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Harvard College
Harvard College
Harvard College
is the undergraduate liberal arts college of Harvard University. Founded in 1636 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, it is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States[2] and one of the most prestigious in the world.[3]Contents1 History 2 Academics 3 House system 4 Athletics 5 Student organizations 6 Notable alumni 7 Fictional alumni 8 Footnotes 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit] Main article: History of Harvard UniversityView of the ancient buildings belonging to Harvard College, Cambridge, Mass., New York Public LibraryView of freshman dormitories in Harvard YardThe school came into existence in 1636 by vote of the Great and General Court (colonial legislature, second oldest in British America) of the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay Colony—though without a single building, instructor, or student
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Private School
Private schools, also known to many as independent schools, non-governmental, privately funded, or nonstate schools,[1] are not administered by local, state or national governments; parents of kids who attend private schools choose to have their child be in a school where kids are accordingly selected based on either their family income, religious background, or simply based on their academics. Private schools retain the right to select their students and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition, rather than relying on mandatory taxation through public (government) funding; at some private schools students may be able to get a scholarship, lowering this tuition fee, dependent on a student's talents or abilities (e.g. sport scholarship, art scholarship, academic scholarship), need for financial aid, or tax credit scholarships that might be available
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Yale
Yale University
Yale University
is an American private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701, it is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States
United States
and one of the nine Colonial Colleges
Colonial Colleges
chartered before the American Revolution.[6] Chartered by Connecticut
Connecticut
Colony, the "Collegiate School" was established by clergy in Saybrook Colony
Saybrook Colony
to educate Congregational ministers. It moved to New Haven
New Haven
in 1716 and shortly after was renamed Yale College
Yale College
in recognition of a gift from British East India Company governor Elihu Yale
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New England Conservatory Of Music
The New England Conservatory
New England Conservatory
of Music (NEC) in Boston, Massachusetts, is the oldest independent school of music in the United States, and it is widely recognized as one of the country's most distinguished music schools. NEC is especially known for its strings, piano, woodwinds, and brass departments, and its prestigious chamber music program.[3] The conservatory, located on Huntington Avenue
Huntington Avenue
of the Arts near Boston Symphony Hall, is home each year to 750 students pursuing undergraduate and graduate studies along with 1400 more in its Preparatory School as well as the School of Continuing Education. At the collegiate level, NEC offers the Bachelor of Music, Master of Music, and Doctor of Musical Arts, as well as the Undergraduate Diploma, Graduate Diploma, and Artist Diploma
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Academic Major
An academic major is the academic discipline to which an undergraduate student formally commits. A student who successfully completes all courses required for the major qualifies for an undergraduate degree. The word "major" is also sometimes used administratively to refer to the academic discipline pursued by a graduate student or postgraduate student in a master's or doctoral program. An academic major typically requires completion of a combination of prescribed and elective courses in the chosen discipline. In addition, most colleges and universities require that all students take a general core curriculum in the liberal arts. The latitude a student has in choosing courses varies from program to program.[1] An academic major is administered by select faculty in an academic department. A major administered by more than one academic department is called an interdisciplinary major
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Harvard Faculty Of Arts And Sciences
Science
Science
(from Latin scientia, meaning "knowledge")[2][3]:58 is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe.[a] Contemporary science is typically subdivided into the natural sciences which study the material world, the social sciences which study people and societies, and the formal sciences like mathematics
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Indian College
Just a few years after its founding in 1636, Harvard University established the Indian College in the 1640s to educate Native Americans as well as English colonists. It did not attract a sufficient number of students for continued operation and funding from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in New England. The college closed by 1693 and the building was torn down. Its bricks were re-used for another building. In 1997, the college installed a historic plaque in Harvard Yard to commemorate the Indian College.[1] History[edit] In the 1640s, Harvard faced a financial crisis, which it attempted to resolve by obtaining funds to educate and convert local Native Americans. As a result, Harvard's charter of 1650 called for "the Education of the English and Indian Youth of the Country." Harvard obtained funds from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in New England which agreed to build a two-story brick building, the first of its kind,[2] in Harvard Yard
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University Of Cambridge
The University of Cambridge
Cambridge
(informally Cambridge
Cambridge
University)[note 1] is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and granted a royal charter by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge
Cambridge
is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university.[8] The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
after a dispute with the townspeople.[9] The two medieval universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge"
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Oxford University
Coordinates: 51°45′40″N 1°15′12″W / 51.7611°N 1.2534°W / 51.7611; -1.2534University of OxfordCoat of armsLatin: Universitas OxoniensisMotto Dominus Illuminatio Mea (Latin)Motto in English"The Lord is my Light"Established c. 1096; 922 years ago (1096)[1]Endowment £5.069 billion (inc
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Caleb Cheeshahteaumuck
In 1665, Caleb Cheeshahteaumuck became the first Native American to graduate from Harvard University. Cheeshahteaumuck was a member of the Wampanoag tribe in Martha's Vineyard. He and his classmate Joel Hiacoomes[1], also a Wampanoag, were taught on the Vineyard by Peter Folger, the maternal grandfather to Benjamin Franklin.[2] The two went on to attend Elijah Corlett's grammar school in Cambridge in around 1657.[1] In 1661[3] they both entered Harvard's Indian College. Cheeshahteaumuck died of tuberculosis in Watertown, Massachusetts less than a year after graduation.[4][5][6] Apart from Cheeshahteaumuck and Hiacoomes, at least two other Native American students attended the Indian College at this time. Eleazar died before graduating and John Wampus left to become a mariner. Hiacoomes was lost in a shipwreck a few months prior to graduation, while returning to Harvard from Martha's Vineyard
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Room And Board
Room and board describes a situation where, in exchange for money, labor or other considerations, a person is provided with a place to live as well as meals on a comprehensive basis
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Charles River
The Charles River
Charles River
(sometimes called the River Charles or simply the Charles) is an 80 mi (129 km) long river in eastern Massachusetts
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Charlestown, Massachusetts
Charlestown is the oldest neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts, United States.[1] Originally called Mishawum by the Massachusett, it is located on a peninsula north of the Charles River, across from downtown Boston, and also adjoins the Mystic River
Mystic River
and Boston
Boston
Harbor. Charlestown was laid out in 1629 by engineer Thomas Graves, one of its early settlers, in the reign of Charles I of England. It was originally a separate town and the first capital of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Charlestown became a city in 1848 and was annexed by Boston
Boston
on January 5, 1874. With that, it also switched from Middlesex County, to which it had belonged since 1643, to Suffolk County. It has had a substantial Irish American
Irish American
population since the migration of Irish people during the Great Irish Famine
Great Irish Famine
of the 1840s
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Massachusetts Bay Colony
The Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay Colony (1628–1691) was an English settlement on the east coast of North America in the 17th century around the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay, the northernmost of the several colonies later reorganized as the Province of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay. The lands of the settlement were located in southern New England
New England
in what is now Massachusetts, with initial settlements situated on two natural harbors and surrounding land, about 15.4 miles (24.8 km) apart[1]—the areas around the present-day cities of Salem and Boston. The territory nominally administered by the colony included much of present-day central New England, including portions of the U.S. states of Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, and Connecticut. Territory claimed but never administered by the colonial government extended as far west as the Pacific Ocean
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Massachusetts General Court
The Massachusetts
Massachusetts
General Court (formally styled the General Court of Massachusetts)[3] is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The name "General Court" is a hold-over from the earliest days of the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay Colony, when the colonial assembly, in addition to making laws, sat as a judicial court of appeals. Before the adoption of the state constitution in 1780, it was called the Great and General Court, but the official title was shortened by John Adams, author of the state constitution. It is a bicameral body. The upper house is the Massachusetts Senate
Massachusetts Senate
which is composed of 40 members. The lower body, the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
House of Representatives, has 160 members
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Urban Area
An urban area is a human settlement with high population density and infrastructure of built environment. Urban areas are created through urbanization and are categorized by urban morphology as cities, towns, conurbations or suburbs. In urbanism, the term contrasts to rural areas such as villages and hamlets and in urban sociology or urban anthropology it contrasts with natural environment
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