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Hanbok
Hanbok
Hanbok
(South Korea) or Joseon-ot (North Korea) is the representative example of traditional Korean dress. It is characterized by vibrant colors and simple lines without pockets. Although the term literally means "Korean clothing", hanbok usually refers specifically to clothing of the Joseon
Joseon
period and is worn as semi-formal or formal wear during traditional festivals and celebrations
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Goryeo
Gaegyeong (919–1232, 1270–1390, 1391-1392) Ganghwa (1232–1270) Namgyeong (1390-1391)Languages Middle KoreanReligion Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shamanism (Sindo)Government MonarchyKing •  918–943 Taejo (first) •  949–975 Gwangjong •  981–997 Seongjong •  1046–1083 Munjong •  1351–1374 Gongmin •  1389–1392 Gongyang (last)Military regime leader •  1170-1174 Yi Ui-bang (first) •  1174–1179 Jeong Jung-bu •  1196–1219 Choe Chung-heon •  1270 Im Yu-mu (last)History • 
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Kaesong
Kaesong
Kaesong
or Gaeseong[a] (Korean pronunciation: [kɛ.sʌŋ]) is a city in North Hwanghae Province
North Hwanghae Province
in the southern part of North Korea, a former Directly Governed City, and the capital of Korea
Korea
during the Taebong
Taebong
kingdom and subsequent Goryeo
Goryeo
dynasty. The city is near the Kaesong Industrial Region
Kaesong Industrial Region
close to the border with South Korea
Korea
and contains the remains of the Manwoldae
Manwoldae
palace. Called Songdo while it was the ancient capital of Goryeo, the city prospered as a trade centre that produced Korean ginseng. Kaesong
Kaesong
now functions as the DPRK's light industry centre. During the Japanese occupation from 1910 to 1945, the city was known by the Japanese pronunciation of its name, "Kaijō"
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Hanja
Hanja
Hanja
(Hangul: 한자; Hanja: 漢字; Korean pronunciation: [ha(ː)nt͈ɕa]) is the Korean name
Korean name
for Chinese characters (Chinese: 漢字; pinyin: hànzì).[1] More specifically, it refers to those Chinese characters
Chinese characters
borrowed from Chinese and incorporated into the Korean language
Korean language
with Korean pronunciation. Hanja-mal or Hanja-eo (the latter is more used) refers to words that can be written with Hanja, and hanmun (한문, 漢文) refers to Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
writing, although "Hanja" is sometimes used loosely to encompass these other concepts. Because Hanja
Hanja
never underwent major reform, they are almost entirely identical to traditional Chinese and kyūjitai characters, though the stroke orders for some characters are slightly different
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Tang Dynasty
The Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
or the Tang Empire
Empire
(/tɑːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 唐朝[a]) was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty
Sui dynasty
and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. It is generally regarded as a high point in Chinese civilization, and a golden age of cosmopolitan culture.[5] Its territory, acquired through the military campaigns of its early rulers, rivaled that of the Han dynasty, and the Tang capital at Chang'an
Chang'an
(present-day Xi'an) was the most populous city in the world. The dynasty was founded by the Lǐ family (李), who seized power during the decline and collapse of the Sui Empire
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Unified Silla
Later Silla
Silla
(668–935, Hangul: 후신라; Hanja: 後新羅; RR: Husilla, Korean pronunciation: [huː.ɕil.la]) or Unified Silla
Silla
(Hangul: 통일신라; Hanja: 統一新羅, Korean pronunciation: [tʰoːŋ.il.ɕil.la]) is the name often applied to the Korean kingdom of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, after it conquered Baekje
Baekje
and Goguryeo
Goguryeo
in the 7th century, unifying the central and southern regions of the Korean peninsula. Later Silla
Silla
was a prosperous and wealthy country,[2] and its metropolitan capital of Seorabeol
Seorabeol
(modern name Gyeongju)[3] was the fourth-largest city in the world at the time.[4][5][6][7] During its heyday, the country contested with Balhae, a Goguryeo–Mohe kingdom, to the north for supremacy in the region
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Manchu People
The Manchu[note 1] (Manchu: ᠮᠠᠨᠵᡠ; Möllendorff: manju; Abkai: manju; simplified Chinese: 满族; traditional Chinese: 滿族; pinyin: Mǎnzú; Wade–Giles: Man3-tsu2) are an ethnic minority in China
China
and the people from whom Manchuria
Manchuria
derives its
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Heungseon Daewongun
Heungseon Daewongun
Heungseon Daewongun
(흥선대원군, 興宣大院君, 21 December 1820 – 22 February 1898), also known as the Daewongun (대원군, 大院君), Guktaegong (국태공, 國太公, "The Great Archduke") or formally Heungseon Heonui Daewonwang (흥선헌의대원왕, 興宣獻懿大院王) and also known to contemporary western diplomats as Prince Gung, was the title of Yi Ha-eung, regent of Joseon
Joseon
during the minority of Emperor Gojong in the 1860s and until his death a key political figure of late Joseon
Joseon
Korea. Daewongun literally translates as "prince of the great court", a title customarily granted to the father of the reigning monarch when that father did not reign himself (usually because his son had been adopted as heir of a relative who did reign)
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Gojong Of Korea
Gojong (Hangul: 고종; Hanja: 高宗; RR: Gojong; MR: Kojong), the Emperor Gwangmu (Hangul: 광무제; Hanja: 光武帝; RR: Gwangmuje; MR: Kwangmuje; 8 September 1852 – 21 January 1919), was the twenty-sixth king of the Joseon
Joseon
dynasty and the first Emperor of Korea.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early Reign 1.2 External Pressures and Unequal Treaties 1.3 Imo Rebellion and Gapsin Coup 1.4 Peasant Revolts 1.5 Assassination of Queen Min 1.6 Anti-Japanese Sentiments in Korea 1.7 Korea Royal Refuge at the Russian Legation 1.8 Proclamation of Empire1.8.1 Emperor of Korea 1.8.2 After Abdication2 Family 3 Titles 4 Honours 5 His Era Name5.1 During the Joseon
Joseon
Dynasty 5.2 During the Korean Empire6 His Full Posthumous Name 7 Ancestry 8 Popular culture 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksBiography[edit] Early Reign[edit]King Gojong (later Emperor Gwangmu) in 1884
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Tianjin
Tianjin
Tianjin
([tʰjɛ́n.tɕín] ( listen)), formerly known in English as Tientsin, is a metropolis in northern coastal Mainland China
China
and one of the four national central cities of the country, with a total population of 15,469,500, and is also the world's 6th-most populous city proper.[3] It is governed as one of the four direct-controlled municipalities of the PRC and is thus under direct administration of the central government. Tianjin
Tianjin
borders Hebei Province and Beijing
Beijing
Municipality, bounded to the east by the Bohai Gulf portion of the Yellow Sea. Part of the Bohai Economic Rim, it is the largest coastal city in northern China. In terms of urban population, Tianjin
Tianjin
is the fourth largest in China, after Shanghai, Beijing, and Guangzhou
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Headgear
Headgear, headwear or headdress is the name given to any element of clothing which is worn on one's head. Headgears serve a variety of purposes:protection (against impact, cold, heat, rain and other precipitation, glare, sunburn, sunstroke, dust, contaminants, etc.) to keep hair contained or tidy decoration or fashion religious purposes medical purposes modesty; social convention distinction; a badge of office sport uniformContents1 Overview of headgear types1.1 Bonnets 1.2 Caps 1.3 Crowns 1.4 Fillets 1.5 Hair
Hair
covers 1.6 Hats 1.7 Helmets 1.8 Hoods 1.9 Masks 1.10
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Robe
A robe is a loose-fitting outer garment.[1][2] Unlike garments described as capes or cloaks, robes usually have sleeves
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Bokgeon
Fujin (Hanzi: 幅巾) is a type of guanmao (冠帽), a Chinese men’s traditional headgear made from a black fabric. It was usually worn with Shenyi
Shenyi
in Ming Dynasty
Ming Dynasty
and Joseon
Joseon
period of Korea. See also[edit]Hanfu ShenyiExternal links[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Bokgeon.This China-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis fashion-related article is a stub
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Scythians
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe
Steppe
culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasus
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Xiongnu
The Xiongnu
Xiongnu
(Chinese: 匈奴; Wade–Giles: Hsiung-nu) were a confederation[3] of nomadic peoples who, according to ancient Chinese sources, inhabited the eastern Asian Steppe
Asian Steppe
from the 3rd century BC to the late 1st century AD. Chinese sources report that Modu Chanyu, the supreme leader after 209 BC, founded the Xiongnu
Xiongnu
Empire.[4] After their previous overlords, the Yuezhi, migrated into Central Asia during the 2nd century BC, the Xiongnu
Xiongnu
became a dominant power on the steppes of north-east Central Asia, centred on an area known later as Mongolia. The Xiongnu
Xiongnu
were also active in areas now part of Siberia, Inner Mongolia, Gansu
Gansu
and Xinjiang
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Nomad
A nomad (Greek: νομάς, nomas, plural tribe) is a member of a community of people who live in different locations, moving from one place to another in search of grasslands for their animals.[2] Among the various ways nomads relate to their environment, one can distinguish the hunter-gatherer, the pastoral nomad owning livestock, or the "modern" peripatetic nomad. As of 1995, there were an estimated 30–40 million nomads in the world.[3] Nomadic hunting and gathering, following seasonally available wild plants and game, is by far the oldest human subsistence method.[citation needed] Pastoralists raise herds, driving them, or moving with them, in patterns that normally avoid depleting pastures beyond their ability to recover.[citation needed] Nomadism is also a lifestyle adapted to infertile regions such as steppe, tundra, or ice and sand, where mobility is the most efficient strategy for exploiting scarce resources
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