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Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston
Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount
Viscount
Palmerston, KG, GCB, PC, FRS (20 October 1784 – 18 October 1865), was a British statesman who served twice as Prime Minister in the mid-19th century. Palmerston dominated British foreign policy during the period 1830 to 1865, when Britain was at the height of her imperial power. He held office almost continuously from 1807 until his death in 1865. He began his parliamentary career as a Tory, defected to the Whigs in 1830, and became the first Prime Minister of the newly formed Liberal Party in 1859. Palmerston succeeded to his father's Irish peerage
Irish peerage
in 1802. He became a Tory MP in 1807, and, from 1809 to 1828, served as Secretary at War, as which he was responsible for the organisation of the finances of the army
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Anglo-Irish People
Anglo-Irish
Anglo-Irish
(Irish: Angla-Éireannach) is a term which was more commonly used in the 19th and early 20th centuries to identify a social class in Ireland, whose members are mostly the descendants and successors of the English Protestant Ascendancy.[1] They mostly belong to the Anglican Church of Ireland, which was the established church of Ireland
Ireland
until 1871, or to a lesser extent one of the English dissenting churches, such as the Methodist
Methodist
church, though some were also Catholic
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Henry Temple (other)
Henry Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Henry Temple
Henry Temple
may also refer to: Henry Temple, 1st Viscount Palmerston (c.1673–1757), Irish nobleman and British politician Henry Temple, 2nd Viscount Palmerston
Henry Temple, 2nd Viscount Palmerston
(1739–1802), grandson of the above, Irish nobleman and British politician Henry Wilson Temple
Henry Wilson Temple
(1864–1955), Republican politician from PennsylvaniaThis disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name
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Westminster
Westminster
Westminster
(/ˈwɛsmɪnstər, ˈwɛst-/) is an area of central London within the City of Westminster, part of the West End, on the north bank of the River Thames.[1] Westminster's concentration of visitor attractions and historic landmarks, one of the highest in London, includes the Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey
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Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
(/ˈhɑːrtfərdʃɪər/ ( listen)[n 1]; often abbreviated Herts) is a county in southern England, bordered by Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
to the north, Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the north-east, Essex
Essex
to the east, Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
to the west and Greater London
Greater London
to the south. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England
England
region. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700[2] living in an area of 634 square miles (1,640 km2).[3] Four towns have between 50,000 and 100,000 residents: Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford
Watford
and St Albans
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Tories (British Political Party)
The Tories were members of two political parties which existed sequentially in the Kingdom of England, the Kingdom of Great Britain and later the United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Ireland from the 17th to the early 19th centuries. The first Tories emerged in 1678 in England, when they opposed the Whig-supported Exclusion Bill
Exclusion Bill
which set out to disinherit the heir presumptive James, Duke of York, who eventually became James II of England
James II of England
and VII of Scotland. This party ceased to exist as an organised political entity in the early 1760s, although it was used as a term of self-description by some political writers
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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British People
 United Kingdom 57,678,000[2] (British citizens of any race or ethnicity) British Overseas Territories 247,899[3] United States 40,234,652-72,065,000 1 678,000 2[4][5] Canada 12,134,745 1 609,000 4[6] Australia 9,031,100 1[7] 1,300,000 4[8] Hong Kong 3,400,000 3 4[9] New Zealand 2,425,278 1 217,000 4[10] South Africa 1,600,000 750,000 4[8][11] Chile 700,000 1[12] France 400,000 4[13] Ireland 291,000 4[8] Argentina 250,000 1[14] United Arab Emirates 240,000 2[15] Spain 236,669 4[16][17] Peru 150,000 1[18] Germany 115,000 2[19] Pakistan 79,447 4[20] Cyprus 59,000 2[19] Thailand 51,000 2[21]  Switzerland 45,000 2[22] Netherlands 44,000 2[22] Israel 44,000[23] Portugal 41,000 2[22] Sweden 39,989 2 China 36,0
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Tory (British Political Party)
The Tories were members of two political parties which existed sequentially in the Kingdom of England, the Kingdom of Great Britain and later the United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Ireland from the 17th to the early 19th centuries. The first Tories emerged in 1678 in England, when they opposed the Whig-supported Exclusion Bill
Exclusion Bill
which set out to disinherit the heir presumptive James, Duke of York, who eventually became James II of England
James II of England
and VII of Scotland. This party ceased to exist as an organised political entity in the early 1760s, although it was used as a term of self-description by some political writers
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Irish Peerage
The Peerage of Ireland consists of those titles of nobility created by the English monarchs in their capacity as Lord or King of Ireland, or later by monarchs of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.[1] The creation of such titles came to an end in the 19th century. The ranks of the Irish peerage are Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount
Viscount
and Baron. As of 2016, there were 135 titles in the Peerage of Ireland extant: two dukedoms, ten marquessates, 43 earldoms, 28 viscountcies, and 52 baronies
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Interventionism (politics)
Interventionism is a policy of non-defensive (proactive) activity undertaken by a nation-state, or other geo-political jurisdiction of a lesser or greater nature, to manipulate an economy and/or society
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Ottoman Empire
The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Devlet-i ʿAlīye-i ʿOsmānīye[dn 5]), also historically known in Western Europe
Europe
as the Turkish Empire[8] or simply Turkey,[9] was a state that controlled much of southeastern Europe, western Asia and northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia
Anatolia
in the town of Söğüt (modern-day Bilecik Province) by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman.[10] After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman Beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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Peerage Of Ireland
The Peerage of Ireland consists of those titles of nobility created by the English monarchs in their capacity as Lord or King of Ireland, or later by monarchs of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.[1] The creation of such titles came to an end in the 19th century. The ranks of the Irish peerage are Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount
Viscount
and Baron. As of 2016, there were 135 titles in the Peerage of Ireland extant: two dukedoms, ten marquessates, 43 earldoms, 28 viscountcies, and 52 baronies
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Viscount
A viscount (/ˈvaɪkaʊnt/ ( listen) VY-kownt, for male[1]) or viscountess (/ˈvaɪkaʊntɪs/, for female[2]) is a title used in certain European countries for a noble of varying status, but historically deemed to convey a lower-middling rank.[3] In many countries a viscount, and its historical equivalents, was a non-hereditary, administrative or judicial position, and did not develop into a hereditary title until much later.[4] In the case of French viscounts, it is customary to leave the title untranslated as vicomte [vi.kɔ̃t] and vicomtesse.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Early modern and contemporary usage3.1 Belgium 3.2 United Kingdom3.2.1 Ireland 3.2.2 Use as a courtesy title 3.2.3 Coronet3.3 Jersey 3.4 Portugal 3.5 Spain4 Equivalent titles4.1 Germanic counterparts 4.2 Non-Western counterparts5 See also 6 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word viscount comes from
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Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
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