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Helderberg Escarpment
The Helderberg Escarpment
Escarpment
is an escarpment in eastern New York, roughly 11 miles (18 km) west of the city of Albany.[1][2] The escarpment rises steeply from the Hudson Valley
Hudson Valley
below, with an elevation difference of approximately 700 feet (from 400 to 1,100 feet) over a horizontal distance of approximately 2,000 feet
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United States Fish And Wildlife Service
The United States Fish
Fish
and Wildlife
Wildlife
Service (USFWS or FWS) is an agency of the federal government within the U.S. Department of the Interior dedicated to the management of fish, wildlife, and natural habitats
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New York (state)
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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Cornell University Press
The Cornell University
Cornell University
Press, is a division of Cornell University housed in Sage House, the former residence of Henry William Sage
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Hudson Valley
The Hudson Valley
Hudson Valley
comprises the valley of the Hudson River
Hudson River
and its adjacent communities in the U.S. state
U.S

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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Niagara Escarpment
The Niagara Escarpment
Escarpment
is a long escarpment, or cuesta, in the United States and Canada
Canada
that runs predominantly east/west from New York, through Ontario, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Illinois. The escarpment is most famous as the cliff over which the Niagara River
Niagara River
plunges at Niagara Falls, for which it is named. The Escarpment
Escarpment
is a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Biosphere Reserve. It has the oldest forest ecosystem and trees in eastern North America.[1] The Escarpment
Escarpment
is composed of the Lockport geological formation of Silurian
Silurian
age, and is similar to the Onondaga geological formation, which runs parallel to it and just to the south, through western New York and southern Ontario
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Onondaga Escarpment
The Onondaga Limestone is a group of hard limestones and dolostones of Devonian age that form an important geographic feature in some areas in which it outcrops, in others; especially its Southern Ontario portion, the formation can be less prominent as a local surface feature.[citation needed] In upstate New York and southern Ontario the sedimentary rocks tend to slope slightly southward, and the Onondaga outcrops in a line that usually forms an escarpment (the steep face of a cuesta), because of its resistance to erosion. The outcrop can be traced from the Hudson River valley westward along the southern rim of the Mohawk River valley, passing just south of Syracuse, and along the northern heads of the major Finger Lakes to Buffalo, New York. From Fort Erie, Ontario it runs to Windsor just north of the Lake Erie shoreline, becoming less prominent as one travels westward
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Middle Ordovician
The Ordovician
Ordovician
( /ɔːrdəˈvɪʃən/) is a geologic period and system, the second of six periods of the Paleozoic
Paleozoic
Era
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Early Devonian
The Devonian
Devonian
is a geologic period and system of the Paleozoic, spanning 60 million years from the end of the Silurian, 419.2 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Carboniferous, 358.9 Mya.[9] It is named after Devon, England, where rocks from this period were first studied. The first significant adaptive radiation of life on dry land occurred during the Devonian. Free-sporing vascular plants began to spread across dry land, forming extensive forests which covered the continents. By the middle of the Devonian, several groups of plants had evolved leaves and true roots, and by the end of the period the first seed-bearing plants appeared. Various terrestrial arthropods also became well-established. Fish
Fish
reached substantial diversity during this time, leading the Devonian
Devonian
to often be dubbed the "Age of Fish"
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Schenectady Gazette
The Daily Gazette, formerly The Schenectady Gazette, is an independently owned daily newspaper based in Schenectady, New York[1] and mainly covers the counties of Schenectady, Albany, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Fulton, Schoharie, and Montgomery. The newspaper was formed in 1894 when the Schenectady Printing Association took over a weekly called the Schenectady Gazette and turned it into a daily, renaming it The Daily Gazette in 1895. Despite there being two other city newspapers — the Evening Star and the Union – the Gazette was successful under the leadership of Gerardus Smith, who became the first president of the renamed Daily Gazette Company in March 1899
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Arcadia Publishing
Arcadia Publishing
Publishing
is an American publisher of neighborhood, local, and regional history of the United States
United States
in pictorial form.[2][3][4] Arcadia Publishing
Publishing
also runs the History Press, which publishes text-driven books on American history and folklore.Contents1 History 2 The History Press 3 Distribution 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] It was founded in Dover, New Hampshire, in 1993 by United Kingdom-based Tempus Publishing, but became independent in 2004
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Solutional Cave
A solutional cave or karst cave is a cave usually formed in the soluble rock limestone. It is the most frequently occurring type of cave. It can also form in other rocks, including chalk, dolomite, marble, salt beds, and gypsum.Contents1 Process 2 Limestone
Limestone
caves2.1 Carbonic acid
Carbonic acid
dissolution 2.2 Hydrogen sulfide
Hydrogen sulfide
dissolution3 References 4 External linksProcess[edit] Bedrock
Bedrock
is dissolved by natural acid in groundwater that seeps through bedding-planes, faults, joints and so on. Over geological epochs these openings expand as the walls are dissolved to become caves or cave systems. The portions of a solutional cave that are below the water table or the local level of the groundwater will be flooded.[1] Limestone
Limestone
caves[edit] The largest and most abundant solutional caves are located in limestone
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Stalagmites
A stalagmite (UK: /ˈstæləɡmaɪt/ or US: /stəˈlæɡmaɪt/; from the Greek σταλαγμίτης - stalagmitês, from σταλαγμίας - stalagmias, "dropping, trickling")[1] is a type of rock formation that rises from the floor of a cave due to the accumulation of material deposited on the floor from ceiling drippings. Stalagmites may be composed of lava, minerals, mud, peat, pitch, sand, sinter and amberat (crystallized urine of pack rats).[2][3] The corresponding formation hanging down from the ceiling of a cave is a stalactite
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Open Space Institute
Open Space Institute (OSI) (not to confuse with the facilitator network of open conversation space) is a conservation organization and think tank that seeks to preserve scenic, natural and historic landscapes for public enjoyment, conserve habitats while sustaining community character, and help protect the environment. OSI uses policy initiatives and ground-level activism to help accomplish its goals.Contents1 Background 2 Activities 3 See also 4 External linksBackground[edit] Open Space Institute, established in 1964, achieves its goals through land acquisition, conservation easements, regional loan programs, creative partnerships, fiscal sponsorship, and analytical research. It seeks to do this by making land acquisition, establishing conservation easements and by making loans to, and creative partnerships with, other organizations
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