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Harpsichord
A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard, a row of levers which the player presses. When the player presses one or more keys, a mechanism that plucks one or more strings with a small quill is triggered. "Harpsichord" designates the whole family of similar plucked-keyboard instruments, including the smaller virginals, muselar, and spinet. The harpsichord was widely used in Renaissance and Baroque music. During the late 18th century, it gradually disappeared from the musical scene, with the rise of the piano
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Jan Vermeer
Johannes Vermeer
Johannes Vermeer
(/vərˈmɪər/;[3] Dutch: [joːˈɦɑnəs vərˈmeːr]; October 1632 – December 1675) was a Dutch painter who specialized in domestic interior scenes of middle-class life. He was a moderately successful provincial genre painter in his lifetime but evidently was not wealthy, leaving his wife and children in debt at his death, perhaps because he produced relatively few paintings.[4] Vermeer worked slowly and with great care, and frequently used very expensive pigments. He is particularly renowned for his masterly treatment and use of light in his work.[5] Vermeer painted mostly domestic interior scenes
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Deutsches Museum
The Deutsches Museum
Deutsches Museum
(German Museum) in Munich, Germany, is the world's largest museum of science and technology, with about 28,000 exhibited objects from 50 fields of science and technology.[1] It receives about 1.5 million visitors per year. The museum was founded on 28 June 1903, at a meeting of the Association of German Engineers (VDI) as an initiative of Oskar von Miller. Its official name is Deutsches Museum
Deutsches Museum
von Meisterwerken der Naturwissenschaft und Technik (English: German Museum of Masterpieces of Science and Technology). It is the largest museum in Munich
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Spruce
About 35; see text.A spruce is a tree of the genus Picea
Picea
/paɪˈsiːə/,[1] a genus of about 35 species of coniferous evergreen trees in the family Pinaceae, found in the northern temperate and boreal (taiga) regions of the Earth. Spruces are large trees, from about 20–60 m (about 60–200 ft) tall when mature, and can be distinguished by their whorled branches and conical form. The needles, or leaves, of spruces are attached singly to the branches in a spiral fashion, each needle on a small, peg-like structure. The needles are shed when 4–10 years old, leaving the branches rough with the retained pegs (an easy means of distinguishing them from other similar genera, where the branches are fairly smooth). Spruces are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera (moth and butterfly) species, such as the eastern spruce budworm
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Lady Standing At A Virginal
Lady Standing at a Virginal
Virginal
is a genre painting created by the Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer
Johannes Vermeer
in about 1670–1672, now in the National Gallery, London.Contents1 Description 2 See also 3 Further reading 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] The oil painting depicts a richly dressed woman playing a virginal in a home with a tiled floor, paintings on the wall and some of the locally manufactured Delftware
Delftware
blue and white tiles of a type that appear in other Vermeer works.[2] The identities of the paintings on the wall are not certain, according to the National Gallery, but the landscape on the left may be by either Jan Wijnants
Jan Wijnants
or Allart van Everdingen. The second painting, showing Cupid
Cupid
holding a card, is attributed to Caesar van Everdingen, Allart's brother
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Octave
In music, an octave (Latin: octavus: eighth) or perfect octave is the interval between one musical pitch and another with half or double its frequency. It is defined by ANSI[2] as the unit of frequency level when the base of the logarithm is two. The octave relationship is a natural phenomenon that has been referred to as the "basic miracle of music", the use of which is "common in most musical systems".[3] The most important musical scales are typically written using eight notes, and the interval between the first and last notes is an octave. For example, the C major scale is typically written C D E F G A B C, the initial and final Cs being an octave apart
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Chladni
Ernst Florens Friedrich Chladni (German: [ˈɛʁnst ˈfloːʁɛns ˈfʁiːdʁɪç ˈkladnɪ]; 30 November 1756 – 3 April 1827) was a German physicist and musician. His most important work, for which he is sometimes labeled the father of acoustics, included research on vibrating plates and the calculation of the speed of sound for different gases.[1] He also undertook pioneering work in the study of meteorites and is regarded by some as the father of meteoritics.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Chladni figures 4 Musical instruments 5 Meteorites 6 Other work 7 Death 8 Bibliography 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksEarly life[edit] Although Chladni was born in Wittenberg
Wittenberg
in Saxony, his family originated from Kremnica, then part of the Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Hungary
and today a mining town in central Slovakia
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Celcon
Polyoxymethylene
Polyoxymethylene
(POM), also known as acetal,[2] polyacetal, and polyformaldehyde, is an engineering thermoplastic used in precision parts requiring high stiffness, low friction, and excellent dimensional stability. As with many other synthetic polymers, it is produced by different chemical firms with slightly different formulas and sold variously by such names as Delrin, Celcon, Ramtal, Duracon, Kepital, and Hostaform. POM is characterized by its high strength, hardness and rigidity to −40 °C. POM is intrinsically opaque white, due to its high crystalline composition, but it is available in all colors. POM has a density of 1.410–1.420 g/cm3.[3] Typical applications for injection-molded POM include high-performance engineering components such as small gear wheels, eyeglass frames, ball bearings, ski bindings, fasteners, guns, knife handles, and lock systems
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Delrin
Polyoxymethylene
Polyoxymethylene
(POM), also known as acetal,[2] polyacetal, and polyformaldehyde, is an engineering thermoplastic used in precision parts requiring high stiffness, low friction, and excellent dimensional stability. As with many other synthetic polymers, it is produced by different chemical firms with slightly different formulas and sold variously by such names as Delrin, Celcon, Ramtal, Duracon, Kepital, and Hostaform. POM is characterized by its high strength, hardness and rigidity to −40 °C. POM is intrinsically opaque white, due to its high crystalline composition, but it is available in all colors. POM has a density of 1.410–1.420 g/cm3.[3] Typical applications for injection-molded POM include high-performance engineering components such as small gear wheels, eyeglass frames, ball bearings, ski bindings, fasteners, guns, knife handles, and lock systems
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Transposition (music)
In music transposition refers to the process, or operation, of moving a collection of notes (pitches or pitch classes) up or down in pitch by a constant interval.The shifting of a melody, a harmonic progression or an entire musical piece to another key, while maintaining the same tone structure, i.e. the same succession of whole tones and semitones and remaining melodic intervals. — Musikalisches Lexicon, 879 (1865), Heinrich Christoph Koch (trans. Schuijer)[1]For example, one might transpose an entire piece of music into another key
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Museu De La Música De Barcelona
The Museu de la Música de Barcelona
Museu de la Música de Barcelona
(Catalan naming, English: Music Museum
Museum
of Barcelona) is a museum in Barcelona that houses a collection of musical instruments from around the world as well as biographical documents, from ancient civilisations to new technologies from the 21st century. The Museum
Museum
collection comprises 2000 instruments, 500 of which are on display, including one of the best guitar collections of the world.[1] The museum covers historical, conservational and research aspects and promotes the city’s musical heritage.[2] The Museu de la Música is administered by the City Council. Since 2007 its headquarters are found on the second floor of the L'Auditori de Barcelona in the Fort Pienc neighbourhood.[3] References[edit]^ "La mejor colección de guitarras del mundo, al alcance del gran público". La Vanguardia. 19 July 2013
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Harmonic
A harmonic is any member of the harmonic series, a divergent infinite series. Its name derives from the concept of overtones, or harmonics in musical instruments: the wavelengths of the overtones of a vibrating string or a column of air (as with a tuba) are derived from the string's (or air column's) fundamental wavelength. Every term of the series (i.e., the higher harmonics) after the first is the "harmonic mean" of the neighboring terms. The phrase "harmonic mean" likewise derives from music. The term is employed in various disciplines, including music, physics, acoustics, electronic power transmission, radio technology, and other fields. It is typically applied to repeating signals, such as sinusoidal waves. A harmonic of such a wave is a wave with a frequency that is a positive integer multiple of the frequency of the original wave, known as the fundamental frequency. The original wave is also called the 1st harmonic, the following harmonics are known as higher harmonics
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Munich
Munich
Munich
(/ˈmjuːnɪk/; German: München, pronounced [ˈmʏnçn̩] ( listen),[2] Austro-Bavarian: Minga [ˈmɪŋ(ː)ɐ]) is the capital and the most populated city in the German state of Bavaria, on the banks of the River Isar
Isar
north of the Bavarian Alps
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Bass (sound)
Bass describes tones of low (also called "deep") frequency, pitch and range from 16-256 Hz (C0 to middle C4). In musical compositions, such as songs and pieces, these are the lowest parts of the harmony. In choral music without instrumental accompaniment, the bass is supplied by adult male bass singers. In an orchestra, the basslines are played by the double bass and cellos, bassoon or contrabassoon, low brass such as the tuba and bass trombone, and the timpani (kettledrums). In many styles of traditional music such as Bluegrass, folk, and in styles such as Rockabilly
Rockabilly
and Big Band
Big Band
and Bebop
Bebop
jazz, the bass role is filled by the upright bass. In most rock and pop bands and in jazz fusion groups, the bass role is filled by the electric bass
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Clef
A clef (from French: clef "key") is a musical symbol used to indicate the pitch of written notes.[1] Placed on one of the lines at the beginning of the stave, it indicates the name and pitch of the notes on that line. This line serves as a reference point by which the names of the notes on any other line or space of the stave may be determined. Only one clef that references a note in a space rather than on a line has ever been used. There are three types of clef used in modern music notation: F, C, and G. Each type of clef assigns a different reference note to the line (and in rare cases, the space) on which it is placed
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Samuel Pepys
Samuel Pepys
Samuel Pepys
FRS (/piːps/ PEEPS;[1] 23 February 1633 – 26 May 1703) was an administrator of the navy of England and Member of Parliament who is most famous for the diary that he kept for a decade while still a relatively young man. Pepys had no maritime experience, but he rose to be the Chief Secretary to the Admiralty
Secretary to the Admiralty
under both King Charles II and King James II through patronage, hard work, and his talent for administration. His influence and reforms at the Admiralty
Admiralty
were important in the early professionalisation of the Royal Navy.[2] The detailed private diary that Pepys kept from 1660 until 1669 was first published in the 19th century and is one of the most important primary sources for the English Restoration
English Restoration
period
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