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Hagiography
A hagiography (/ˌhæɡiˈɒɡrəfi/; from Greek ἅγιος, hagios, meaning 'holy', and -γραφία, -graphia, meaning 'writing')[1] is a biography of a saint or an ecclesiastical leader. The term hagiography may be used to refer to the biography of a saint or highly developed spiritual being in any of the world's spiritual traditions. Christian
Christian
hagiographies focus on the lives, and notably the miracles, ascribed to men and women canonized by the Roman Catholic church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox churches, and the Church of the East
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Grendel's Mother
Grendel's mother
Grendel's mother
(Old English: Grendles mōðor) is one of three antagonists in the anonymous Old English
Old English
poem Beowulf
Beowulf
(c. 700–1000 AD). The other antagonists are Grendel
Grendel
and the dragon, all aligned in opposition to the hero Beowulf. She is introduced in lines 1258b to 1259a as: "Grendles modor/ides, aglæcwif." Grendel's mother, who is never given a name in the text, is the subject of ongoing controversy among medieval scholars. This is due to the ambiguity of a few words in Old English
Old English
which appear in the original Beowulf
Beowulf
manuscript
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Western Europe
Western Europe
Europe
is the region comprising the western part of Europe. Below, some different geographic, geopolitical and cultural definitions of the term are outlined. Significant historical events that have shaped the concept of Western Europe
Europe
include the rise of Rome, the adoption of Greek cultu
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Literary Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or even (as in the case of fiction) length. The distinctions between genres and categories are flexible and loosely defined, often with subgroups. The most general genres in literature are (in loose chronological order) epic, tragedy,[1] comedy, and creative nonfiction.[citation needed] They can all be in the form of prose or poetry. Additionally, a genre such as satire, allegory or pastoral might appear in any of the above, not only as a subgenre (see below), but as a mixture of genres. Finally, they are defined by the general cultural movement of the historical period in which they were composed. Genre
Genre
should not be confused with age categories, by which literature may be classified as either adult, young adult, or children's
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Christian
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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Menaion
The Menaion
Menaion
(Greek: Μηναῖον; Slavonic: Минеѧ, Minéya, "of the month") is the liturgical book used by the Eastern Orthodox Church[note 1] containing the propers for fixed dates of the calendar year, i.e
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Adjective
In linguistics, an adjective (abbreviated adj) is a describing word, the main syntactic role of which is to qualify a noun or noun phrase, giving more information about the object signified.[1] Adjectives are one of the English parts of speech, although historically they were classed together with the nouns.[2] Certain words that were traditionally considered to be adjectives, including the, this, my, etc., are today usually classed separately, as determiners.Contents1 Etymology 2 Types of use 3 Distribution 4 Adverbs 5 Determiners 6 Adjective phrases 7 Other modifiers of nouns 8 Order 9 Comparison 10 Restrictiveness 11 Agreement 12 See also 13 References 14 Bibliography 15 External linksEtymology[edit] See also:
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Grammatical Gender
In linguistics, grammatical gender is a specific form of noun class system in which the division of noun classes forms an agreement system with another aspect of the language, such as adjectives, articles, pronouns, or verbs. This system is used in approximately one quarter of the world's languages. In these languages, most or all nouns inherently carry one value of the grammatical category called gender;[2] the values present in a given language (of which there are usually two or three) are called the genders of that language. According to one definition: "Genders are classes of nouns reflected in the behaviour of associated words."[3][4][5] Common gender divisions include masculine and feminine; masculine, feminine and neuter; or animate and inanimate
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Sermon
A sermon is an oration, lecture, or talk by a member of a religious institution or clergy. Sermons address a Biblical, theological, religious, or moral topic, usually expounding on a type of belief, law or behavior within both past and present contexts. Elements of the sermon often include exposition, exhortation and practical application. In Christianity, a sermon is usually delivered in a place of worship from an elevated architectural feature, variously known as a pulpit, a lectern, or an ambo. The word "sermon" comes from a Middle English word which was derived from Old French, which in turn came from the Latin word sermō meaning "discourse". The word can mean "conversation", which could mean that early sermons were delivered in the form of question and answer, and that only later did it come to mean a monologue
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Paterikon
Patericon or paterikon (Greek: πατερικόν), a short form for πατερικόν βιβλίον ("father's book", usually Lives of the Fathers in English), is a genre of Byzantine literature of religious character, which were collections of sayings of saints, martyrs and hierarchs, and tales about them. Among the earliest collections of this kind are the Αποφθέγματα των άγίων γερόντων (Apophthegmata of Saint Elders, also known as the Alphabetical Patericon, Apophthegmata Patrum, Sayings of the Fathers of the Desert (Sayings of the Desert Fathers) [1]), the Egyptian Paterikon (Historia Monachorum in Aegypto, History of Monks in Egypt) and Λαυσαϊχόν (Historia Lausiaca, [2]) by Palladius - of the 4th century
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Jacob De Voragine
Jacopo De Fazio, best known as the blessed Jacobus da Varagine[1] (Italian: Giacomo da Varazze, Jacopo da Varazze; c. 1230 – July 13 or July 16, 1298) was an Italian chronicler and archbishop of Genoa. He was the author, or more accurately the compiler, of Legenda Aurea, the Golden Legend, a collection of the legendary lives of the greater saints of the medieval church that was one of the most popular religious works of the Middle Ages.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Marian views 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBiography[edit] Jacobus was born in Varagine[3] (Varazze), on the Ligurian coast between Savona and Genoa. He entered the Dominican order in 1244, and became the prior at Como, Bologna and Asti in succession.[4] Besides preaching with success in many parts of Italy, he also taught in the schools of his own fraternity
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Pejorative
A pejorative (also called a derogatory term,[1] a slur, a term of abuse, or a term of disparagement) is a word or grammatical form expressing a negative connotation or a low opinion of someone or something, showing a lack of respect for someone or something.[2] It is also used as criticism, hostility, disregard or disrespect. A term can be regarded as pejorative in some social or cultural groups but not in others. Sometimes, a term may begin as a pejorative and eventually be adopted in a non-pejorative sense (or vice versa) in some or all contexts. Name slurs can also involve an insulting or disparaging innuendo,[3] rather than being a direct pejorative
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Gniezno Doors
The Gniezno Doors (Polish: Drzwi Gnieźnieńskie) are a pair of bronze doors at the entrance to Gniezno Cathedral in Gniezno, Poland, a Gothic building which the doors pre-date, having been carried over from an earlier building. They are decorated with eighteen scenes in bas-relief from the life of St. Adalbert, or Wojciech in Polish, whose remains had been bought for their weight in gold (shown in scene 16), and carried back to the cathedral and set up in a shrine there.[1][2] They were made in about 1175 during the reign of Mieszko III the Old and are one of the most significant works of Romanesque art in Poland.Contents1 Placing the origin of the doors 2 Description 3 Subjects of the panels 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksPlacing the origin of the doors[edit] Locating the origin of the doors has been the subject of much discussion. It is clear that their style derives from the Mosan area in modern Belgium and France
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Gniezno Cathedral
The Royal Gniezno Cathedral (The Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. Adalbert, Polish: Bazylika Archikatedralna Wniebowzięcia Najświętszej Marii Panny i św. Wojciecha) is a Brick Gothic cathedral located in the historical city of Gniezno that served as the coronation place for several Polish monarchs and as the seat of Polish church officials continuously for nearly 1000 years. Throughout its long and tragic history, the building stayed mostly intact making it one of the oldest and most precious sacral monuments in Poland.[1] The Cathedral is known for its twelfth-century (ca. 1175), two-winged bronze doors decorated with scenes of martyrdom of St. Adalbert of Prague and a silver relic coffin of that saint
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Romanesque Art
Romanesque art
Romanesque art
is the art of Europe from approximately 1000 AD to the rise of the Gothic style in the 12th century, or later, depending on region. The preceding period is known as the Pre-Romanesque
Pre-Romanesque
period. The term was invented by 19th-century art historians, especially for Romanesque architecture, which retained many basic features of Roman architectural style – most notably round-headed arches, but also barrel vaults, apses, and acanthus-leaf decoration – but had also developed many very different characteristics. In Southern France, Spain
Spain
and Italy
Italy
there was an architectural continuity with the Late Antique, but the Romanesque style was the first style to spread across the whole of Catholic Europe, from Sicily to Scandinavia
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Adalbert Of Prague
Adalbert of Prague
Prague
(Latin: Adalbertus; c. 956 – 23 April 997), known in Czech by his birth name Vojtěch (Latin: Voitecus), was a Bohemian missionary and Christian saint. He was the Bishop of Prague and a missionary to the Hungarians, Poles, and Prussians, who was martyred in his efforts to convert the Baltic Prussians to Christianity. He is said to be the composer of Bogurodzica, the oldest known Polish hymn, but this is now thought unlikely, as he did not know the language.[1] St. Adalbert (or St. Vojtěch; Czech: Svatý Vojtěch  pronunciation, Polish: Święty Wojciech) was later declared the patron saint of the Czech Republic, Poland, and the former polity of Prussia. He is also the patron saint of the Archdiocese of Esztergom.[2]Contents1 Life1.1 Early Years 1.2 Episcopacy 1.3 Mission and Martyrdom in Prussia2 Veneration and Relics2.1 Churches and parishes named for St
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