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Happy Ending
A happy ending is an ending of the plot of a work of fiction in which almost everything turns out for the best for the protagonists, their sidekicks, and almost everyone except the villains. In storylines where the protagonists are in physical danger, a happy ending mainly consists of their survival and successful completion of the quest or mission; where there is no physical danger, a happy ending may be lovers consummating their love despite various factors which may have thwarted it. A considerable number of storylines combine both situations. In Steven Spielberg's version of "War of the Worlds", the happy ending consists of three distinct elements: The protagonists all survive the countless perils of their journey; humanity as a whole survives the alien invasion; and the protagonist father regains the respect of his estranged children
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C. S. Forester
Cecil Louis Troughton Smith (27 August 1899 – 2 April 1966), known by his pen name Cecil Scott "C. S." Forester, was an English novelist known for writing tales of naval warfare such as the 12-book Horatio Hornblower series, depicting a Royal Navy
Royal Navy
officer during the Napoleonic wars. Two of the Hornblower books, A Ship of the Line
A Ship of the Line
and Flying Colours, were jointly awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction in 1938. His other works include The African Queen (1935; filmed in 1951 by John Huston).Contents1 Early years 2 Second World War 3 Literary career 4 Personal life 5 Bibliography5.1 Horatio Hornblower5.1.1 Omnibus5.2 Other Novels 5.3 Posthumous 5.4 Collections 5.5 Plays in 3 Acts. John Lane. 5.6 Non-Fiction6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEarly years[edit]This section does not cite any sources
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Othello
Othello
Othello
(The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice) is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1603. It is based on the story Un Capitano Moro ("A Moorish
Moorish
Captain") by Cinthio, a disciple of Boccaccio, first published in 1565.[1] The story revolves around its two central characters: Othello, a Moorish
Moorish
general in the Venetian army and his unfaithful ensign, Iago
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Plot (narrative)
Plot refers to the sequence of events inside a story which affect other events through the principle of cause and effect. The causal events of a plot can be thought of as a series of sentences linked by "and so". Plots can vary from simple structures such as in a traditional ballad to complex interwoven structures sometimes referred to as an imbroglio. The term plot can serve as a verb and refer to a character planning future actions in the story. In the narrative sense, the term highlights the important points which have important consequences within the story, according to Ansen Dibell.[1] The term is similar in meaning to the term storyline.[2][3]Contents1 Definition1.1 Fabula and syuzhet2 Structure 3 Aristotle 4 Freytag4.1 Exposition 4.2 Rising action 4.3 Climax 4.4 Falling action 4.5 Denouement5 Plot devices 6 Plot outline 7 A-Plot 8 Plot Summary 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External linksDefinition[edit] English novelist E. M
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Macbeth
Macbeth
Macbeth
(/məkˈbɛθ/; full title The Tragedy of Macbeth) is a tragedy by William Shakespeare; it is thought to have been first performed in 1606.[a] It dramatises the damaging physical and psychological effects of political ambition on those who seek power for its own sake. Of all the plays that Shakespeare
Shakespeare
wrote during the reign of James I, who was patron of Shakespeare's acting company, Macbeth
Macbeth
most clearly reflects the playwright's relationship with his sovereign.[1] It was first published in the Folio of 1623, possibly from a prompt book, and is Shakespeare's shortest tragedy.[2] A brave Scottish general named Macbeth
Macbeth
receives a prophecy from a trio of witches that one day he will become King of Scotland
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Oedipus Rex
Oedipus
Oedipus
Rex, also known by its Greek title, Oedipus
Oedipus
Tyrannus (Ancient Greek: Οἰδίπους Τύραννος IPA: [oidípuːs týranːos]), or Oedipus
Oedipus
the King, is an Athenian tragedy by Sophocles that was first performed around 429 BC.[1] Originally, to the ancient Greeks, the title was simply Oedipus
Oedipus
(Οἰδίπους), as it is referred to by Aristotle
Aristotle
in the Poetics. It is thought to have been renamed Oedipus
Oedipus
Tyrannus to distinguish it from Oedipus
Oedipus
at Colonus. In antiquity, the term “tyrant” referred to a ruler, but it did not necessarily have a negative connotation.[2][3][4] Of his three Theban plays that have survived, and that deal with the story of Oedipus, Oedipus
Oedipus
Rex was the second to be written
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William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
Shakespeare
(/ˈʃeɪkspɪər/; 26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616)[a] was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.[2][3][4] He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon".[5][b] His extant works, including collaborations, consist of approximately 39 plays,[c] 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.[7] Shakespeare
Shakespeare
was born and brought up in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna and twins Hamnet and Judith
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David Garrick
David Garrick
David Garrick
(19 February 1717 – 20 January 1779) was an English actor, playwright, theatre manager and producer who influenced nearly all aspects of theatrical practice throughout the 18th century, and was a pupil and friend of Dr Samuel Johnson. He appeared in a number of amateur theatricals, and with his appearance in the title role of Shakespeare's Richard III, audiences and managers began to take notice. Impressed by his portrayals of Richard III and a number of other roles, Charles Fleetwood engaged Garrick for a season at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane. He remained with the Drury Lane
Drury Lane
company for the next five years and purchased a share of the theatre with James Lacy. This purchase inaugurated 29 years of Garrick's management of the Drury Lane, during which time it rose to prominence as one of the leading theatres in Europe
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William Macready
William Charles Macready (3 March 1793 – 27 April 1873) was an English actor.Contents1 Life 2 Evaluation 3 Relatives 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further readingLife[edit] He was born in London
London
the son of William Macready
William Macready
the elder, and the actress Christina Ann Birch. Educated at Rugby School, it was his initial intention to go to University of Oxford, but in 1809 financial problems experienced by his father, the lessee of several provincial theatres, called him to share the responsibilities of theatrical management. On 7 June 1810 he made a successful first appearance as Romeo at Birmingham. Other Shakespearian parts followed, but a serious rupture between father and son resulted in the young man's departure for Bath in 1814
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Helena Faucit
Helena Saville Faucit, Lady Martin (11 October 1817 – 31 October 1898) was an English actress.Contents1 Early life 2 Early career 3 Career with Macready 4 After Macready 5 Career after marriage 6 References 7 Further readingEarly life[edit] Born in London, she was the daughter of actors John Saville Faucit and Harriet Elizabeth Savill. Her parents separated when she was a girl, and her mother went to live with William Farren in 1825.[1] With her elder sister Harriet, she was trained for the stage by her step-uncle, Percy Farren. She debuted as Juliet at a small theatre in Richmond in 1833. Her performance was praised by critics of The Athenaeum, but Farren delayed her professional debut to give her further training. Early career[edit] Faucit's first professional appearance was made on 5 January 1836 at Covent Garden as Julia in James Sheridan Knowles's The Hunchback
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Romeo And Juliet
Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet
Juliet
is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Today, the title characters are regarded as archetypal young lovers. Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet
Juliet
belongs to a tradition of tragic romances stretching back to antiquity. The plot is based on an Italian tale translated into verse as The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet
The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet
by Arthur Brooke in 1562 and retold in prose in Palace of Pleasure
Palace of Pleasure
by William Painter in 1567
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Shylock
Shylock
Shylock
is a character in William Shakespeare's play The Merchant of Venice. A Venetian Jewish
Jewish
moneylender, Shylock
Shylock
is the play's principal antagonist. His defeat and conversion to Christianity form the climax of the story.Contents1 Name 2 In the play 3 Historical background 4 Portrayal4.1 Shylock
Shylock
on stage5 Other representations5.1 Notable portrayals6 Shylock
Shylock
and antisemitism6.1 Anti-semitic reading 6.2 Sympathetic reading 6.3 Influence on antisemitism7 References 8 Bibliography 9 Further readingName Shylock
Shylock
is not a Jewish
Jewish
name. However, some scholars believe it probably derives from the biblical name Shalah, which is שלח (Shelach) in Hebrew
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Cancer
Cancer
Cancer
is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body.[2][8] These contrast with benign tumors, which do not spread to other parts of the body.[8] Possible signs and symptoms include a lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss, and a change in bowel movements.[1] While these symptoms may indicate cancer, they may have other causes.[1] Over 100 types of cancers affect humans.[8] Tobacco
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Epistle To The Romans
The Epistle
Epistle
to the Romans or Letter to the Romans, often shortened to Romans, is the sixth book in the New Testament. Biblical scholars agree that it was composed by the Apostle Paul
Apostle Paul
to explain that salvation is offered through the gospel of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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The Times
The Times
The Times
is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England. It began in 1785 under the title The Daily Universal Register, adopting its current name on 1 January 1788. The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
(founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers, since 1981 a subsidiary of News UK, itself wholly owned by News Corp
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The Spy Who Came In From The Cold
The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a 1963 Cold War spy novel by the British author John le Carré. It depicts Alec Leamas, a British agent, being sent to East Germany as a faux defector to sow disinformation about a powerful East German intelligence officer. The Spy Who Came in from the Cold portrays Western espionage methods as morally inconsistent with Western democracy and values
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