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Henry Cole
Sir Henry Cole
Henry Cole
(15 July 1808 – 18 April 1882) was a British civil servant and inventor who facilitated many innovations in commerce and education in 19th century in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Cole is credited with devising the concept of sending greetings cards at Christmas time, introducing the world's first commercial Christmas card
Christmas card
in 1843.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Felix Summerly pseudonym 3 Cole and the exhibitions 4 Museums 5 Honours and legacy 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit]The world's first commercially produced Christmas card, made by Henry Cole 1843. Henry Cole
Henry Cole
was born in Bath the son of Captain Henry Robert Cole, then of the 1st Dragoon Guards, and his wife Lætitia Dormer
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Marlborough House
Coordinates: 51°30′18″N 0°8′9″W / 51.50500°N 0.13583°W / 51.50500; -0.13583 Marlborough House
Marlborough House
- south sideMarlborough House, a Grade I listed[1] mansion in St James's
St James's
(City of Westminster, Inner London), is the headquarters of the Commonwealth of Nations and the seat of the Commonwealth Secretariat. It was built for Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, the favourite and confidante of Queen Anne. For over a century it served as the London residence of the Dukes of Marlborough.Contents1 Construction 2 Royal residence 3 Commonwealth Secretariat 4 Features 5 Public opening times 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksConstruction[edit]In its original form Marlborough House
Marlborough House
had just two storeys. This illustration of c.1750 shows the garden front.The Duchess wanted her new house to be "strong, plain and convenient and good"
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Reynard The Fox
Reynard
Reynard
(Dutch: Reinaert; French: Renard; German: Reineke or Reinicke; Latin: Renartus) is the main character in a literary cycle of allegorical Dutch, English, French and German fables. Those stories are largely concerned with Reynard, an anthropomorphic red fox and trickster figure. His adventures usually involve him deceiving other anthropomorphic animals for his own advantage or trying to avoid retaliations from them. His main enemy and victim across the cycle is his uncle, the wolf Isengrim (or Ysengrim)
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Fetter Lane
Fetter Lane
Fetter Lane
is a street in the ward of Farringdon Without
Farringdon Without
in the City of London. It forms part of the A4 road and runs between Fleet Street at its southern end and New Fetter Lane, which continues north towards Holborn
Holborn
Circus.Contents1 History 2 Properties 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The street was originally called Faytor or Faiter Lane, then Fewteres Lane. This is believed to come from the Old French
Old French
"faitor" meaning lawyer, though by the 14th century this had become synonymous with an idle person. Geoffrey Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer
used the word to refer to the beggars and vagrants who were seen around the lane
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Rowland Hill (postal Reformer)
Sir Rowland Hill, KCB, FRS (3 December 1795 – 27 August 1879) was an English teacher, inventor and social reformer. He campaigned for a comprehensive reform of the postal system, based on the concept of Uniform Penny Post
Uniform Penny Post
and his solution of prepayment, facilitating the safe, speedy and cheap transfer of letters. Hill later served as a government postal official, and he is usually credited with originating the basic concepts of the modern postal service, including the invention of the postage stamp.Contents1 Early life1.1 Educational reform 1.2 Colonisation of South Australia2 Postal reform 3 Later life 4 Legacy and commemorations4.1 Philatelic commemorations5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 Sources7 External linksEarly life[edit] Hill was born in Blackwell Street, Kidderminster, Worcestershire, England
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Penny Post
The Penny
Penny
Post is any one of several postal systems in which normal letters could be sent for one penny
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Woodburytype
A Woodburytype
Woodburytype
is both a printing process and the print that it produces. In technical terms, the process is a photomechanical rather than a photographic one, because sensitivity to light plays no role in the actual printing. The process produces very high quality continuous tone images in monochrome, with surfaces that show a slight relief effect. Essentially, a Woodburytype
Woodburytype
is a molded copy of an original photographic carbon print. The process was introduced by Walter B. Woodbury
Walter B. Woodbury
and was in use during the final third of the 19th century, most commonly for illustrating fine books with photographic portraits
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Mintons Ltd
Mintons
Mintons
was a major ceramics manufacturing company, originated with Thomas Minton
Thomas Minton
(1765–1836) the founder of " Thomas Minton
Thomas Minton
and Sons", who established his pottery factory in Stoke-upon-Trent, Staffordshire, England, in 1793, producing earthenware. He formed a partnership, Minton & Poulson, c.1796, with Joseph Poulson who made bone china from c.1798 in his new near-by china pottery. When Poulson died in 1808, Minton carried on alone, using Poulson's pottery for china until 1816. He built a new china pottery in 1824
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Children's Book
Children's literature
Children's literature
or juvenile literature includes stories, books, magazines, and poems that are enjoyed by children. Modern children's literature is classified in two different ways: genre or the intended age of the reader. Children's literature
Children's literature
can be traced to stories and songs, part of a wider oral tradition, that adults shared with children before publishing existed. The development of early children's literature, before printing was invented, is difficult to trace. Even after printing became widespread, many classic "children's" tales were originally created for adults and later adapted for a younger audience. Since the 15th century, a large quantity of literature, often with a moral or religious message, has been aimed specifically at children
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Royal College Of Music
The Royal College of Music
Royal College of Music
is a conservatoire established by royal charter in 1882, located in South Kensington, London, UK. It offers training from the undergraduate to the doctoral level in all aspects of Western Art including performance, composition, conducting, music theory and history. The RCM also undertakes research, with particular strengths in performance practice and performance science. The college is one of the four conservatories of the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music and a member of Conservatoires UK
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Vanity Fair (British Magazine 1868-1914)
The second Vanity Fair was a British weekly magazine published from 1868 to 1914.Contents1 History 2 Caricatures 3 Image gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Subtitled "A Weekly Show of Political, Social and Literary Wares", it was founded by Thomas Gibson Bowles, who aimed to expose the contemporary vanities of Victorian society. The first issue appeared in London on 7 November 1868. It offered its readership articles on fashion, current events, the theatre, books, social events and the latest scandals, together with serial fiction, word games and other trivia. Bowles wrote much of the magazine himself under various pseudonyms, such as "Jehu Junior", but contributors included Lewis Carroll, Arthur Hervey, Willie Wilde, P. G
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Hyde Park, London
Hyde Park is a Grade I-listed major park in Central London. It is the largest of four Royal Parks that form a chain from the entrance of Kensington Palace
Kensington Palace
through Kensington Gardens
Kensington Gardens
and Hyde Park, via Hyde Park Corner and Green Park
Green Park
past the main entrance to Buckingham Palace. The park is divided by the Serpentine and the Long Water. The park was established by Henry VIII in 1536 when he took the land from Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey
and used it as a hunting ground. It opened to the public in 1637 and quickly became popular, particularly for May Day parades. Major improvements occurred in the early 18th century under the direction of Queen Caroline
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Society For The Encouragement Of Arts, Manufactures, And Commerce
The Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) is a London-based, British organisation committed to finding practical solutions to social challenges.[1] Founded in 1754 by William Shipley as the Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufacture and Commerce, it was granted a Royal Charter in 1847,[2] and the right to use the term Royal in its name by King Edward VII in 1908.[3] The shorter version, The Royal Society of Arts and the related RSA acronym, are used more frequently than the full name. Charles Dickens, Adam Smith, Benjamin Franklin, Karl Marx, Richard Attenborough, William Hogarth, John Diefenbaker, Stephen Hawking, Benson Taylor and Tim Berners-Lee are some of the notable past and present Fellows, and today it has Fellows elected from 80 countries worldwide. The RSA award three medals, the Albert Medal, the Benjamin Franklin Medal (following a decision by the Board in 2013, the Benjamin Franklin Medal is now overseen by the RSA US, althoug
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Albert, Prince Consort
Prince Albert of Saxe- Coburg
Coburg
and Gotha (Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emmanuel;[1] 26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria. He was born in the Saxon duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, to a family connected to many of Europe's ruling monarchs. At the age of 20, he married his first cousin, Queen Victoria; they had nine children. Initially he felt constrained by his role of consort, which did not afford him power or responsibilities. He gradually developed a reputation for supporting public causes, such as educational reform and the abolition of slavery worldwide, and was entrusted with running the Queen's household, office and estates. He was heavily involved with the organisation of the Great Exhibition of 1851, which was a resounding success. Victoria came to depend more and more on his support and guidance
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Royal Society Of Arts
The Royal Society
Royal Society
for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) is a London-based, British organisation committed to finding practical solutions to social challenges.[1] Founded in 1754 by William Shipley
William Shiple

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Queen Victoria
Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom
Queen of the United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India. Victoria was the daughter of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, the fourth son of King George III. Both the Duke of Kent and King George III
King George III
died in 1820, and Victoria was raised under close supervision by her German-born mother, Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. She inherited the throne at the age of 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no surviving legitimate children. The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
was already an established constitutional monarchy, in which the sovereign held relatively little direct political power
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