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Henry Randolph
The Randolph family is a prominent Virginia
Virginia
political family, whose members contributed to the politics of Colonial Virginia
Virginia
and Virginia after it gained its statehood. They are descended from the Randolphs of Morton Morrell, Warwickshire, England. The first Randolph to come to America was Henry Randolph in 1643.[1] His nephew, William Randolph, later came to Virginia
Virginia
as an orphan in 1669. He made his home at Turkey Island along the James River
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Virginia
Virginia
Virginia
(/vərˈdʒɪniə/ ( listen); officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern[6] and Mid-Atlantic[7] regions of the United States
United States
located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains. Virginia
Virginia
is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" due to its status as the first English colonial possession established in mainland North America,[8] and "Mother of Presidents" because eight U.S. presidents were born there, more than any other state. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains
Blue Ridge Mountains
and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach
Virginia Beach
is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision
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List Of Governors Of Virginia
The following is a list of the Governors of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The Governor is the head of the executive branch of Virginia's state government and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces. The governor has the duty to enforce state laws, and the power to either approve or veto bills passed by the Virginia General Assembly, to convene the legislature, and to grant pardons, except in cases of impeachment.[1] The first Constitution of 1776 created the office of Governor, to be elected annually by the Virginia
Virginia
State Legislature
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Prince George County
Prince George County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 35,725.[1] Its county seat is Prince George.[2] Prince George County is located within the Greater Richmond Region
Greater Richmond Region
of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Virginia.Contents1 History 2 20th century to present 3 Geography3.1 Adjacent counties / independent cities 3.2 National protected areas4 Economy4.1 Top employers5 Government5.1 Law enforcement 5.2 Correctional institutions6 Towns, communities, region6.1 Census-designated places 6.2 Other unincorporated communities7 Transportation7.1 Major highways8 Demographics 9 Education9.1 High school 9.2 Jr
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Speaker (politics)
The speaker of a deliberative assembly, especially a legislative body, is its presiding officer, or the chair. The title was first used in 1377 in England.Contents1 Usage1.1 Australia 1.2 Italy 1.3 Canada 1.4 Singapore 1.5 United Kingdom 1.6 United States1.6.1 Federal 1.6.2 States2 Similar posts 3 List of current speakers 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingUsage[edit]Parliament of AlbaniaThe speaker's official role is to moderate debate, make rulings on procedure, announce the results of votes, and the like. The speaker decides who may speak and has the powers to discipline members who break the procedures of the chamber or house.[1] The speaker often also represents the body in person, as the voice of the body in ceremonial and some other situations
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House Of Burgesses
The Virginia
Virginia
House of Burgesses
House of Burgesses
/ˈbɜːrdʒəsɪz/ was the first legislative assembly of elected representatives in North America.[1] The House was established by the Virginia
Virginia
Company, which created the body as part of an effort to encourage English craftsmen to settle in North America, and to make conditions in the colony more agreeable for its current inhabitants.[2] From 1619 to 1776, the representative branch of the legislature of Virginia
Virginia
was the House of Burgesses, which governed in conjunction with a colonial governor and his council. Jamestown remained the capital of the Virginia
Virginia
colony until 1699, when the government was moved to Williamsburg
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Beverley Randolph
Beverley Randolph (1754 – February 7, 1797) was an American politician from Virginia. From 1788 to 1791, he served as the eighth Governor of Virginia.Contents1 Biography 2 Ancestry 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Randolph was one of four children born to Peter Randolph, son of William Randolph
William Randolph
II, and Lucille (Bolling) Randolph, at Turkey Island, a plantation in Henrico County in the Colony of Virginia.[1][2] One of Randolph's siblings was Ann Bolling Randolph Fitzhugh, wife of William Fitzhugh.[2] Randolph was educated at The College of William and Mary
The College of William and Mary
and married Martha Cocke in 1775. He served in the militia during the American Revolutionary War, was a member of the Virginia
Virginia
Assembly and was a member of the Virginia
Virginia
House of Delegates from 1777 to 1780
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Governor Of Virginia
The Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia
Virginia
serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia
Virginia
for a four-year term. The current holder of the office is Ralph Northam, who was sworn in on January 13, 2018.Contents1 Qualifications 2 Duties 3 Powers 4 History4.1 Colony 4.2 Commonwealth5 Style 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksQualifications[edit] Candidates for governor must be United States citizens who have resided in Virginia
Virginia
and been a registered voter for five years prior to the election in which they are running.[2] The candidates must be at least 30 years of age. Unlike other state governors, Virginia
Virginia
governors are not allowed to serve consecutive terms. They have been barred from immediate re-election since the adoption of Virginia's second constitution, in 1830
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US Constitution
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Edmund Randolph
Edmund Jennings Randolph (August 10, 1753 – September 12, 1813) was an American attorney and politician. He was the seventh Governor of Virginia, the second Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General.Contents1 Life and career1.1 Political career1.1.1 Constitutional Convention1.2 Role in ratification1.2.1 Virginia
Virginia
Convention 1.2.2 Washington's Cabinet1.3 Romance with Elizabeth Nicholas1.3.1 Resignation1.4 Later years2 Death and legacy 3 Sources 4 Further reading 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Randolph was born on August 10, 1753 to the influential Randolph family in Williamsburg in the Colony of Virginia. He was educated at the College of William and Mary. After graduation he began reading law with his father John Randolph and uncle, Peyton Randolph
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Aid-de-Camp
An aide-de-camp (UK: /ˌeɪddəˈkɒ̃/, US: /-ˈkæmp/;[1] French expression meaning literally helper in the [military] camp) is a personal assistant or secretary to a person of high rank, usually a senior military, police or government officer, a member of a royal family, or a head of state. This is not to be confused with an adjutant, who is the senior administrator of a military unit. The first aide-de-camp is typically the foremost personal aide. In some countries, the aide-de-camp is considered to be a title of honour (which confers the post-nominal letters ADC or A de C), and participates at ceremonial functions. The badge of office for an aide-de-camp is usually the aiguillette, a braided cord in gold or other colours, worn on the shoulder of a uniform
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George Washington
American Revolution Commander in Chief of the Continental ArmyValley Forge Battle of Trenton Mount Vernon
Mount Vernon
Conference 1787 Constitutional ConventionPresident of the United States PresidencyFirst term1788–89 election 1st inaugurationJudiciary Act Whiskey RebellionThanksgiving Presidential title Coinage Act Residence ActDistrict of ColumbiaSecond term1792 election 2nd inauguration Neutrality Act Jay TreatyJudicial appointments Farewell AddressLegacyLegacy Monuments Depictions Slavery Papers Library Bibliographyv t e George Washington
George Washington
(February 22, 1732[b][c] – December 14, 1799) was an American statesman and soldier who served as the first President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1789 to 1797 and was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States
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American Revolutionary War
Allied victory:Peace of Paris British recognition of American independence End of the First British Empire British retention of Canada
Canada
and GibraltarTerritorial changesGreat Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St
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United States Secretary Of State
The Secretary of State is a senior official of the federal government of the United States
United States
of America, and as head of the U.S. Department of State, is principally concerned with foreign policy and is considered to be the U.S. government's equivalent of a Minister for Foreign Affairs.[4][5] The Secretary of State is nominated by the President of the United States and, following a confirmation hearing before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, is confirmed by the United States Senate. The Secretary of State, along with the Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary of Defense, and Attorney General, are generally regarded as the four most important Cabinet members because of the importance of their respective departments.[6] Secretary of State is a Level I position in the Executive Schedule and thus earns the salary prescribed for that level (currently $205,700).[3] The current acting Secretary of State is John J. Sullivan
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Deputy Attorney General
The Deputy Attorney General (DAG) is the second-highest-ranking official in a department of justice or of law, in various governments of the world. In those governments, the Deputy Attorney General oversees the day-to-day operation of the department, and may act as Attorney General during the absence of the Attorney General. In Pakistan (DAG) is of grade 21. In the United States, the Deputy Attorney General is appointed by the President. In Pakistan, there is Additional Attorney General[1] then Deputy Attorney General and back bone of the attorney General's office is Assistant Attorney General, all are appointed by the President of Pakistan. References[edit]^ http://molaw.gov.pk/userfiles1/file/Law%20Officer%20October%202017.pdfThis law-related article is a stub
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United States Attorney General
The United States Attorney
United States Attorney
General (A.G.) is the head of the United States Department of Justice per 28 U.S.C. § 503, concerned with all legal affairs, and is the chief lawyer of the United States government. In cases of the federal death penalty, the power to seek the death penalty rests with the Attorney General. Under Article II Sec. 2 of the Constitution the Attorney General is nominated by the President and appointed with the advice and consent of Congress. The Constitution is clear that the Attorney General may be impeached by Congress. As to whether the Attorney General may be summarily removed by the President, no provision of the Constitution grants this power. The decisional law suggests that the President has the power to remove an official engaged in purely executive functions or an official whose duties immediately affect the President's ability to fulfill his constitutional responsibilities, Bowsher v
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