HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Hard-copy
In information handling, the U.S. Federal Standard 1037C (Glossary of Telecommunication Terms) defines a hard copy is a permanent reproduction, or copy, in the form of a physical object, of any media suitable for direct use by a person (in particular paper), of displayed or transmitted data. Examples of hard copy include teleprinter pages, continuous printed tapes, computer printouts, and radio photo prints. On the other hand, physical objects such as magnetic tapes diskettes, or non-printed punched paper tapes are not defined as hard copy by 1037C.[1] A file which can be viewed on a screen without printing it out is sometimes called a soft copy.[2][3] The U.S. Federal Standard 1037C defines "soft copy" as "a nonpermanent display image, for example, a cathode ray tube display."[4] The term "hard copy" predates the age of the digital computer
[...More...]

"Hard-copy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Hard Copy
In information handling, the U.S. Federal Standard 1037C (Glossary of Telecommunication Terms) defines a hard copy is a permanent reproduction, or copy, in the form of a physical object, of any media suitable for direct use by a person (in particular paper), of displayed or transmitted data. Examples of hard copy include teleprinter pages, continuous printed tapes, computer printouts, and radio photo prints. On the other hand, physical objects such as magnetic tapes diskettes, or non-printed punched paper tapes are not defined as hard copy by 1037C.[1] A file which can be viewed on a screen without printing it out is sometimes called a soft copy.[2][3] The U.S. Federal Standard 1037C defines "soft copy" as "a nonpermanent display image, for example, a cathode ray tube display."[4] The term "hard copy" predates the age of the digital computer
[...More...]

"Hard Copy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

On-line
In computer technology and telecommunications, online indicates a state of connectivity, and offline indicates a disconnected state, specifically an internet connection. Online and offline are defined by Standard 1037C.[citation needed] They are states or conditions of a "device or equipment" or of a "functional unit"
[...More...]

"On-line" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

MIL-STD-188
MIL-STD-188
MIL-STD-188
is a series of U.S. military standards relating to telecommunications.Contents1 Purpose 2 Evolution 3 Deviations and waivers 4 Relation to other systems of standards 5 Current development emphasis 6 Documents6.1 MIL-STD-188-100 series 6.2 MIL-STD-188-200 series 6.3 MIL-STD-188-300 series7 See also 8 References 9 External linksPurpose[edit] Faced with "past technical deficiencies in telecommunications systems and equipment and software…that were traced to basic inadequacies in the application of telecommunication standards and to the lack of a well defined…program for their review, control and implementation", the U.S. Department of Defense looked to develop a series of standards that would alleviate the problem.[1] By 1988, the U.S
[...More...]

"MIL-STD-188" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

General Services Administration
The General Services Administration
General Services Administration
(GSA), an independent agency of the United States government, was established in 1949 to help manage and support the basic functioning of federal agencies. GSA supplies products and communications for U.S. government offices, provides transportation and office space to federal employees, and develops government-wide cost-minimizing policies and other management tasks.[3] GSA employs about 12,000 federal workers and has an annual operating budget of roughly $26.3 billion. GSA oversees $66 billion of procurement annually. It contributes to the management of about $500 billion in U.S. federal property, divided chiefly among 8,300 owned and leased buildings and a 210,000 vehicle motor pool
[...More...]

"General Services Administration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Copyright Status Of Work By The U.S. Government
A work of the United States
United States
government, as defined by the United States copyright law, is "a work prepared by an officer or employee" of the federal government "as part of that person's official duties."[1] In general, under section 105 of the Copyright Act,[2] such works are not entitled to domestic copyright protection under U.S. law and are therefore in the public domain. This act only applies to U.S. domestic copyright as that is the extent of U.S. federal law. The U.S. government asserts that it can still hold the copyright to those works in other countries.[3][4] Publication of an otherwise protected work by the U.S. government does not put that work in the public domain. For example, government publications may include works copyrighted by a contractor or grantee; copyrighted material assigned to the U.S
[...More...]

"Copyright Status Of Work By The U.S. Government" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jeff Randall
Jeffrey "Jeff" Randall is a fictional character played by Mike Pratt in the original private detective series, Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) from 1969 to 1971 and by Bob Mortimer
Bob Mortimer
in the BBC
BBC
remake. He is the only man in the world (with the exception of the occasional psychic) who can see and hear the ghost of his deceased partner Marty Hopkirk. Original Series[edit] The role was written for ATV contract artist Dave Allen but it ended up being played by Mike Pratt.[1] Randall is a successful private detective whose success in solving mysteries becomes inevitably greater once he has the benefits and paranormal abilities of his deceased friend and partner Marty Hopkirk, who was murdered during an investigation. Randall is quick and agile, but often shows a distinct lack of physical strength and stamina
[...More...]

"Jeff Randall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
is a British daily newspaper. It was known from 1821 until 1959 as the Manchester
Manchester
Guardian. Along with its sister papers The Observer and the Guardian Weekly, The Guardian
The Guardian
is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust
[...More...]

"The Guardian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Web Page
A web page (also written as webpage) is a document that is suitable for the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and web browsers. A web browser displays a web page on a monitor or mobile device. The web page usually means what is visible, but the term may also refer to a computer file, usually written in HTML
HTML
or a comparable markup language. Web browsers coordinate various web resource elements for the written web page, such as style sheets, scripts, and images, to present the web page. Typical web pages provide hypertext that includes a navigation bar or a sidebar menu linking to other web pages via hyperlinks, often referred to as links. On a network, a web browser can retrieve a web page from a remote web server. The web server may restrict access to a private network such as a corporate intranet
[...More...]

"Web Page" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Unix
Unix
Unix
(/ˈjuːnɪks/; trademarked as UNIX) is a family of multitasking, multiuser computer operating systems that derive from the original AT&T Unix, development starting in the 1970s at the Bell Labs research center by Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and others.[3] Initially intended for use inside the Bell System, AT&T licensed Unix
Unix
to outside parties in the late 1970s, leading to a variety of both academic and commercial Unix
Unix
variants from vendors like the University of California, Berkeley
University of California, Berkeley
(BSD), Microsoft
Microsoft
(Xenix), IBM (AIX), and Sun Microsystems
Sun Microsystems
(Solaris)
[...More...]

"Unix" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Grep
grep is a command-line utility for searching plain-text data sets for lines that match a regular expression
[...More...]

"Grep" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Dysphemism
A dysphemism is an expression with connotations that are offensive either about the subject matter or to the audience, or both. Dysphemisms contrast with neutral or euphemistic expressions.[1] Dysphemism is sometimes motivated by feelings such as fear, distaste, hatred, and contempt. Worded simply, a dysphemism is a derogatory or unpleasant term used instead of a pleasant or neutral one, such as "loony bin" for "mental hospital".Contents1 Etymology 2 Usage 3 Types3.1 Synecdoche 3.2 Dysphemistic epithets 3.3 Name dysphemism 3.4 Cross-cultural dysphemism4 Context and drift4.1 Move from euphemism to dysphemism 4.2 Reclamation of dysphemisms5 Taboo
Taboo
terms 6 See also 7 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word dysphemism comes from the Greek dys δύς "mis-" and pheme φήμη "speech, voice, reputation"
[...More...]

"Dysphemism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Information Revolution
The term information revolution describes current economic, social and technological trends beyond the Industrial Revolution. Many competing terms have been proposed that focus on different aspects of this societal development. The British polymath crystallographer J. D. Bernal
J. D. Bernal
introduced the term "scientific and technical revolution" in his 1939 book The Social Function of Science to describe the new role that science and technology are coming to play within society. He asserted that science is becoming a "productive force", using the Marxist Theory of Productive Forces.[1] After some controversy, the term was taken up by authors and institutions of the then-Soviet Bloc. Their aim was to show that socialism was a safe home for the scientific and technical ("technological" for some authors) revolution, referred to by the acronym STR
[...More...]

"Information Revolution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Printout (magazine)
Computing Today
Computing Today
was a computer magazine published by Argus Specialist Publications, it was printed in the UK from the late 1970s to the mid-1980s. It began life as a supplement to Electronics Today International for four issues and became an independent publication in March 1979. Some time after 1982 it bought out rival computing magazine Microcomputer Printout (formerly Printout) and the two magazines merged into one.[1] It gave computer hardware and software reviews, programming tutorials and program listings for many of the popular home computers of the time. UK subscription cost 10 pounds 50 pence including postage circa 1981. References[edit]^ Early UK Computer MagazinesThis European computer magazine or journal-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee tips for writing articles about magazines
[...More...]

"Printout (magazine)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Typesetting
Typesetting
Typesetting
is the composition of text by means of arranging physical types[1] or the digital equivalents. Stored letters and other symbols (called sorts in mechanical systems and glyphs in digital systems) are retrieved and ordered according to a language's orthography for visual display. Typesetting
Typesetting
requires one or more fonts (which are widely but erroneously confused with and substituted for typefaces)
[...More...]

"Typesetting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.