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Hawker P.1072
The Hawker P.1072
Hawker P.1072
was a 1949 experimental British aircraft acting as test bed for the Armstrong Siddeley Snarler
Armstrong Siddeley Snarler
rocket booster. It was the prototype Hawker Sea Hawk
Hawker Sea Hawk
modified to install the rocket in the tail.Contents1 Development 2 Specifications (P.1072) 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksDevelopment[edit] After World War II
World War II
Hawker was working on a new fighter under their internal designation P.1040 which later became the Hawker Sea Hawk. Armstrong Siddeley had begun work in 1946 to develop a liquid-fuelled rocket motor (to be used as a booster unit for fighters) for the Ministry of Supply
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Hawker Hedgehog
The Hawker Hedgehog was a three-seat reconnaissance biplane, to be used for naval scouting, produced to meet Air Ministry Specification 37/22. It was designed in 1923, and had its first flight the next year, piloted by FP Raynham. The crew consisted of the pilot, an observer and an air gunner. Construction was typical of the period: a wooden structure covered with fabric. The powerplant was a nine-cylinder Bristol Jupiter IV radial engine driving a two-bladed wooden propeller. While testing was successful, on completion of the flight tests, the project was cancelled. This was due to the Hedgehog's performance not being sufficiently better than the existing aircraft used for Naval reconnaissance, the Avro Bison and Blackburn Blackburn. Consequently, only one prototype was built. The armament of the aircraft was one fixed forward-firing .303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers gun and one .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun on a Scarff ring in the rear cockpit
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Hawker P.V.3
The Hawker P.V.3 was a British single-engined biplane fighter prototype of the 1930s. Only a single example was built, the Gloster Gladiator being selected instead to fulfill the requirement to which it was designed.Contents1 Design and development 2 Specifications 3 References 4 External linksDesign and development[edit] In 1930 the British Air Ministry circulated a draft version of Specification F.7/30 for a heavily armed day and night fighter around likely manufacturers.[1] The new fighter was to have a speed of at least 250 mph (400 km/h) and a good climb rate
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Hawker Hurricane
The Hawker Hurricane
Hawker Hurricane
is a British single-seat fighter aircraft of the 1930s–1940s that was designed and predominantly built by Hawker Aircraft Ltd. for service with the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF). Although overshadowed in the public consciousness by the Supermarine Spitfire's role during Battle of Britain
Battle of Britain
in 1940, the Hurricane actually inflicted 60 percent of the losses sustained by the Luftwaffe
Luftwaffe
in the engagement. The Hurricane went on to fight in all the major theatres of Second World War. The Hurricane originated from discussions during the early 1930s between RAF officials and British aircraft designer Sir Sydney Camm
Sydney Camm
on the topic of a proposed monoplane derivative of the Hawker Fury biplane
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Hawker Typhoon
The Hawker Typhoon
Hawker Typhoon
(Tiffy in RAF slang) is a British single-seat fighter-bomber, produced by Hawker Aircraft. It was intended to be a medium–high altitude interceptor, as a replacement for the Hawker Hurricane, but several design problems were encountered and it never completely satisfied this requirement.[3] The Typhoon was originally designed to mount twelve .303 inch (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns and be powered by the latest 2000 hp engines
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Hawker Tempest
The Hawker Tempest
Hawker Tempest
is a British fighter aircraft primarily used by the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF) in the Second World War. The Tempest, originally known as the Typhoon II, was an improved derivative of the Hawker Typhoon, intended to address the Typhoon's unexpected fall-off of performance at high altitude by replacing its wing with a thinner laminar flow design. Having diverged considerably from the Typhoon, it was chosen to rename the aircraft Tempest
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Hawker Sea Fury
The Hawker Sea Fury
Hawker Sea Fury
is a British fighter aircraft designed and manufactured by Hawker. It was the last propeller-driven fighter to serve with the Royal Navy, and one of the fastest production single seat piston-engined aircraft ever built.[2] Developed during the Second World War, the Sea Fury entered service two years after the war ended. The Sea Fury proved to be a popular aircraft with a number of overseas militaries, and was used during the Korean War
Korean War
in the early 1950s, as well as against the 1961 Bay of Pigs Invasion
Bay of Pigs Invasion
of Cuba. The Sea Fury's development was formally initiated in 1943 in response to a wartime requirement of the RAF, thus the aircraft was initially named Fury
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Hawker P.1081
The Hawker P.1081, also known as the "Australian Fighter" was a British jet aircraft from the mid-twentieth century.Contents1 Design and development 2 Operators 3 Specifications 4 See also 5 ReferencesDesign and development[edit] In 1949, the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) began assessing replacements for two fighters built in Australia: the Mustangs built by Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation (CAC) and Vampires of De Havilland Australia (DHA).[1] A series of designs were considered, including the Grumman F9F Panther and the CAC CA-23 – an unconventional, twin-jet all-weather design by CAC. Hawker Aircraft also submitted a proposal, for a swept-wing, swept-tail fighter based on the Hawker P.1052, but using a Rolls-Royce Tay engine
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Hawker P.1103
The Hawker P.1103 was a design by Hawker Aircraft to meet the British Operational Requirement F.155; it did progress further than the drawing board.Contents1 Background 2 1957 Defence White Paper 3 Specifications 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingBackground[edit] Operational Requirement F.155 was an Operational Requirement issued by the British Ministry of Supply in 1955 for an interceptor aircraft to defend the United Kingdom from high flying supersonic bombers. F.155 specified exacting demands:The capability of making an intercept within 20 minutes of target contact (250 miles from the UK) with a target speed of Mach 1+ Ceiling: 60,000 ft (18,000 m) Armament: a mixture of infra-red guided missiles and radar guided missiles Crew: A crew of two was specified because of the anticipated workload: pilot plus weapons systems operator (WSO)/navigatorThe Ministry of Supply made clear in the requirement that the plane and missiles should be treat
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Hawker P.1121
The Hawker P.1121
Hawker P.1121
is a cancelled British supersonic fighter aircraft. It was designed by Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
by a team headed by Sir Sydney Camm
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Hawker Siddeley P.1127
The Hawker P.1127 and the Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
Kestrel FGA.1 are the experimental and development aircraft that led to the Hawker Siddeley Harrier, the first vertical and/or short take-off and landing (V/STOL) jet fighter-bomber. P.1127 development began in 1957, taking advantage of the Bristol Engine Company's choice to invest in the creation of the Pegasus
Pegasus
vectored-thrust engine. Testing began in July 1960 and by the end of the year the aircraft had achieved both vertical take-off and horizontal flight
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Hawker Siddeley P.1154
The Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
P.1154 was a planned supersonic vertical/short take-off and landing (V/STOL) fighter aircraft designed by Hawker Siddeley Aviation (HSA). Developed alongside the subsonic and smaller Hawker Siddeley P.1127/Kestrel, the P.1154 was derived from the P.1150. The P.1150 proposal did not meet NATO
NATO
Basic Military Requirement 3 and, consequently, the P.1154 was born. This Mach 2-capable aircraft retained plenum chamber burning previously designed for the P.1150. Although the technical winner of eleven submissions, follow-on testing and production for the P.1154 did not proceed as a result of political strife. Meanwhile, Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
considered modifying the airframe for a joint specification for an aircraft by the RAF and Royal Navy. Between 1961 and 1965 the two services harmonised their specifications to preserve design commonality
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Hawker P.V.4
The Hawker P.V.4 was a 1930s British biplane aircraft built by Hawker Aircraft in competition for a government order for a general-purpose military aircraft.Contents1 Design and development 2 Testing 3 Specification (with the Pegasus X engine) 4 See also 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Bibliography6 External linksDesign and development[edit] In 1931, the British Air Ministry issued a their Specification G.4/31 for a "Standard General Purpose" aircraft. The duties were to include liaison, bombing (both day and night), dive bombing, torpedo bombing, and reconnaissance. As none of the competing prototypes ordered for the competition could carry out all of the roles, and as individually aircraft of the Hawker Hart series could perform most of these duties, with the Hart having excellent handling in a dive,[1] Hawkers decided to base their entry on the Hind development of the Hart
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Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
was a group of British manufacturing companies engaged in aircraft production. Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
combined the legacies of several British aircraft manufacturers, emerging through a series of mergers and acquisitions as one of only two such major British companies in the 1960s. In 1977, Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
became a founding component of the nationalised British Aerospace
Aerospace
(BAe). Hawker Siddeley also operated in other industrial markets, such as locomotive building (through its ownership of Brush Traction) and diesel engine manufacture (through its ownership of Lister Petter)
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Hawker Hart
The Hawker Hart
Hawker Hart
was a British two-seater biplane light bomber aircraft of the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF). It was designed during the 1920s by Sydney Camm
Sydney Camm
and manufactured by Hawker Aircraft. The Hart was a prominent British aircraft in the inter-war period, but was obsolete and already side-lined for newer monoplane aircraft designs by the start of the Second World War, playing only minor roles in the conflict before being retired. Several major variants of the Hart were developed, including a navalised version for the Royal Navy's aircraft carriers
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Hawker Cygnet
The Hawker Cygnet
Hawker Cygnet
was a British ultralight biplane aircraft of the 1920s.Contents1 Background 2 Design 3 Postwar history 4 Specifications 5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 Bibliography7 External linksBackground[edit] In 1924, the Royal Aero Club
Royal Aero Club
organized a Light Aircraft Competition. £3000 was offered in prizes. An entry was made by Hawker Aircraft, which was a design by Sydney Camm, the Cygnet. Camm had joined Hawker the previous year. Two aircraft were built (G-EBMB and G-EBJH) and were entered in the competition, held in 1924 at Lympne Aerodrome, by T. O. M. Sopwith and Fred Sigrist. The aircraft were flown by Longton and Raynham and came in 4th and 3rd places respectively. In 1925, G-EBMB was entered again in the 100 mi (161 km) International Handicap Race, this time flown by George Bulman, who won at a speed of 75.6 mph (121.7 km/h)
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