HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Hauppauge MediaMVP
The Hauppauge MediaMVP
Hauppauge MediaMVP
is a network media player. It consists of a hardware unit with remote control, along with software for a Windows PC. Out of the box, it is capable of playing video and audio, displaying pictures, and "tuning in" to Internet radio
Internet radio
stations. Alternative software is also available to extend its capabilities. It can be used as a front-end for various PVR projects. The MediaMVP is popular with some PVR enthusiasts because it is inexpensive and relatively easy to modify.[citation needed]Contents1 Capabilities1.1 Video 1.2 Audio 1.3 Photos 1.4 Internet radio 1.5 Other capabilities2 Hardware2.1 Connectivity 2.2 Processor, RAM and firmware3 Hacks3.1 Serial port 3.2 Alternative software and firmware4 Notes4.1 Internet radio5 See also 6 External linksCapabilities[edit] The MediaMVP can stream audio and video content from a host PC running Windows
[...More...]

"Hauppauge MediaMVP" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

CPU
A central processing unit (CPU) is the electronic circuitry within a computer that carries out the instructions of a computer program by performing the basic arithmetic, logical, control and input/output (I/O) operations specified by the instructions. The computer industry has used the term "central processing unit" at least since the early 1960s.[1] Traditionally, the term "CPU" refers to a processor, more specifically to its processing unit and control unit (CU), distinguishing these core elements of a computer from external components such as main memory and I/O
I/O
circuitry.[2] The form, design, and implementation of CPUs have changed over the course of their history, but their fundamental operation remains almost unchanged
[...More...]

"CPU" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Random Access Memory
Random-access memory
Random-access memory
(RAM /ræm/) is a form of computer data storage that stores data and machine code currently being used. A random-access memory device allows data items to be read or written in almost the same amount of time irrespective of the physical location of data inside the memory. In contrast, with other direct-access data storage media such as hard disks, CD-RWs, DVD-RWs and the older magnetic tapes and drum memory, the time required to read and write data items varies significantly depending on their physical locations on the recording medium, due to mechanical limitations such as media rotation speeds and arm movement. RAM contains multiplexing and demultiplexing circuitry, to connect the data lines to the addressed storage for reading or writing the entry. Usually more than one bit of storage is accessed by the same address, and RAM devices often have multiple data lines and are said to be "8-bit" or "16-bit", etc
[...More...]

"Random Access Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Set Top Box
A set-top box (STB) or set-top unit (STU) (one type also colloquially known as a cable box) is an information appliance device that generally contains a TV-tuner input and displays output to a television set and an external source of signal, turning the source signal into content in a form that then be displayed on the television screen or other display device
[...More...]

"Set Top Box" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Megabyte
The megabyte is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information. Its recommended unit symbol is MB. The unit prefix mega is a multiplier of 1000000 (106) in the International System of Units (SI).[1] Therefore, one megabyte is one million bytes of information. This definition has been incorporated into the International System of Quantities. However, in the computer and information technology fields, several other definitions are used that arose for historical reasons of convenience. A common usage has been to designate one megabyte as 1048576bytes (220 B), a measurement that conveniently expresses the binary multiples inherent in digital computer memory architectures. However, most standards bodies have deprecated this usage in favor of a set of binary prefixes,[2] in which this quantity is designated by the unit mebibyte (MiB)
[...More...]

"Megabyte" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

SDRAM
Synchronous dynamic random-access memory
Synchronous dynamic random-access memory
(SDRAM) is any dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) where the operation of its external pin interface is coordinated by an externally supplied clock signal. DRAM integrated circuits (ICs) produced from the early 1970s to mid-1990s used an asynchronous interface, in which input control signals have a direct effect on internal functions only delayed by the trip across its semiconductor pathways. S DRAM
DRAM
has a synchronous interface, whereby changes on control inputs are recognised after a rising edge of its clock input. In S DRAM
DRAM
families standardized by JEDEC, the clock signal controls the stepping of an internal finite state machine that responds to incoming commands. These commands can be pipelined to improve performance, with previously started operations completing while new commands are received
[...More...]

"SDRAM" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Linux
Linux
Linux
(/ˈlɪnəks/ ( listen) LIN-əks)[9][10] is a family of free and open-source software operating systems built around the Linux
Linux
kernel. Typically, Linux
Linux
is packaged in a form known as a Linux distribution (or distro for short) for both desktop and server use. The defining component of a Linux distribution
Linux distribution
is the Linux kernel,[11] an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991, by Linus Torvalds.[12][13][14] Many Linux
Linux
distributions use the word "Linux" in their name
[...More...]

"Linux" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hack (technology Slang)
A computer hacker is any skilled computer expert that uses their technical knowledge to overcome a problem. While "hacker" can refer to any skilled computer programmer, the term has become associated in popular culture with a "security hacker", someone who, with their technical knowledge, uses bugs or exploits to break into computer systems.Contents1 Definitions 2 Types2.1 Hacker
Hacker
culture 2.2 Security related hacking3 Motives 4 Overlaps and differences 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading7.1 Computer
Computer
security 7.2 Free software/open source8 External linksDefinitionsThis section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
[...More...]

"Hack (technology Slang)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

SPDIF
S/PDIF
S/PDIF
(Sony/ Philips
Philips
Digital Interface)[1][2] is a type of digital audio interconnect used in consumer audio equipment to output audio over reasonably short distances. The signal is transmitted over either a coaxial cable with RCA connectors or a fibre optic cable with TOSLINK
TOSLINK
connectors
[...More...]

"SPDIF" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

RS-232
In telecommunications, RS-232, Recommended Standard 232[1] is a standard introduced in 1960[2] for serial communication transmission of data. It formally defines the signals connecting between a DTE (data terminal equipment) such as a computer terminal, and a DCE (data circuit-terminating equipment or data communication equipment), such as a modem. The RS-232
RS-232
standard had been commonly used in computer serial ports. The standard defines the electrical characteristics and timing of signals, the meaning of signals, and the physical size and pinout of connectors
[...More...]

"RS-232" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Serial Port
In computing, a serial port is a serial communication interface through which information transfers in or out one bit at a time (in contrast to a parallel port).[1] Throughout most of the history of personal computers, data was transferred through serial ports to devices such as modems, terminals, and various peripherals. While such interfaces as Ethernet, FireWire, and USB
USB
all send data as a serial stream, the term "serial port" usually identifies hardware more or less compliant to the RS-232
RS-232
standard, intended to interface with a modem or with a similar communication device. Modern computers without serial ports may require serial-to-USB converters to allow compatibility with RS-232
RS-232
serial devices. Serial ports are still used in applications such as industrial automation systems, scientific instruments, point of sale systems and some industrial and consumer products
[...More...]

"Serial Port" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

System Console
The system console, computer console, root console, operator's console, or simply console is the text entry and display device for system administration messages, particularly those from the BIOS
BIOS
or boot loader, the kernel, from the init system and from the system logger. It is a physical device consisting of a keyboard and a screen, and traditionally is a text terminal, but may also be a graphical terminal. System consoles are generalized to computer terminals, which are abstracted respectively by virtual consoles and terminal emulators
[...More...]

"System Console" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

RCA Connector
An RCA
RCA
connector, sometimes called a phono connector or (in other languages) Cinch connector, is a type of electrical connector commonly used to carry audio and video signals. The name RCA
RCA
derives from the Radio Corporation of America, which introduced the design by the early 1940s for internal connection of the pickup to the chassis in home radio-phonograph consoles. It was originally a low-cost, simple design, intended only for mating and disconnection when servicing the console. Refinement came with later designs, although they remained compatible. RCA
RCA
connectors began to replace the older quarter-inch phone connectors for many other applications in the consumer audio world when component high-fidelity systems started becoming popular in the 1950s
[...More...]

"RCA Connector" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Firmware
In electronic systems and computing, firmware[a] is a computer program that provides the low-level control for the device's specific hardware. Firmware
Firmware
can either provide a standardized operating environment for the device's more complex software (allowing more hardware-independence), or, for less complex devices, act as the device's complete operating system, performing all control, monitoring and data manipulation functions. Typical examples of devices containing firmware are embedded systems, consumer appliances, computers, computer peripherals, and others. Almost all electronic devices beyond the simplest contain some firmware. Firmware
Firmware
is held in non-volatile memory devices such as ROM, EPROM, or flash memory. Changing the firmware of a device may rarely or never be done during its lifetime; some firmware memory devices are permanently installed and cannot be changed after manufacture
[...More...]

"Firmware" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

LCD
A liquid-crystal display (LCD) is a flat-panel display or other electronically modulated optical device that uses the light-modulating properties of liquid crystals. Liquid crystals do not emit light directly, instead using a backlight or reflector to produce images in colour or monochrome.[1] LCDs are available to display arbitrary images (as in a general-purpose computer display) or fixed images with low information content, which can be displayed or hidden, such as preset words, digits, and 7-segment
7-segment
displays, as in a digital clock. They use the same basic technology, except that arbitrary images are made up of a large number of small pixels, while other displays have larger elements. LCDs are used in a wide range of applications including LCD televisions, computer monitors, instrument panels, aircraft cockpit displays, and indoor and outdoor signage
[...More...]

"LCD" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Vacuum Fluorescent Display
A vacuum fluorescent display (VFD) is a display device used commonly on consumer electronics equipment such as video cassette recorders, car radios, and microwave ovens. A VFD operates on the principle of cathodoluminescence, roughly similar to a cathode ray tube, but operating at much lower voltages. Each tube in a VFD has a phosphor coated anode that is bombarded by electrons emitted from the cathode filament.[1] In fact, each tube in VFD is a triode vacuum tube because it also has a mesh control grid.[2] Unlike liquid crystal displays, a VFD emits a very bright light with high contrast and can support display elements of various colors. Standard illumination figures for VFDs are around 640 cd/m2 with high-brightness VFDs operating at 4,000 cd/m2, and experimental units as high as 35,000 cd/m2 depending on the drive voltage and its timing.[2] The choice of color (which determines the nature of the phosphor) and display brightness significantly affect the lifetime of the tub
[...More...]

"Vacuum Fluorescent Display" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.