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Hartington, Derbyshire
Hartington is a village in the Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Peak District, England, lying on the River Dove close to the Staffordshire
Staffordshire
border. According to the 2001 census, the parish of Hartington Town Quarter, which also includes Pilsbury, had a population of 345 reducing to 332 at the 2011 Census.[1] Formerly known for cheese-making and the mining of ironstone, limestone and lead, the village is now popular with tourists.Contents1 Architecture 2 Attractions 3 History 4 Cheese 5 Notable residents 6 References 7 External linksArchitecture[edit] Notable buildings in the village include: the market hall (formerly the site of a market); the 13th-century parish church of Saint Giles; and 17th-century Hartington Hall. The prominent Bank House in the centre of the village was built by the former village mill owner, and in the past was used as the village bank
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Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Derbyshire
(/ˈdɑːrbɪʃər, -ʃɪər/) is a county in the East Midlands of England. A substantial portion of the Peak District National Park lies within Derbyshire, containing the southern extremity of the Pennine range of hills which extend into the north of the county. The county contains part of the National Forest, and borders on Greater Manchester
Greater Manchester
to the northwest, West Yorkshire
West Yorkshire
to the north, South Yorkshire
South Yorkshire
to the northeast, Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
to the east, Leicestershire
Leicestershire
to the southeast, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
to the west and southwest and Cheshire
Cheshire
also to the west
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Lead
Lead
Lead
is a chemical element with symbol Pb (from the Latin
Latin
plumbum) and atomic number 82. It is a heavy metal that is denser than most common materials. Lead
Lead
is soft and malleable, and has a relatively low melting point. When freshly cut, lead is bluish-white; it tarnishes to a dull gray color when exposed to air. Lead
Lead
has the highest atomic number of any stable element and three of its isotopes each conclude a major decay chain of heavier elements. Lead
Lead
is a relatively unreactive post-transition metal. Its weak metallic character is illustrated by its amphoteric nature; lead and lead oxides react with acids and bases, and it tends to form covalent bonds. Compounds of lead
Compounds of lead
are usually found in the +2 oxidation state rather than the +4 state common with lighter members of the carbon group
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List Of Places In England
Here is a list of places, divided by ceremonial county of England.Northumberland Durham Lancashire Cheshire Derbs. Notts. Lincolnshire Leics. Staffs. Shropshire Warks. Northants. Norfolk Suffolk Essex Herts. Beds. Bucks. Oxon. Glos. Somerset Wiltshire Berkshire Kent Surrey Hampshire Dorset Devon Cornwall Heref. Worcs. Bristol East Riding of Yorkshire Rutland Cambs. Greater London Tyne & Wear Cumbria North Yorkshire South Yorks. West Yorkshire Greater Manc. Merseyside East Sussex West Sussex Isle of Wight West MidlandsSee also[edit]Toponymy of Great Britain Toponymical list of counties of the United Kingdom List of generic forms in British place names List of places in the United Kingdom Subdivisions of the United Kingdom List of places in Northern Ireland List of places in Scotland List of places in Wales List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Englandv t eList of places in EnglandBedfordshire Berkshire Bristol Buckinghamshire
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List Of Places In Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Derbyshire
(/ˈdɑːrbɪʃər, -ʃɪər/) is a county in the East Midlands of England. A substantial portion of the Peak District National Park lies within Derbyshire, containing the southern extremity of the Pennine range of hills which extend into the north of the county. The county contains part of the National Forest, and borders on Greater Manchester
Greater Manchester
to the northwest, West Yorkshire
West Yorkshire
to the north, South Yorkshire
South Yorkshire
to the northeast, Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
to the east, Leicestershire
Leicestershire
to the southeast, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
to the west and southwest and Cheshire
Cheshire
also to the west
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Staffordshire
Staffordshire
Staffordshire
(/ˈstæfərdʃɪər/ or /ˈstæfərdʃər/;[2] abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands of England. It adjoins Cheshire
Cheshire
to the north west, Derbyshire
Derbyshire
and Leicestershire
Leicestershire
to the east, Warwickshire
Warwickshire
to the south east, West Midlands and Worcestershire
Worcestershire
to the south, and Shropshire
Shropshire
to the west. Stone railway station
Stone railway station
in Stone.The largest city in Staffordshire
Staffordshire
is Stoke-on-Trent, which is administered separately from the rest of the county as an independent unitary authority. Lichfield
Lichfield
also has city status, although this is a considerably smaller cathedral city
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Census
A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations
United Nations
defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years
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Cheese
Cheese
Cheese
is a dairy product derived from milk that is produced in a wide range of flavors, textures, and forms by coagulation of the milk protein casein. It comprises proteins and fat from milk, usually the milk of cows, buffalo, goats, or sheep. During production, the milk is usually acidified, and adding the enzyme rennet causes coagulation. The solids are separated and pressed into final form.[1] Some cheeses have molds on the rind, the outer layer, or throughout. Most cheeses melt at cooking temperature. Hundreds of types of cheese from various countries are produced. Their styles, textures and flavors depend on the origin of the milk (including the animal's diet), whether they have been pasteurized, the butterfat content, the bacteria and mold, the processing, and aging. Herbs, spices, or wood smoke may be used as flavoring agents. The yellow to red color of many cheeses, such as Red Leicester, is produced by adding annatto
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Ironstone
Ironstone
Ironstone
is a sedimentary rock, either deposited directly as a ferruginous sediment or created by chemical replacement, that contains a substantial proportion of an iron compound from which iron either can be or once was smelted commercially. This term is customarily restricted to hard coarsely banded, nonbanded, and noncherty sedimentary rocks of post- Precambrian
Precambrian
age. The Precambrian
Precambrian
deposits, which have a different origin, are generally known as banded iron formations. The iron minerals comprising ironstones can consist either of oxides, i.e. limonite, hematite, and magnetite; carbonates, i.e. siderite; silicates, i.e
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Limestone
Limestone
Limestone
is a sedimentary rock, composed mainly of skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, forams and molluscs. Its major materials are the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). About 10% of sedimentary rocks are limestones. The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions of years
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Market (place)
A market, or marketplace, is a location where people regularly gather for the purchase and sale of provisions, livestock, and other goods.[1] In different parts of the world, a market place may be described as a souk (from the Arabic), bazaar (from the Persian), a fixed mercado (Spanish), or itinerant tianguis (Mexico), or palengke (Philippines). Some markets operate daily and are said to be permanent markets while others are held once a week or on less frequent specified days such as festival days and are said to be periodic markets. The form that a market adopts is depends on its locality's population, culture, ambient and geographic conditions. The term market covers many types of trading, as market squares, market halls and food halls, and their different varieties. Due to this, marketplaces can be situated both outdoors and indoors. Markets have existed for as long as humans have engaged in trade
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West Derbyshire (UK Parliament Constituency)
West Derbyshire
Derbyshire
was a county constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. From 1885 until it was replaced by the Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Dales constituency in the 2010 General Election, it elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post voting system
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Parish Church
A parish church (or parochial church) in Christianity
Christianity
is the church which acts as the religious centre of a parish. In many parts of the world, especially in rural areas, the parish church may play a significant role in community activities, often allowing its premises to be used for non-religious community events. The church building reflects this status, and there is considerable variety in the size and style of parish churches. Many villages in Europe
Europe
have churches that date back to the Middle Ages, but all periods of architecture are represented.Contents1 Role 2 By denomination 3 Protestant resurgence 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingRole[edit] In England, it is the basic administrative unit of episcopal churches. Nearly every part of England
England
is in a parish, and most parishes have an Anglican parish church, which is consecrated
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Saint Giles
Saint
Saint
Giles (/dʒaɪlz/, Latin: Aegidius; French: Gilles; c. 650 AD – c. 710), also known as Giles the Hermit, was a Greek,[2] Christian, hermit saint from Athens, whose legend is centered in Provence
Provence
and Septimania. Giles founded the abbey in Saint-Gilles-du-Gard
Saint-Gilles-du-Gard
whose tomb became a place of pilgrimage. It was a stop on the road that led from Arles
Arles
to Santiago de Compostela, the pilgrim Way of St. James. Giles is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers.Contents1 Life 2 Veneration 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksLife[edit] Giles first lived in retreats near the mouth of the Rhône
Rhône
and by the River Gard in Septimania, in today's southern France
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Neolithic
farming, animal husbandry pottery, metallurgy, wheel circular ditches, henges, megaliths Neolithic
Neolithic
religion↓ ChalcolithicThe Neolithic
Neolithic
(/ˌniːəˈlɪθɪk/ ( listen)[1]) was a period in the development of human technology, beginning about 10,200 BC, according to the ASPRO chronology, in some parts of the Middle East, and later in other parts of the world[2] and ending between 4500 and 2000 BC. Traditionally considered the last part of the Stone Age
Stone Age
or The New Stone Age, the Neolithic
Neolithic
followed the terminal Holocene
Holocene
Epipaleolithic period and commenced with the beginning of farming, which produced the " Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution"
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