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Headgear
Headgear, headwear or headdress is the name given to any element of clothing which is worn on one's head. Headgears serve a variety of purposes:protection (against impact, cold, heat, rain and other precipitation, glare, sunburn, sunstroke, dust, contaminants, etc.) to keep hair contained or tidy decoration or fashion religious purposes medical purposes modesty; social convention distinction; a badge of office sport uniformContents1 Overview of headgear types1.1 Bonnets 1.2 Caps 1.3 Crowns 1.4 Fillets 1.5 Hair
Hair
covers 1.6 Hats 1.7 Helmets 1.8 Hoods 1.9 Masks 1.10
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Hats (party)
The Hats (Swedish: Hattarna) were a Swedish political faction active during the Age of Liberty
Age of Liberty
(1719–1772). Their name derives from the tricorne hat worn by officers and gentlemen. They vied for power with the opposing Caps party. The Hats, who ruled Sweden
Sweden
from 1738 to 1765, advocated an alliance with France
France
and an assertive foreign policy, especially towards Russia. During their tenure, they involved Sweden in two expensive and disastrous wars, in the 1740s and 1750s. Policy[edit] Count Arvid Horn, leader of the Caps, had governed Sweden
Sweden
since 1719. Following Sweden's defeat in the Great Northern War, he had reversed the traditional policy of Sweden
Sweden
by keeping France
France
at a distance, drawing near to Great Britain, and making no significant effort to regain Sweden's lost Baltic empire
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Metal
A metal (from Greek μέταλλον métallon, "mine, quarry, metal"[1][2]) is a material (an element, compound, or alloy) that is typically hard when in solid state, opaque, shiny, and has good electrical and thermal conductivity. Metals are generally malleable—that is, they can be hammered or pressed permanently out of shape without breaking or cracking—as well as fusible (able to be fused or melted) and ductile (able to be drawn out into a thin wire).[3] Around 90 of the 118 elements in the periodic table are metals; the others are nonmetals or metalloids, though elements near the boundaries of each category have been assigned variably to either (hence the lack of an exact count). Some elements appear in both metallic and non-metallic forms. Astrophysicists use the term "metal" to refer collectively to all elements in a star that are heavier than the lightest two, hydrogen and helium, and not just traditional metals
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Leather
Leather
Leather
is a durable and flexible material created by tanning animal rawhides, mostly cattle hide. It can be produced at manufacturing scales ranging from cottage industry to heavy industry. Leather
Leather
is used to make various goods, including clothing (especially footwear), in bookbinding, and as a furniture covering
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Textile
A textile[1] is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres (yarn or thread). Yarn
Yarn
is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, hemp, or other materials to produce long strands.[2] Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or felting. The related words fabric[3] and cloth[4] are often used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. A textile is any material made of interlacing fibres, including carpeting and geotextiles. A fabric is a material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.)
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Circlet
A circlet is a piece of headgear that is similar to a diadem or a chaplet.[1][2][3] The word circlet is also used to refer to the base of a crown or a coronet with or without a cap.[4][5] Diadem
Diadem
and circlet are often used interchangeably,[6] and "open crowns" with no arches (as opposed to "closed crowns"), have also been referred to as circlets.[7] In Greek this is known as stephanos and in Latin
Latin
as corona aperta. Stephanos is associated with laurel wreaths and the crown of thorns said to have been placed on the head of Jesus.[8] See also[edit]Corolla TiaraReferences[edit]^ Iorwerth Eiddon Stephen Edwards (1976). Tutankhamun's Jewelry. Egypt: Metropolitan Museum of Art. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-87099-155-4.  ^ John Steane (2003). The Archaeology of the Medieval English Monarchy. Routledge. p. 31. ISBN 978-1-134-64159-8.  ^ Albert Barnes (1859)
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Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
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Russian Culture
Russian culture
Russian culture
has a long history. Russia
Russia
claimed a long tradition of dividend in many aspects of the arts,[1] especially when it comes to literature,[2] philosophy, classical music,[3][4] ballet,[5] architecture, painting, cinema,[6] animation and politics, which all had considerable influence on world culture. The country also has a flavorful material culture and a tradition in technology. Russian culture
Russian culture
grew from that of the East Slavs, with their pagan beliefs and specific way of life in the wooded areas of far Eastern Europe. Early Russian culture
Russian culture
was much influenced by neighbouring Finno-Ugric tribes and by the nomadic peoples of the Pontic steppe (mainly of Kipchak and Iranic origin)
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Tiara
A tiara (from Latin: tiara, from Ancient Greek: τιάρα) is a jeweled, ornamental crown traditionally worn by women. It is worn during formal occasions, particularly if the dress code is white tie.[2]Contents1 History 2 Late 18th century-present 3 Costume jewellery tiaras3.1 Stage and screen4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]This Fayum mummy portrait shows a woman wearing a golden wreath, c. AD 100-110.Today, the word "tiara" is often used interchangeably with the word "diadem", and tiara is often translated to a word similar to diadem in other languages.[3] Both words come from head ornaments worn by ancient men and women to denote high status. As Geoffrey Munn
Geoffrey Munn
notes, "The word 'tiara' is actually Persian in origin — the name first denoted the high-peaked head-dresses of Persian kings, which were encircled by 'diadems' (bands of purple and white decoration)
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Ukrainian Culture
Ukrainian culture
Ukrainian culture
and customs of Ukraine
Ukraine
and ethnic Ukrainians. Ukraine
Ukraine
has a shared culture and history with neighboring nations, dating back to the 9th century and the Land of Rus. Mutual customs are shared among the cultures of Ukraine, Belarus, Ukrainian Cossacks
Ukrainian Cossacks
and Russians. Ukrainian customs are heavily influenced by the Eastern Orthodox Church and traditions from Slavic mythology
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Caps (party)
The Caps (Swedish: Mössorna) were a political faction during the Age of Liberty (1719–1772) in Sweden. The primary rivals of the Caps were known as the Hats. The Hats are actually responsible for the Caps' name, as it comes from a contraction of Night-cap, a name used to suggest that the Caps were the soft and timid party
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Swim Cap
A swimming cap, swim cap or bathing cap, is a tightly fitted, skin-tight garment, commonly made from silicone, latex or lycra, worn on the head by recreational and competitive swimmers. Caps are worn for various reasons. Some facilities require the wearing of swim caps, in order to protect filters from becoming clogged with loose hairs which fall from the head of swimmers who are not wearing a cap, or to ensure long loose hair does not get caught in equipment. Caps are also sometimes worn in an attempt to keep hair relatively dry or protect from chlorinated water, to keep the sun off the hair, and also, when a cap is worn with ear plugs, in order to keep water out of the ears. Competitive swim caps also reduce drag in the water caused by loose hair. During longer swimming sessions, a swim cap keeps the wearer's head warm
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Muslin
Muslin
Muslin
(/ˈmʌzlɪn/ or /ˈmjuːslɪn/[citation needed]), also mousseline, is a cotton fabric of plain weave.[1][2] It is made in a wide range of weights from delicate sheers to coarse sheeting.[2][3] They were imported into Europe from India in the 17th century and were later manufactured in Scotland and England
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Napoléon Bonaparte
Napoléon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French statesman and military leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars. As Napoleon, he was Emperor of the French
Emperor of the French
from 1804 until 1814, and again briefly in 1815 during the Hundred Days. Napoleon
Napoleon
dominated European and global affairs for more than a decade while leading France
France
against a series of coalitions in the Napoleonic Wars. He won most of these wars and the vast majority of his battles, building a large empire that ruled over continental Europe before its final collapse in 1815. He is considered one of the greatest commanders in history, and his wars and campaigns are studied at military schools worldwide
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Royal Regiment Of Scotland
The Royal Regiment of Scotland
Royal Regiment of Scotland
is the senior and only Scottish line infantry regiment of the British Army
British Army
Infantry. It consists of four regular and two reserve battalions, plus an incremental company, each formerly an individual regiment (with the exception of the first battalion, which is an amalgamation of two regiments)
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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