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Heavy Tank
A heavy tank was a class of tank that generally provided better armour protection as well as equal or greater firepower than tanks of lighter classes, often at the cost of mobility and manoeuvrability and, particularly, expense. The origins of the class date to World War I
World War I
and the very first tanks; designed to operate in close concert with the infantry and facing both artillery and the first dedicated anti-tank guns, early tanks had to have enough armour to allow them to survive in no man's land. As lighter tanks were introduced, the larger designs became known as heavies. A similar 'breakthrough' role remained into World War II. As tank-v-tank combat became more common, heavy tanks mounted very powerful anti-tank guns. By the end of the war they were used both for dealing with heavy fortifications as well as antitank work. They were also known as breakthrough tanks, indicating their purpose of spearheading the attack
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No Man's Land
No man's land
No man's land
is land that is unoccupied or is under dispute between parties who leave it unoccupied due to fear or uncertainty
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Tanks In The Israeli Army
Israeli
Israeli
may refer to:Israelis, citizens or permanent residents of the State of Israel Modern Hebrew, a language Israeli
Israeli
(newspaper), published from 2006 to 2008 Somethin
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Assault Gun
An assault gun is a form of self-propelled artillery[1] which utilizes an infantry support gun mounted on a motorized chassis, normally an armored fighting vehicle.[2] Assault guns are designed to provide direct fire support for infantry attacks, especially against other infantry or fortified positions.[3] The term is a literal translation of the German word Sturmgeschütz, which was applied to the first purpose-built assault gun, the StuG III, in 1940.[3] Historically, the concept of assault guns was very similar to that of the infantry tank, as both were combat vehicles intended to accompany infantry formations into battle.[4] However, during World War II assault guns were more mobile than tanks and could be utilized as both direct and indirect fire artillery.[4] Although they could approximate the firepower of a tank, assault guns mostly fired high explosive shells at relatively low velocities, which were well suited for their role of knocking out hard points such as fortified posit
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Multiple Rocket Launcher
A multiple rocket launcher (MRL) or multiple launch rocket system (MLRS) is a type of rocket artillery system. Rockets have different capabilities than artillery, like longer range, and different payloads, typically considerably larger warheads than a similarly sized artillery platform, or multiple warheads. Unguided rocket artillery is notoriously inaccurate and slow to reload, compared to artillery. To overcome this, rockets are combined in systems that can launch multiple rockets simultaneously. Modern rockets can use GPS or inertial guidance, to combine the advantages of rockets with high accuracy.Contents1 History1.1 World War II2 Types 3 Current usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The first multiple rocket launchers, huo che, were made during the medieval Chinese Song dynasty. It was designed to launch multiple rocket arrows from a gunpowder box
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World War I
Allied victory Central Powers
Central Powers
victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of all continental empires in Europe
Europe
(including Germany,
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Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
is the branch of an army that engages in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and tank forces. Also known as foot soldiers, infantry traditionally relies on moving by foot between combats as well, but may also use mounts, military vehicles, or other transport
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Artillery
Artillery
Artillery
is a class of large military weapons built to fire munitions far beyond the range and power of infantry's small arms. Early artillery development focused on the ability to breach fortifications, and led to heavy, fairly immobile siege engines. As technology improved, lighter, more mobile field artillery developed for battlefield use. This development continues today; modern self-propelled artillery vehicles are highly mobile weapons of great versatility providing the largest share of an army's total firepower. In its earliest sense, the word artillery referred to any group of soldiers primarily armed with some form of manufactured weapon or armour. Since the introduction of gunpowder and cannon, the word "artillery" has largely meant cannon, and in contemporary usage, it usually refers to shell-firing guns, howitzers, mortars, rockets and guided missiles
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Anti-tank Gun
Anti-tank guns are a form of artillery designed to destroy armored fighting vehicles, normally from static defensive positions.[1] The development of specialized anti-tank munitions and anti-tank guns was prompted by the appearance of tanks during World War I.[2] To destroy hostile tanks, artillerymen often used field guns depressed to fire directly at their targets
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Self-propelled Mortar
A mortar carrier, or self-propelled mortar, is a self-propelled artillery piece in which a mortar is its primary weapon. Simpler vehicles carry a standard infantry mortar while in more complex vehicles the mortar of is fully integrated into the vehicle and cannot be dismounted from the vehicle. Mortar carriers cannot be fired while on the move and some must be dismounted to fire.[citation needed].Contents1 Evolution 2 United States 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksEvolution[edit] The mortar carrier has its genesis in the general mechanisation and motorisation of infantry in the years leading up to World War II
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World War II
Pacific WarChina Pacific Ocean South-East Asia South West Pacific Japan Manchuria & North Korea Mediterranean and Middle EastNorth Africa East Africa Mediterranean Sea Adriatic Malta Yugoslavia Iraq Syria–Lebanon Iran Italy Dodecanese Southern France Other campaignsAtlantic Arctic Strategic bombing Americas French West Africa Indian Ocean Madagascar Contemporaneous warsSoviet–Japanese border conflicts Franco-Thai War Ecuadorian–Peruvian War Ili Rebellion World War II Alphabetical indices A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0–9Navigation CampaignsCountriesEquipment TimelineOutlineLists PortalCategoryBibliography vte World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis
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M4 Sherman
M4 and M4A1 model: Continental R975-C1 or -C4 9 cylinder radial gasoline engine, 350 or 400 hp (261 or 298 kW) at 2,400 rpm[3] M4A2 model: General Motors
General Motors
6046 twin inline diesel engine; 375 hp (280 kW) at 2,100 rpm[3] M4A3 model: Ford GAA V8 gasoline engine; 450 hp (336 kW) at 2,600 rpm[3] M4A4 model: Chrysler
Chrysler
A57 30 cylinder gasoline engine; 370 hp (276 kW) at 2,400 rpm[3] M4A6 model: Caterpillar D-200A (Wright RD-1820) 9 cylinder radial diesel engine; 450 hp (336 kW) at 2,400 rpm[3]Power/weight 10.46–13.49 hp/short ton (11.53–14.87 hp/metric ton) depending upon variant[3]Transmission Spicer manual synchromesh transmission, 5 forward and 1 reverse gears[4]Suspension Vertical volute spring suspension
Vertical volute spring suspension
(VVSS) or horizontal volute spring suspension (HVSS)Fuel capacity 138–175 U.S
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Self-propelled Anti-aircraft Weapon
An anti-aircraft vehicle, also known as a self-propelled anti-aircraft gun (SPAAG) or self-propelled air defense system (SPAD), is a mobile vehicle with a dedicated anti-aircraft capability. The Russian equivalent of SPAAG is ZSU, for zenitnaya samokhodnaya ustanovka, ("anti-aircraft self-propelled mount"). Specific weapon systems used include machine guns, autocannons, larger guns, or missiles, and some mount both guns and longer-ranged missiles (e.g. the Pantsir-S1). Platforms used include both trucks and heavier combat vehicles such as APCs and tanks, which add protection from aircraft, artillery, and small arms fire for front line deployment. Anti-aircraft guns are usually mounted in a quickly-traversing turret with a high rate of elevation, for tracking fast-moving aircraft. They are often in dual or quadruple mounts, allowing a high rate of fire. In addition, most anti-aircraft guns can be used in a direct-fire role against surface targets to great effect
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Self-propelled Gun
A self-propelled gun (SPG) is a form of self-propelled artillery, and in modern use is usually used to refer to artillery pieces such as howitzers. Self-propelled guns are mounted on a motorised wheeled or tracked chassis (because of this they are sometimes visually similar to tanks). As such the gun can be maneuvered under its own power as opposed to a towed gun that relies upon a vehicle or other means to be moved on the battlefield. Self-propelled guns are combat support weapons; they are employed by combat support units fighting in support of, or attached to, the main combat units: infantry and armour (tanks). Self-propelled guns are best at providing indirect fire but can give direct fire when needed. It may be armoured, in which case it is considered an armoured fighting vehicle (AFV)
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Tank Destroyer
A tank destroyer or tank hunter is a type of armoured fighting vehicle, armed with a direct-fire artillery gun or missile launcher, with limited operational capacities and designed specifically to engage enemy tanks. Tanks are armoured fighting vehicles designed for front-line combat, combining operational mobility and tactical offensive and defensive capabilities; tanks perform all primary tasks of the armoured troops. The tank destroyer on the other hand is specifically designed to take on enemy tanks and other armoured fighting vehicles.[1] Many are based on a tracked tank chassis, while others are wheeled. Since World War II, gun-armed tank destroyers have fallen out of favor as armies have favored multirole main battle tanks. However, lightly armored anti-tank guided missile (ATGM) carriers are commonly used for supplementary long-range anti-tank work
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Self-propelled Artillery
Self-propelled artillery
Self-propelled artillery
(also called mobile artillery or locomotive artillery) is artillery equipped with its own propulsion system to move towards its target. Within the term are covered self-propelled guns (or howitzers) and rocket artillery. They are high mobility vehicles, usually based on continuous tracks carrying either a large howitzer, field gun, a mortar or some form of rocket or missile launcher. They are usually used for long-range indirect bombardment support on the battlefield. In the past, self-propelled artillery has included direct-fire vehicles, such as assault guns and tank destroyers. These have been heavily armoured vehicles, the former providing close fire-support for infantry and the latter acting as specialized anti-tank vehicles. Modern self-propelled artillery vehicles may superficially resemble tanks, but they are generally lightly armoured, too lightly to survive in direct-fire combat
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