HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Helicopter
A helicopter is a type of rotorcraft in which lift and thrust are supplied by rotors. This allows the helicopter to take off and land vertically, to hover, and to fly forward, backward, and laterally. These attributes allow helicopters to be used in congested or isolated areas where fixed-wing aircraft and many forms of VTOL
VTOL
(vertical takeoff and landing) aircraft cannot perform. The English word helicopter is adapted from the French word hélicoptère, coined by Gustave Ponton d'Amécourt in 1861, which originates from the Greek helix (ἕλιξ) "helix, spiral, whirl, convolution"[1] and pteron (πτερόν) "wing".[2][3][4][5] English language nicknames for helicopter include "chopper", "copter", "helo", "heli", and "whirlybird". Helicopters were developed and built during the first half-century of flight, with the Focke-Wulf Fw 61
Focke-Wulf Fw 61
being the first operational helicopter in 1936
[...More...]

"Helicopter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antoinette (manufacturer)
Antoinette was a French manufacturer of light petrol engines. Antoinette also became a pioneer-era builder of aeroplanes before World War I, most notably the record-breaking monoplanes flown by Hubert Latham
Hubert Latham
and René Labouchère. Based in Puteaux, the Antoinette concern was in operation between 1903 and 1912. The company operated a flying school at Chalons for which it built one of the earliest flight simulators.Contents1 Private engine-building venture 2 Antoinette incorporates 3 Aircraft manufacture3.1 Flying school at Châlons 3.2 Aircraft promotion with Latham 3.3 Aircraft built by Antoinette4 Turbulent times and the end of Antoinette 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Bibliography6 External linksPrivate engine-building venture[edit] Antoinette began as a private venture led by the engineer Léon Levavasseur and financed by Jules Gastambide, who owned an electricity generating station in Algeria
[...More...]

"Antoinette (manufacturer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alphonse Pénaud
Alphonse Pénaud
Alphonse Pénaud
(31 May 1850 – 22 October 1880), was a 19th-century French pioneer of aviation design and engineering. He was the originator of the use of twisted rubber to power model aircraft, and his 1871 model airplane, which he called the Planophore, was the first truly successful automatically stable flying model. He went on to design a full sized aircraft with many advanced features, but was unable to get any support for the project, and eventually committed suicide in 1880, aged 30.Top to bottom: 1870 helicopter 1871 'Planophore 1873 ornithopterContents1 Biography1.1 Planophore 1.2 Later work2 Influence 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Pénaud was born in Paris
Paris
into a naval family, his father being an admiral in the French Navy. Because of a hip disease he walked with the aid of crutches and so was unable to attend the Naval School
[...More...]

"Alphonse Pénaud" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mikhail Lomonosov
Mikhail Vasilyevich Lomonosov (/ˌlɒməˈnɔːsɔːf, -sɒf/;[1] Russian: Михаи́л (Михáйло) Васи́льевич Ломоно́сов, IPA: [mʲɪxɐˈil vɐˈsʲilʲjɪvʲɪtɕ ləmɐˈnosəf] ( listen); November 19 [O.S. November 8] 1711 – April 15 [O.S. April 4] 1765) was a Russian polymath, scientist and writer, who made important contributions to literature, education, and science. Among his discoveries were the atmosphere of Venus and the law of conservation of mass in chemical reactions. His spheres of science were natural science, chemistry, physics, mineralogy, history, art, philology, optical devices and others
[...More...]

"Mikhail Lomonosov" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Russian Academy Of Sciences
The Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS; Russian: Росси́йская акаде́мия нау́к (РАН) Rossíiskaya akadémiya naúk) consists of the national academy of Russia; a network of scientific research institutes from across the Russian Federation; and additional scientific and social units such as libraries, publishing units, and hospitals. Headquartered in Moscow, the Academy (RAS) is considered a civil, self-governed, non-commercial organization[2] chartered by the Government of Russia. It combines the members of RAS (see below) and scientists employed by institutions
[...More...]

"Russian Academy Of Sciences" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Meteorological
Atmospheric physics Atmospheric dynamics (category) Atmospheric chemistry
Atmospheric chemistry
(category)Meteorology Weather
Weather
(category) · (portal) Tropical cyclone
Tropical cyclone
(category)Climatology Climate
Climate
(category) Climate
Climate
change (category) Global warming
Global warming
(category) · (portal)v t e Meteorology
Meteorology
is a branch of the atmospheric sciences which includes atmospheric chemistry and atmospheric physics, with a major focus on weather forecasting. The study of meteorology dates back millennia, though significant progress in meteorology did not occur until the 18th century. The 19th century saw modest progress in the field after weather observation networks were formed across broad regions. Prior attempts at prediction of weather depended on historical data
[...More...]

"Meteorological" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mechanic
[1] Duties[edit] Most mechanics specialize in a particular field, such as auto mechanics, truck mechanic, bicycle mechanics, motorcycle mechanics, boiler mechanics, general mechanics, industrial maintenance mechanics (millwrights), air conditioning and refrigeration mechanics, bus mechanics, aircraft mechanics,[2] diesel mechanics, and tank mechanics in the armed services. Auto mechanics, for example, have many trades within. Some may specialize in the electrical aspects, while others may specialize in the mechanical aspects. Other areas include: brakes and steering, suspension, automatic or manual transmission, engine repairs, or diagnosing customer complaints. An automotive technician, on the other hand, has a wide variety of topics to learn. A mechanic is typically certified by a trade association or regional government power. Mechanics may be separated into two classes based on the type of machines they work on, heavyweight and lightweight
[...More...]

"Mechanic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Turkey (bird)
The turkey is a large bird in the genus Meleagris, which is native to the Americas. Males of both turkey species have a distinctive fleshy wattle or protuberance that hangs from the top of the beak (called a snood). They are among the largest birds in their ranges
[...More...]

"Turkey (bird)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

French Academy Of Sciences
The French Academy of Sciences
Academy of Sciences
(French: Académie des sciences) is a learned society, founded in 1666 by Louis XIV
Louis XIV
at the suggestion of Jean-Baptiste Colbert, to encourage and protect the spirit of French scientific research
[...More...]

"French Academy Of Sciences" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wright Brothers
Signatures      Orville WrightBorn (1871-08-19)August 19, 1871 Dayton, OhioDied January 30, 1948(1948-01-30) (aged 76) Dayton, OhioEducation 3 years high schoolOccupation Printer/publisher, bicycle retailer/manufacturer, airplane inventor/manufacturer, pilot trainerWilbur WrightBorn (1867-04-16)April 16, 1867 Millville, IndianaDied May 30, 1912(1912-05-30) (aged 45) Dayton, OhioEducation 4 years high schoolOccupation Editor, bicycle retailer/manufacturer, airplane inventor/manufacturer, pilot trainerThe Wright brothers, Orville (August 19, 1871 – January 30, 1948) and Wilbur (April 16, 1867 – May 30, 1912), were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited[1][2][3] with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane
[...More...]

"Wright Brothers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Daoist
Taoism
Taoism
(/ˈtaʊɪzəm/, also US: /ˈdaʊ-/), also known as Daoism, is a religious or philosophical tradition of Chinese origin which emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao
Tao
(Chinese: 道; pinyin: Dào; literally: "the Way", also romanized as Dao)
[...More...]

"Daoist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gustave Trouvé
Gustave Pierre Trouvé (2 January 1839 – 27 July 1902) was a French electrical engineer and inventor in the 19th century. Trouvé was born January 2, 1839 in La Haye- Descartes
Descartes
(Indre-et-Loire, France) and died July 27, 1902 in Paris
[...More...]

"Gustave Trouvé" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Max Skladanowsky
Max Skladanowsky
Max Skladanowsky
(April 30, 1863 – November 30, 1939) was a German inventor and early filmmaker. Along with his brother Emil, he invented the Bioscop, an early movie projector the Skladanowsky brothers used to display the first moving picture show to a paying audience on November 1, 1895, just before the December 28, 1895 public debut of the Lumière Brothers' Cinématographe
Cinématographe
in Paris.Contents1 Life 2 Legacy 3 Filmography 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit]1895 poster for Bioscop
Bioscop
screeningsBorn in Pankow
Pankow
near Berlin
Berlin
to a glazier, Max Skladanowsky
Max Skladanowsky
was apprenticed as a photographer and glass painter, which led to an interest in magic lanterns
[...More...]

"Max Skladanowsky" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thomas Edison
Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor.[1][2][3] He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park",[4] he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.[5] Edison was a prolific inventor, holding 1,093 US patents in his name, as well as many patents in the United Kingdom, France, and Germany. More significant than the number of Edison's patents was the widespread impact of his inventions: electric light and power utilities, sound recording, and motion pictures all established major new industries worldwide
[...More...]

"Thomas Edison" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

James Gordon Bennett, Jr.
James Gordon Bennett Jr.
James Gordon Bennett Jr.
(May 10, 1841 – May 14, 1918) was publisher of the New York Herald, founded by his father, James Gordon Bennett Sr. (1795–1872), who emigrated from Scotland. He was generally known as Gordon Bennett to distinguish him from his father.[1] Among his many sports-related accomplishments he organized both the first polo match and the first tennis match in the United States, and he personally won the first trans-oceanic yacht race
[...More...]

"James Gordon Bennett, Jr." on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Guncotton
Nitrocellulose
Nitrocellulose
(also known as cellulose nitrate, flash paper, flash cotton, guncotton, and flash string) is a highly flammable compound formed by nitrating cellulose through exposure to nitric acid or another powerful nitrating agent. When used as a propellant or low-order explosive, it was originally known as guncotton. Partially nitrated cellulose has found uses as a plastic film and in inks and wood coatings.[2] In 1862 the first man-made plastic, nitrocellulose (branded Parkesine), was created by Alexander Parkes from cellulose treated with nitric acid and a solvent. In 1868, American inventor John Wesley Hyatt developed a plastic material he named Celluloid, improving on Parkes' invention by plasticizing the nitrocellulose with camphor so that it could be processed into finished form and used as a photographic film
[...More...]

"Guncotton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.