignton
and Dartmouth Steam Railway from which steam trains run daily
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Sir Edmund Prideaux, 1st Baronet Of Ford Abbey
Edmund Prideaux (died 1659) of Forde Abbey, Thornecombe, Devonshire,[2] was an English lawyer and Member of Parliament, who supported the Parliamentary cause during the Civil War. He was briefly solicitor-general but chose to resign rather than participate in the regicide of King Charles I and was afterwards attorney-general which position he held until he died
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Samuel Butler (poet)
Samuel Butler (baptized 14 February 1613 – 25 September 1680) was a poet and satirist. He is remembered now chiefly for a long satirical poem titled Hudibras.Contents1 Biography 2 Hudibras 3 Other writings 4 Quotations 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Samuel Butler was born in Strensham, Worcestershire, and was the son of a farmer and churchwarden, also named Samuel. His date of birth is unknown, but there is documentary evidence for the date of his baptism of 14 February.[1] The date of Butler's baptism is given as 8 February by Treadway Russell Nash in his 1793 edition of Hudibras. Nash had already mentioned Butler in his Collections for a History of Worcestershire
Worcestershire
(1781), and perhaps because the latter date seemed to be a revised account, it has been repeated by many writers and editors
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High Sheriff Of Devon
A sheriff is a government official, with varying duties, existing in some countries with historical ties to England, where the office originated. There is an analogous although independently developed office in Iceland
Iceland
that is commonly translated to English as sheriff, and this is discussed below.Contents1 Description 2 Term 3 Modern usage3.1 Australia 3.2 Canada3.2.1 Alberta 3.2.2 British Columbia 3.2.3 Nova Scotia3.3 Iceland 3.4 India 3.5 Republic of Ireland 3.6 Scotland3.6.1 Sheriffs principal 3.6.2 Sheriffs 3.6.3 Summary sheriffs3.7 South Africa 3.8 United States4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] Historically, a sheriff was a legal official with responsibility for a "shire" or county
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Massachusetts Bay Company
The Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay Colony (1628–1691) was an English settlement on the east coast of North America in the 17th century around the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay, the northernmost of the several colonies later reorganized as the Province of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay. The lands of the settlement were located in southern New England
New England
in what is now Massachusetts, with initial settlements situated on two natural harbors and surrounding land, about 15.4 miles (24.8 km) apart[1]—the areas around the present-day cities of Salem and Boston. The territory nominally administered by the colony included much of present-day central New England, including portions of the U.S. states of Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, and Connecticut. Territory claimed but never administered by the colonial government extended as far west as the Pacific Ocean
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John Conant
Rev. John Conant
John Conant
D.D.
D.D.
(18 October 1608 – 12 March 1694) was an English clergyman, theologian, and Vice- Chancellor
Chancellor
of Oxford University.[1]Contents1 Life 2 References 3 Sources 4 External linksLife[edit] Conant was born at Yettington, Bicton, in southeast Devon, England, the eldest son of Robert Conant, son of Richard Conant and his wife, Elizabeth Morris. He was educated first in the free school at Ilchester, Somerset, and then under the instruction of the schoolmaster Thomas Branker, with additional instruction by his uncle John, rector of Limington
Limington
in Somerset. Taken by his uncle to Oxford
Oxford
in 1627, he was enrolled on 18 February as a commoner of Exeter College, Oxford. There he was tutored by Lawrence Bodley, nephew of the benefactor of the Bodleian Library
Bodleian Library
at Oxford
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