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Hamid Naderi Yeganeh
Hamid Naderi Yeganeh
Hamid Naderi Yeganeh
(Persian: حمید نادری یگانه‎; born July 26, 1990 in Iran[1]) is an Iranian mathematical artist.[2][3][4] He is known for using mathematical formulas to create drawings of real-life objects, intricate illustrations, animations, fractals and tessellations.[5][6][7] His artwork 9,000 Ellipses was used as the background cover image of
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Qom
Qom
Qom
( pronunciation (help·info)) (Persian: قم‎) is the eighth largest city in Iran. It lies 125 kilometres (78 mi) by road southwest of Tehran
Tehran
and is the capital of Qom
Qom
Province. At the 2016 census its population was 1,201,158. It is situated on the banks of the Qom
Qom
River. Qom
Qom
is considered holy by Shiʿa Islam, as it is the site of the shrine of Fatimah bint Musa, sister of Imam `Ali ibn Musa Rida (Persian Imam Reza, 789–816 AD). The city is the largest center for Shiʿa scholarship in the world, and is a significant destination of pilgrimage
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Scientific American
Scientific American
Scientific American
(informally abbreviated SciAm) is an American popular science magazine. Many famous scientists, including Albert Einstein, have contributed articles in the past 170 years. It is the oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the United States (though it only became monthly in 1921).Contents1 History 2 International editions 3 First issue 4 Editors 5 Special
Special
issues 6 Scientific American
Scientific American
50 award 7 Website 8 Columns 9 Television 10 Books 11 Scientific and political debate 12 Awards 13 Top 10 Science Stories of the Year 14 Controversy 15 See also 16 References 17 External linksHistory[edit] Scientific American
Scientific American
was founded by inventor and publisher Rufus M. Porter in 1845[2] as a four-page weekly newspaper. Throughout its early years, much emphasis was placed on reports of what was going on at the U.S
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Computer Art
Computer
Computer
art is any art in which computers play a role in production or display of the artwork. Such art can be an image, sound, animation, video, CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, video game, website, algorithm, performance or gallery installation. Many traditional disciplines are now integrating digital technologies and, as a result, the lines between traditional works of art and new media works created using computers has been blurred. For instance, an artist may combine traditional painting with algorithm art and other digital techniques. As a result, defining computer art by its end product can thus be difficult. Computer
Computer
art is by its nature evolutionary since changes in technology and software directly affect what is possible
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Paraboloid
In geometry, a paraboloid is a quadric surface that has (exactly) one axis of symmetry and no center of symmetry. The term "paraboloid" is derived from parabola, which refers to a conic section that has the same property of symmetry. There are two kinds of paraboloids, elliptic and hyperbolic, depending on the nature of the planar cross sections: A paraboloid is elliptic if almost all cross sections are ellipses; it is hyperbolic if almost all cross sections are hyperbolas. Equivalently, a paraboloid may be defined as a quadric surface that is not a cylinder, and has an implicit equation whose part of degree two may be factored over the complex numbers into two different linear factors. The paraboloid is hyperbolic if the factors are real and elliptic if the factors are complex conjugate. An elliptic paraboloid is shaped like an oval cup and has a maximum or minimum point when its axis is vertical
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Minimal Surface
In mathematics, a minimal surface is a surface that locally minimizes its area. This is equivalent to having zero mean curvature (see definitions below). The term "minimal surface" is used because these surfaces originally arose as surfaces that minimized total surface area subject to some constraint. Physical models of area-minimizing minimal surfaces can be made by dipping a wire frame into a soap solution, forming a soap film, which is a minimal surface whose boundary is the wire frame. However the term is used for more general surfaces that may self-intersect or do not have constraints
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Catenary
In physics and geometry, a catenary (US: /ˈkætənˌɛri/, UK: /kəˈtiːnəri/) is the curve that an idealized hanging chain or cable assumes under its own weight when supported only at its ends. The catenary curve has a U-like shape, superficially similar in appearance to a parabolic arch, but it is not a parabola. The curve appears in the design of certain types of arches and as a cross section of the catenoid—the shape assumed by a soap film bounded by two parallel circular rings. The catenary is also called the alysoid, chainette,[1] or, particularly in the materials sciences, funicular.[2] Mathematically, the catenary curve is the graph of the hyperbolic cosine function. The surface of revolution of the catenary curve, the catenoid, is a minimal surface, specifically a minimal surface of revolution
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Algorithm
In mathematics and computer science, an algorithm (/ˈælɡərɪðəm/ ( listen) AL-gə-ridh-əm) is an unambiguous specification of how to solve a class of problems. Algorithms can perform calculation, data processing and automated reasoning tasks. An algorithm is an effective method that can be expressed within a finite amount of space and time[1] and in a well-defined formal language[2] for calculating a function.[3] Starting from an initial state and initial input (perhaps empty),[4] the instructions describe a computation that, when executed, proceeds through a finite[5] number of well-defined successive states, eventually producing "output"[6] and terminating at a final ending state. The transition from one state to the next is not necessarily deterministic; some algorithms, known as randomized algorithms, incorporate random input.[7] The concept of algorithm has existed for centuries and the use of the concept can be ascribed to Greek mathematicians, e.g
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Washington University In St. Louis
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis
(also referred to as WashU, or WUSTL) is a private research university located in the St. Louis metropolitan area and in Missouri, United States. Founded in 1853, and named after George Washington, the university has students and faculty from all 50 U.S. states and more than 120 countries.[6] As of 2017, 24 Nobel laureates have been affiliated with Washington University, nine having done the major part of their pioneering research at the university.[7] Washington University's undergraduate program is ranked 18th by U.S
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London Mathematical Society
The London
London
Mathematical Society (LMS) is one of the United Kingdom's learned societies for mathematics (the others being the Royal Statistical Society (RSS) and the Institute of Mathematics
Mathematics
and its Applications (IMA)).Contents1 History1.1 Proposal for unification with the IMA2 Activities 3 Publications 4 Prizes 5 List of presidents 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]De Morgan HouseThe Society was established on 16 January 1865, the first president being Augustus De Morgan. The earliest meetings were held in University College, but the Society soon moved into Burlington House, Piccadilly. The initial activities of the Society included talks and publication of a journal. The LMS was used as a model for the establishment of the American Mathematical Society in 1888. The Society was granted a royal charter in 1965, a century after its foundation
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Iran
Iran
Iran
(Persian: ایران‎ Irān [ʔiːˈɾɒːn] ( listen)), also known as Persia[10] (/ˈpɜːrʒə/),[11] officially the Islamic Republic
Islamic Republic
of Iran (Persian: جمهوری اسلامی ایران‎ Jomhuri-ye Eslāmi-ye Irān ( listen)),[12] is a sovereign state in Western Asia.[13][14] With over 81 million inhabitants,[6] Iran
Iran
is the world's 18th-most-populous country.[15] Comprising a land area of 1,648,195 km2 (636,372 sq mi), it is the second-largest country in the Middle East
Middle East
and the 17th-largest in the world
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The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
is a British daily newspaper. It was founded in 1821 as The Manchester
Manchester
Guardian, and changed its name in 1959. Along with its sister papers The Observer and The Guardian
The Guardian
Weekly, the Guardian is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust. The trust was created in 1936 to "secure the financial and editorial independence of the Guardian in perpetuity and to safeguard the journalistic freedom and liberal values of the Guardian free from commercial or political interference".[4] The trust was converted into a limited company in 2008, with a constitution written so as to maintain for The Guardian
The Guardian
the same protections as were built into the structure of the Scott Trust by its creators
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Science Friday
Science
Science
Friday (known as SciFri for short) is a weekly call-in talk show that broadcasts each Friday on public radio stations, distributed by PRI.[1][2] SciFri is hosted by award-winning science journalist Ira Flatow and was created and is produced by ScienceFriday, Inc. The program is divided into two, one-hour programs, with each hour ending with a complete sign-off. The focus of each program is news and information on nature, science, and technology. For most of its existence, Science
Science
Friday was a sub-program within Talk
Talk
of the Nation; it was spun off as a series in its own right when Talk
Talk
of the Nation was canceled in June 2013. Science
Science
Friday is also available in a podcasting format and is one of the most popular iTunes downloads, frequently in the top 15 downloads each week
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American Mathematical Society
The American Mathematical Society
American Mathematical Society
(AMS) is an association of professional mathematicians dedicated to the interests of mathematical research and scholarship, and serves the national and international community through its publications, meetings, advocacy and other programs. The society is one of the four parts of the Joint Policy Board for Mathematics
Mathematics
and a member of the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences.Contents1 History 2 Meetings 3 Fellows 4 Publications 5 Prizes 6 Typesetting 7 Presidents7.1 1888–1900 7.2 1901–1950 7.3 1951–2000 7.4 2001–present8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] The AMS was founded in 1888 as the New York Mathematical Society, the brainchild of Thomas Fiske, who was impressed by the London Mathematical Society on a visit to England
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Huffington Post
HuffPost
HuffPost
(formerly The Huffington Post and sometimes abbreviated HuffPo)[2] is a liberal[3] American news and opinion website and blog that has both localized and international editions
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Kayhan
Kayhan
Kayhan
(Persian: کيهان‬‎, English: The Cosmos) is a newspaper in Iran. It is considered "the most conservative Iranian newspaper."[2] Hossein Shariatmadari
Hossein Shariatmadari
is the editor-in-chief of Kayhan. His official position is representative of the Supreme Leader.[3] Its 2007 circulation was about 70,000, with about 1,000 employees worldwide.[3] Kayhan
Kayhan
also publishes special foreign editions, which include the English-language Kayhan
Kayhan
International.[2] Its circulation in 2008 is estimated to be 350,000.[4]Contents1 History and profile 2 Political orientation 3 Controversies 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory and profile[edit] Kayhan
Kayhan
was founded in February 1943[5] by owner Abdul-Rahman Faramarzi and Mostafa Mesbahzadeh as editor-in-chief. Later the roles of Faramarzi and Mesbahzadeh were reversed
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