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Headgear
HEADGEAR, HEADWEAR or HEADDRESS is the name given to any element of clothing which is worn on one's head
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Circlet
A CIRCLET is a piece of headgear that is similar to a diadem or a chaplet . The word circlet is also used to refer to the base of a crown or a coronet with or without a cap . Diadem
Diadem
and circlet are often used interchangeably, and "open crowns" with no arches (as opposed to "closed crowns "), have also been referred to as circlets. In Greek this is known as stephanos and in Latin
Latin
as corona aperta. Stephanos is associated with laurel wreaths and the crown of thorns said to have been placed on the head of Jesus
Jesus
. SEE ALSO * Corolla * Tiara
Tiara
REFERENCES * ^ Iorwerth Eiddon Stephen Edwards (1976). Tutankhamun\'s Jewelry. Egypt: Metropolitan Museum of Art. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-87099-155-4 . * ^ John Steane (2003). The Archaeology of the Medieval English Monarchy. Routledge. p. 31. ISBN 978-1-134-64159-8 . * ^ Albert Barnes (1859)
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Textile
A TEXTILE or CLOTH is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres (yarn or thread ). Yarn is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool , flax , cotton , hemp , or other material to produce long strands. Textiles are formed by weaving , knitting , crocheting , knotting , or felting . The words FABRIC and cloth are used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking ) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. Textile refers to any material made of interlacing fibres. A fabric is a material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.). Cloth may be used synonymously with fabric but is often a finished piece of fabric used for a specific purpose (e.g., table cloth)
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Leather
LEATHER is a durable and flexible material created by tanning animal rawhide and skin, often cattle hide. It can be produced at manufacturing scales ranging from cottage industry to heavy industry . People use leather to make various goods—including clothing (e.g., shoes, hats, jackets, skirts, trousers, and belts), bookbinding , leather wallpaper , and as a furniture covering. It is produced in a wide variety of types and styles, decorated by a wide range of techniques
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Russian Culture
RUSSIAN CULTURE has a long history. Russia
Russia
can claim a long tradition of dividend in many aspects of the arts, especially when it comes to literature and philosophy , classical music and ballet , architecture and painting , cinema and animation and politics , which all had considerable influence on world culture. The country also has a flavorful material culture and a tradition in technology . Russian culture
Russian culture
grew from that of the East Slavs
East Slavs
, with their pagan beliefs and specific way of life in the wooded areas of far Eastern Europe. Early Russian culture
Russian culture
was much influenced by neighbouring Finno-Ugric tribes and by the nomadic peoples of the Pontic steppe (mainly of Kipchak and Iranic origin)
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Tiara
A TIARA (from Latin : tiara, from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
: τιάρα) is a jeweled, ornamental crown traditionally worn by women. It is worn during formal occasions, particularly if the dress code is white tie . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Late 18th century-present * 3 Costume jewellery tiaras * 3.1 Stage and screen * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links HISTORY This Fayum mummy portrait shows a woman wearing a golden wreath, c. AD 100-110. Today, the word "tiara" is often used interchangeably with the word "diadem ", and tiara is often translated to a word similar to diadem in other languages. Both words come from head ornaments worn by ancient men and women to denote high status. As Geoffrey Munn notes, "The word 'tiara' is actually Persian in origin — the name first denoted the high-peaked head-dresses of Persian kings, which were encircled by 'diadems' (bands of purple and white decoration)
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Royal Regiment Of Scotland
The ROYAL REGIMENT OF SCOTLAND is the senior and only Scottish line infantry regiment of the British Army
British Army
Infantry
Infantry
. It consists of four regular and two reserve battalions , plus an incremental company , each formerly an individual regiment (with the exception of the first battalion, which is an amalgamation of two regiments). However, each battalion maintains its former regimental Pipes "> Traditional recruiting districts of the five active regular battalions, a system originally introduced by the Cardwell Reforms in 1871 All battalions in the Royal Regiment of Scotland, to preserve regional ties and former regimental identities, took the name of their former individual regiments
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Muslin
MUSLIN (/ˈmʌslᵻn/ or /ˈmjuːslᵻn/ ) is a cotton fabric of plain weave. It is made in a wide range of weights from delicate sheers to coarse sheeting. It gets its name from the city of Mosul
Mosul
, Iraq
Iraq
, where it may have been first manufactured. Early muslin was handwoven of uncommonly delicate handspun yarn, especially in the region around Dhaka
Dhaka
, Bengal (now Bangladesh
Bangladesh
), where it may have originated from. It was imported into Europe for much of the 17th and early 18th centuries. Fine linen muslin was formerly known as SINDON. In 2013, the traditional art of weaving Jamdani
Jamdani
muslin in Bangladesh was included in the list of Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO
UNESCO

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Hats (party)
The HATS (Swedish : Hattarna) were a Swedish political faction active during the Age of Liberty (1719–1772). Their name derives from the tricorne hat worn by officers and gentlemen. They vied for power with the opposing Caps party. The Hats, who ruled Sweden from 1738 to 1765, advocated an alliance with France and an assertive foreign policy, especially towards Russia . During their tenure, they involved Sweden in two expensive and disastrous wars, in the 1740s and 1750s . POLICYCount Arvid Horn , leader of the Caps, had governed Sweden since 1719. Following Sweden's defeat in the Great Northern War , he had reversed the traditional policy of Sweden by keeping France at a distance, drawing near to Great Britain , and making no significant effort to regain Sweden's lost Baltic empire. Those opposed to this peaceful policy derisively nicknamed his adherents "Night-caps", and these epithets became party badges when the estates met in 1738
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Bead
A BEAD is a small, decorative object that is formed in a variety of shapes and sizes of a material such as stone, bone, shell, glass, plastic, wood or pearl and that a small hole is drilled for threading or stringing. Beads range in size from under 1 millimetre (0.039 in) to over 1 centimetre (0.39 in) in diameter. A pair of beads made from Nassarius
Nassarius
sea snail shells, approximately 100,000 years old, are thought to be the earliest known examples of jewellery . Beadwork
Beadwork
is the art or craft of making things with beads. Beads can be woven together with specialized thread , strung onto thread or soft, flexible wire , or adhered to a surface (e.g. fabric , clay )
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Metal
A METAL (from Greek μέταλλον métallon, "mine, quarry, metal" ) is a material (an element , compound , or alloy ) that is typically hard, opaque , shiny, and has good electrical and thermal conductivity . Metals are generally malleable —that is, they can be hammered or pressed permanently out of shape without breaking or cracking—as well as fusible (able to be fused or melted) and ductile (able to be drawn out into a thin wire). About 91 of the 118 elements in the periodic table are metals; the others are nonmetals or metalloids . Some elements appear in both metallic and non-metallic forms. Astrophysicists use the term "metal" to collectively describe all elements other than hydrogen and helium , the simplest two, in a star. The star fuses smaller atoms, mostly hydrogen and helium, to make larger ones over its lifetime. In that sense, the metallicity of an object is the proportion of its matter made up of all heavier chemical elements, not just traditional metals
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Contact Sport
CONTACT SPORTS are sports that emphasize or require physical contact between players. Some sports, such as mixed martial arts , are scored on impacting an opponent, while others, including rugby football , require tackling of players. These sports are often known as full-contact, as the sport cannot be undertaken without contact. Other sports have contact, but such events are illegal under the rules of the game or are accidental and do not form part of the sport. The contact in contact sports can also include impact via a piece of sporting equipment , such as being struck by a hockey stick or football . Non-contact sports are those where participants should have no possible means of touching, such as sprinting, swimming, darts or snooker, where players use separate lanes or take turns of play. Consideration should also be given to other sports such as Moto-cross and Bicycle Moto-cross (BMX) and cycling which all involve riding/racing in packs of riders
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Football Helmet
The FOOTBALL HELMET is a piece of protective equipment used mainly in American football
American football
and Canadian football
Canadian football
. It consists of a hard plastic shell with thick padding on the inside, a face mask made of one or more plastic-coated metal bars, and a chinstrap. Each position has a different type of face mask to balance protection and visibility, and some players add polycarbonate visors to their helmets, which are used to protect their eyes from glare and impacts. Helmets are a requirement at all levels of organized football, except for non-tackle variations such as flag football . Although they are protective, players can and do still suffer head injuries such as concussions
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Mary I Of England
MARY I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558) was the Queen of England and Ireland from July 1553 until her death. Her executions of Protestants led to the posthumous sobriquet "BLOODY MARY". She was the only child of Henry VIII
Henry VIII
by his first wife Catherine of Aragon to survive to adulthood. Her younger half-brother Edward VI (son of Henry and Jane Seymour ) succeeded their father in 1547. When Edward became mortally ill in 1553, he attempted to remove Mary from the line of succession because of religious differences. On his death, their first cousin once removed, Lady Jane Grey , was proclaimed queen. Mary assembled a force in East Anglia and deposed Jane, who was ultimately beheaded. Mary was—excluding the disputed reigns of Jane and the Empress Matilda
Empress Matilda
—the first queen regnant of England
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Battle
A BATTLE is a combat in warfare between two or more armed forces , or combatants . A war sometimes consists of many battles. Battles generally are well defined in duration, area, and force commitment. A battle with only limited engagement between the forces and without decisive results is sometimes called a skirmish . Wars and military campaigns are guided by strategy , whereas battles take place on a level of planning and execution known as operational mobility . German strategist Carl von Clausewitz
Carl von Clausewitz
stated that "the employment of battles ... to achieve the object of war" was the essence of strategy
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Napoléon Bonaparte
NAPOLéON BONAPARTE (/nəˈpoʊliən ˈboʊnəpɑːrt/ ; French: ; 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French military and political leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution
French Revolution
and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars
French Revolutionary Wars
. As NAPOLEON I, he was Emperor of the French from 1804 until 1814, and again briefly in 1815 (during the Hundred Days ). Napoleon
Napoleon
dominated European and global affairs for more than a decade while leading France
France
against a series of coalitions in the Napoleonic Wars
Napoleonic Wars
. He won most of these wars and the vast majority of his battles, building a large empire that ruled over continental Europe before its final collapse in 1815
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