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Hardpoint
A hardpoint (more formally known as a station or weapon station) is a location on an airframe designed to carry an external or internal load. This includes a station on the wing or fuselage of a civilian aircraft or military aircraft where external jet engine, ordnance, countermeasures, gun pods, targeting pods or drop tanks can be mounted.Contents1 Aircraft 2 Pylon 3 Military3.1 Racks 3.2 Guided missile launchers 3.3 Rotary launcher 3.4 Bomb rack 3.5 Store release control 3.6 Example station designation4 See also 5 References 6 External linksAircraft[edit] DC-10
DC-10
engine pylonIn aeronautics, the term station is used to refer to a point of carriage on the frame of an aircraft. A station is usually rated to carry a certain amount of payload. It is a design number which already has taken the rated g-forces of the frame into account
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AGM-65
The AGM-65 Maverick is an air-to-surface missile (AGM) designed for close air support. It is the most widely produced precision-guided missile in the Western world,[4] and is effective against a wide range of tactical targets, including armor, air defenses, ships, ground transportation and fuel storage facilities. Originally designed and built by Raytheon Missile Systems, development of the AGM-65 spanned from 1966 to 1972, after which it entered service with the United States Air Force in August 1972. Since then, it has been exported to more than 30 countries and is certified on 25 aircraft.[5] The Maverick served during the Vietnam, Yom Kippur, Iran–Iraq, and Persian Gulf Wars, along with other smaller conflicts, destroying enemy forces and installations with varying degrees of success. Since its introduction into service, numerous Maverick versions had been designed and produced, using electro-optical, laser, charge-coupled device and infra-red guidance systems
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Boeing
The Boeing
Boeing
Company (/ˈboʊ.ɪŋ/) is an American multinational corporation that designs, manufactures, and sells airplanes, rotorcraft, rockets, and satellites worldwide. The company also provides leasing and product support services
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Chengdu J-20
The Chengdu
Chengdu
J-20 (simplified Chinese: 歼-20; traditional Chinese: 殲-20) is a single-seat, twinjet, all-weather, stealth fifth-generation fighter aircraft developed by China's Chengdu Aerospace Corporation for the People's Liberation Army
People's Liberation Army
Air Force (PLAAF).[11] The J-20 made its maiden flight on 11 January 2011, but the plane was officially revealed on China
China
International Aviation & Aerospace Exhibition in 2016
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MIL-STD-1760
MIL-STD-1760 Aircraft/Store Electrical Interconnection System defines a standardized electrical interface between a military aircraft and its carriage stores. Carriage stores range from weapons, such as GBU-31
GBU-31
JDAM, to pods, such as AN/AAQ-14
AN/AAQ-14
LANTIRN, to drop tanks. Prior to adoption and widespread use of MIL-STD-1760, new store types were added to aircraft using dissimilar, proprietary interfaces. This greatly complicated the aircraft equipment used to control and monitor the store while it was attached to the aircraft: the stores management system, or SMS. MIL-STD-1760 defines the electrical characteristics of the signals at the interface, as well as the connector and pin assignments of all of the signals used in the interface. The connectors are designed for quick and reliable release of the store from the aircraft
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Solenoid
A solenoid (/ˈsoʊ.lə.nɔɪd/)[1] (from the French solénoïde, derived in turn from the Greek solen ("pipe, channel") and eidos ("form, shape")[2]) is a coil wound into a tightly packed helix. The term was invented by French physicist André-Marie Ampère
André-Marie Ampère
to designate a helical coil.[3] In physics, the term refers to a coil whose length is substantially greater than its diameter, often wrapped around a metallic core, which produces a uniform magnetic field in a volume of space (where some experiment might be carried out) when an electric current is passed through it. A solenoid is a type of electromagnet when the purpose is to generate a controlled magnetic field. If the purpose of the solenoid is instead to impede changes in the electric current, a solenoid can be more specifically classified as an inductor rather than an electromagnet
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Zero Retention Force Arming Unit
The Zero Retention Force Arming Unit (ZRFAU) is an electro mechanical device used on military aircraft bomb racks to arm munitions as they are released from the aircraft. EDO MBM Technology Ltd are sole owners of the proprietary rights to the unit and act as technical support and design authority for its ongoing use and installation. The units are used in U.S
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Mark 82 Bomb
GBU-12
GBU-12
Paveway II GBU-38
GBU-38
JDAMSpecificationsWeight 500 pounds (227 kg)Length 87.4 inches (2.22 m)Diameter 10.75 inches (273 mm)Filling Tritonal, Minol (explosive) or Composition H6Filling weight 192 pounds (87 kg)The Mark 82 (Mk 82) is an unguided, low-drag general-purpose bomb, part of the United States Mark 80 series. The explosive filling is usually tritonal, though other compositions have sometimes been used.Contents1 Development and deployment 2 Low-level delivery 3 Variants 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDevelopment and deployment[edit]A B-2 Spirit
B-2 Spirit
dropping Mk 82 bombs into the Pacific Ocean in a 1994 training exercise off Point Mugu, California.With a nominal weight of 500 lb (227 kg), it is the one of the smallest in current service, and one of the most common air-dropped weapons in the world
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JDAM
The Joint Direct Attack Munition
Joint Direct Attack Munition
(JDAM) is a guidance kit that converts unguided bombs, or "dumb bombs", into all-weather "smart" munitions. JDAM-equipped bombs are guided by an integrated inertial guidance system coupled to a Global Positioning System
Global Positioning System
(GPS) receiver, giving them a published range of up to 15 nautical miles (28 km). JDAM-equipped bombs range from 500 pounds (227 kg) to 2,000 pounds (907 kg).[1] When installed on a bomb, the JDAM
JDAM
kit is given a GBU (Guided Bomb Unit) nomenclature, superseding the Mark 80 or BLU (Bomb, Live Unit) nomenclature of the bomb to which it is attached. The JDAM
JDAM
is not a stand-alone weapon; rather it is a "bolt-on" guidance package that converts unguided gravity bombs into precision-guided munitions (PGMs)
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AGM-78 Standard ARM
The AGM-78 Standard ARM
AGM-78 Standard ARM
was an anti-radiation missile developed by General Dynamics, United States.Contents1 Overview 2 Variants 3 Operators 4 External linksOverview[edit] Originally developed for the US Navy
US Navy
during the late 1960s, the AGM-78 was created in large part because of the limitations of the AGM-45 Shrike, which suffered from a small warhead, limited range and a poor guidance system. General Dynamics
General Dynamics
was asked to create an air-launched ARM by modifying the RIM-66 SM-1 surface-to-air missile. This use of an "off the shelf" design greatly reduced development costs, and trials of the new weapon begun in 1967 after only a year of development
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Anti-radiation Missile
An anti-radiation missile (ARM) is a missile designed to detect and home in on an enemy radio emission source.[1] Typically, these are designed for use against an enemy radar, although jammers[2] and even radios used for communications can also be targeted in this manner.Contents1 Air-to-surface 2 Surface-to-surface 3 Surface-to-air 4 Air-to-air 5 See also 6 ReferencesAir-to-surface[edit] Most ARM designs to date have been intended for use against ground-based radars. Commonly carried by specialist aircraft in the Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses
Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses
(SEAD) role (known to the United States Air Force as "Wild Weasels"), the primary purpose of this type of missile is to degrade enemy air defenses in the first period of a conflict in order to increase the chances of survival for the following waves of strike aircraft. They can also be used to quickly shut down unexpected surface-to-air missile (SAM) sites during an air raid
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AGM-45 Shrike
67.5 kg (149 lb) MK 5 MOD 1 (or MK 86 MOD 1) blast-fragmentation, or 66.6 kg (147 lb) WAU-9/B blast-fragmentationWingspan 3 feet (914 mm)Operational range16 km AGM-45A[3] , 40km AGM-45B[4][5]Speed Mach 1.5Guidance system Passive radar homingLaunch platformA-4 Skyhawk, A-6 Intruder, F-105 Thunderchief, F-4 Phantom II, Avro Vulcan (not regular service) AGM-45 Shrike
AGM-45 Shrike
is an American anti-radiation missile designed to home in on hostile anti-aircraft radar. The Shrike was developed by the Naval Weapons Center at China Lake in 1963 by mating a seeker head to the rocket body of an AIM-7 Sparrow. It was phased out by U.S
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Wild Weasel
Wild Weasel
Wild Weasel
is a code name given by the United States Armed Forces, specifically the US Air Force, to an aircraft, of any type, equipped with radar-seeking missiles and tasked with destroying the radars and SAM installations of enemy air defense systems.[1][2] "The first Wild Weasel success came soon after the first Wild Weasel
Wild Weasel
mission 20 December 1965 when Captains Al Lamb and Jack Donovan took out a site during a Rolling Thunder strike on the railyard at Yen Bai, some 75 miles northwest of Hanoi."[3] The Wild Weasel
Wild Weasel
concept was developed by the United States Air Force in 1965, after the introduction of Soviet SAM missiles and their downing of U.S
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Vietnam War
North Vietnamese victoryWithdrawal of American-led forces from Indochina Communist governments take power in South Vietnam, Cambodia
Cambodia
and Laos South Vietnam
South Vietnam
is annexed by North VietnamTerritorial changes Reunification of North and
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Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit
The Northrop (later Northrop Grumman) B-2 Spirit, also known as the Stealth Bomber, is an American heavy penetration strategic bomber, featuring low observable stealth technology designed for penetrating dense anti-aircraft defenses; it is a flying wing design with a crew of two.[1][4] The bomber can deploy both conventional and thermonuclear weapons, such as eighty 500 lb (230 kg)-class (Mk 82) JDAM Global Positioning System-guided bombs, or sixteen 2,400 lb (1,100 kg) B83 nuclear bombs. The B-2 is the only acknowledged aircraft that can carry large air-to-surface standoff weapons in a stealth configuration. Development started under the "Advanced Technology Bomber" (ATB) project during the Carter administration; its expected performance was one of his reasons for the cancellation of the supersonic B-1A bomber. The ATB project continued during the Reagan administration, but worries about delays in its introduction led to the reinstatement of the B-1 program
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