HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Han River (Hanshui)
The Han River, also known by its Chinese names Hanshui
Hanshui
and Han Jiang, is a left tributary of the Yangtze
Yangtze
in central China. It has a length of 1,532 kilometers (952 mi) and is the longest tributary of the Yangtze
Yangtze
system. The river gave its name to the Han dynasty
Han dynasty
and, through it, to the Han Chinese, the dominant ethnicity in China
China
and the most populous ethnic group in the world
[...More...]

"Han River (Hanshui)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bailong River
The Bailong River
Bailong River
(simplified Chinese: 白龙江; traditional Chinese: 白龍江; pinyin: Báilóng Jiāng; literally: "White Dragon River") is a river 576km long river in the Yangtze River
Yangtze River
basin. From its source to confluence with the Jialing River, the Bailong is actually longer and is thus the main stem of the Jialing River
Jialing River
system. The scenic Jiuzhaigou
Jiuzhaigou
reserve is found along one of the Bailong's tributaries.Contents1 History 2 Course 3 Notes 4 See alsoHistory[edit] In August 2010, heavy rains triggered a mudslide that dammed the river in Zhugqu
Zhugqu
County, Gansu, causing extensive damage and killing over a thousand people.[1][2] Course[edit] The Bailong River, in name, rises in Gansu's Luqu County, just west of the town of Langmusi
[...More...]

"Bailong River" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pearl River (China)
Coordinates: 22°46′N 113°38′E / 22.767°N 113.633°E / 22.767; 113.633Pearl River
River
(珠江)Zhū JiāngPearl River
River
in
[...More...]

"Pearl River (China)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Daba Mountains
The Daba Mountains, also known by their Chinese name as the Dabashan,[a] are a mountain range in Central China between the watersheds of the Yellow and Yangtze
Yangtze
Rivers. Part of the larger Qinling
Qinling
mountain range, it cuts through four provinces: Sichuan, Chongqing, Shaanxi, and Hubei. It is about 1,000 kilometers (620 mi) long.Contents1 Geography 2 Natural environment 3 Land use 4 Notes 5 ReferencesGeography[edit] The Daba Mountains
Daba Mountains
run in the general west-northwest to east-southeast direction, along the border between, on the one side (southwest and south) Sichuan
Sichuan
and Chongqing, and on the other side (northeast and north) Shaanxi
Shaanxi
and Hubei
[...More...]

"Daba Mountains" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Wuchang District
Wuchang forms part of the urban core of and is one of 13 districts of Wuhan, the capital of Hubei
Hubei
Province, China. It is the oldest of the three cities that merged into modern-day Wuhan, and stood on the right (southeastern) bank of the Yangtze
Yangtze
River, opposite the mouth of the Han River. The two other cities, Hanyang and Hankou, were on the left (northwestern) bank, separated from each other by the Han. The name "Wuchang" remains in common use for the part of urban Wuhan south of the Yangtze
Yangtze
River. Administratively, however, it is split between several districts of the City of Wuhan. The historic center of Wuchang lies within the modern Wuchang District, which has an area of 82.4 square kilometres (31.8 sq mi) and a population of 1,003,400.[4] Other parts of what is colloquially known as Wuchang are within Hongshan District (south and south-east) and Qingshan District (north-east)
[...More...]

"Wuchang District" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hanyang District
Hanyang District
Hanyang District
(simplified Chinese: 汉阳区; traditional Chinese: 漢陽區; pinyin: Hànyáng Qū) forms part of the urban core of and is one of 13 districts of Wuhan, the capital of Hubei
Hubei
province, People's Republic of China. Currently, it is a district and stands between the Han River (right/southern bank) and the Yangtze River (left/northwestern bank), where the former drains into the latter. It is connected by bridges with its former sister cities, Hankou and Wuchang
[...More...]

"Hanyang District" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jianghan Plain
Jianghan Plain
Jianghan Plain
(Chinese: 江汉平原), named for the confluence of the Yangtze ('Jiang') and Han ('han') rivers, is an alluvial plain located in the middle and south of Hubei, China. Wuhan, the most populous city in Central China,[1] is located on the plain. It shares the border with Dongtinghu Plain. It has an area of more than 30 thousands square kilometers. The region was once a large wetland, but was gradually colonized by settlers beginning in the Neolithic period.[2] This accelerated when the state of Chu established its capital there in the middle of the 1st millennium BC, and when the Qin and Han states built dikes to protect farmland from seasonal floods.[3] The Jianghan area has been an important food grain region of China
China
since at least the Ming Dynasty.[4] References[edit]^ "Focus on Wuhan, China"
[...More...]

"Jianghan Plain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Danjiangkou Reservoir
Danjiangkou
Danjiangkou
Reservoir(simplified Chinese: 丹江口水库; traditional Chinese: 丹江口水庫; pinyin: Dānjiāngkǒu Shuǐkù) is a multi-purpose reservoir in Xichuan County, Henan
Henan
and Danjiangkou
Danjiangkou
City, Hubei
Hubei
province, Central China. Created by the Danjiangkou
Danjiangkou
Dam, it serves as a supply of water for the region as well as irrigation, electricity generation and flood control
[...More...]

"Danjiangkou Reservoir" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Northern And Southern China
Northern China and southern China[a] are two approximate regions within China. The exact boundary between these two regions are not precisely defined. Nevertheless, the self-perception of Chinese people, especially regional stereotypes, has often been dominated by these two concepts, given that regional differences in culture and language have historically fostered strong regional identities (simplified Chinese: 乡土; traditional Chinese: 鄉土; pinyin: xiāngtǔ; literally: "localism") of the Chinese people.[1]Contents1 Extent 2 History 3 Today 4 Stereotypes and differences 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References7.1 Citations 7.2 Sources8 Further readingExtent[edit] Often used as the geographical dividing line between northern and southern China is the Huai River– Qin Mountains
Qin Mountains
Line
[...More...]

"Northern And Southern China" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Xihan River
The Xihan or Western Han River (Chinese: trad. 西漢水, simp. 西汉水, Xīhànshuǐ) is a northern tributary of the Jialing River, itself a tributary of the Yangtze. Within China, it is also known as the "Rhinoceros River" (犀牛江, Xīniújiāng). The "Western" in its name distinguishes this river from the Han River, today known in Chinese as the Hanjiang (漢江) but historically known as the Hanshui (漢水). See also[edit]Han River (汉江)This article related to a river in China is a stub
[...More...]

"Xihan River" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

List Of Rivers Of China
This incomplete list of rivers that flow through China
China
is organized according to the body of water into which each river empties, beginning with the Sea of Okhotsk
Sea of Okho

[...More...]

"List Of Rivers Of China" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Amur River
The Amur River
River
(Even: Тамур, Tamur; Russian: река́ Аму́р, IPA: [ɐˈmur]) or Heilong Jiang (Chinese: 黑龙江; pinyin: Hēilóng Jiāng, "Black Dragon River"; Manchu: ᠰᠠᡥᠠᠯᡳᠶᠠᠨ ᡠᠯᠠorᡥᡝᠯᡠᠩ ᡤᡳᠶᠠᠩ[2]; Möllendorff: sahaliyan ula/helung giyang; Abkai: sahaliyan ula/helung giyang, "Black Water") is the world's tenth longest river, forming the border between the Russian Far East and Northeastern China
China
(Inner Manchuria). The largest fish species in the Amur is the kaluga, attaining a length as great as 5.6 metres (18 ft).[3] The Amur River
River
is the only river in the world in which subtropical Asian fish such as snakehead, coexist with Arctic Siberian fish, such as pike
[...More...]

"Amur River" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Han Dynasty
Coordinates: 34°09′21″N 108°56′47″E / 34.15583°N 108.94639°E / 34.15583; 108.94639Han dynasty漢朝206 BC–220 ADA map of the Western Han
Western Han
Dynasty in 2 AD: 1) the territory shaded in dark blue represents the principalities and centrally-administered commanderies of the Han Empire; 2) the light blue area shows the extent of the Tarim Basin
[...More...]

"Han Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Huai River
The Huai River, formerly romanized as the Hwai, is a major river in China. It is located about midway between the Yellow River
Yellow River
and Yangtze,[1] the two largest rivers in China, and like them runs from west to east. Historically draining directly into the Yellow Sea, floods have changed the course of the river such that it is now a major tributary of the Yangtze. The Huai is notoriously vulnerable to flooding. The Huai River- Qin Mountains
Qin Mountains
line is generally regarded as the geographical dividing line between Northern and southern China. This line approximates the 0 degree January isotherm and the 800 mm isohyet in China
[...More...]

"Huai River" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hai River
The Hai River
Hai River
(lit."Sea River"), formerly known as the Peiho, Pei He or Pei Ho ("White River"), is a Chinese river connecting Beijing
Beijing
to Tianjin
Tianjin
and the Bohai Sea. The Hai River
Hai River
at Tianjin
Tianjin
is formed by the confluence of five rivers, the Southern Canal, Ziya River, Daqing River, Yongding River, and the Northern Canal. The southern and northern canals are parts of the Grand Canal. The Southern Canal is joined by the Wei River
Wei River
at Linqing. The Northern Canal joins with the Bai He (or Chaobai River) at Tongzhou. The Northern Canal (sharing a channel with Bai He) is also the only waterway from the sea to Beijing
[...More...]

"Hai River" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Liao River
The Liao River
River
(simplified Chinese: 辽河; traditional Chinese: 遼河; pinyin: Liáo Hé; Jyutping: liu4 ho4) is the principal river in southern Northeast China, and one of the seven main river systems in mainland China. The province of Liaoning
Liaoning
and the Liaodong
Liaodong
Peninsula derive their names from this river.[1] The river is also popularly known as the "mother river" in Northeast China.[2] Coursing 1,345 kilometres (836 mi) long, the Liao River
River
system drains a catchment basin of over 232,000 square kilometres (90,000 sq mi), but its mean discharge is quite small at only about 500 cubic metres per second (18,000 cu ft/s), about one-twentieth that of the Pearl River
[...More...]

"Liao River" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.