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Hafiz (Quran)
Hafiz (Arabic: حافظ‎, translit. ḥāfiẓ, حُفَّاظ, pl. ḥuffāẓ, حافظة f. ḥāfiẓa), literally meaning "guardian" or "memorizer", depending on the context, is a term used by Muslims for someone who has completely memorized the Qur'an. Hafiza is the female equivalent.[1]Contents1 History 2 Study 3 Etymology 4 Practice 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
lived in the 7th century CE, in Arabia
Arabia
in a time when few people were literate. The Arabs
Arabs
preserved their histories, genealogies, and poetry by memory alone. Muslims believe that when Muhammad
Muhammad
proclaimed the verses later collected as the Qur'an, his followers preserved the words by memorizing them
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Samarkand Kufic Quran
The Samarkand
Samarkand
Kufic
Kufic
Quran
Quran
(also known as the Uthman Quran, Samarkand codex, Samarkand
Samarkand
manuscript and Tashkent
Tashkent
Quran) is an 8th or 9th century manuscript Quran
Quran
written in the territory of modern Iraq
Iraq
in the Kufic
Kufic
script
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Book
A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it. The book's most common modern form is that of a codex volume consisting of rectangular paper pages bound on one side, with a heavier cover and spine, so that it can fan open for reading. Books have taken other forms, such as scrolls, leaves on a string, or strips tied together; and the pages have been of parchment, vellum, papyrus, bamboo slips, palm leaves, silk, wood, and other materials.[1] The contents of books are also called books, as are other compositions of that length. For instance, Aristotle's Physics, the constituent sections of the Bible, and even the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Book of the Dead
are called books independently of their physical form. Conversely, some long literary compositions are divided into books of varying sizes, which typically do not correspond to physically bound units
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Prophets And Messengers In Islam
Prophets in Islam
Islam
(Arabic: الأنبياء في الإسلام‎) include "messengers" (rasul, pl. rusul), bringers of a divine revelation via an angel (Arabic: ملائكة, malāʾikah);[1][2] and "prophets" (nabī, pl. anbiyāʼ), lawbringers that Muslims believe were sent by God
God
to every person, bringing God's message in a language they can understand.[1][3] Knowledge of the Islamic prophets is one of the six articles of the Islamic faith, and specifically mentioned in the Quran.[4] Muslims believe that the first prophet was also the first human being, Adam
Adam
(ادم), created by Allah
Allah
(الله). Many of the revelations delivered by the 48 prophets in Judaism and many prophets of Christianity are mentioned as such in the Quran
Quran
but usually in slightly different forms
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Sana'a Manuscript
The Sana'a
Sana'a
palimpsest, sometimes referred to as Ṣanʿā’ 1, or as DAM 01-27.1 (with reference to the catalog number for the major collection of its folios) is one of the oldest Quranic manuscripts in existence.[1] Part of a sizable cache of Quranic and non-Quranic fragments discovered in Yemen
Yemen
during a 1972 restoration of the Great Mosque of Sana'a, the manuscript was identified as a palimpsest Quran in 1981; as it is written on parchment and comprises two layers of text. The upper text largely conforms to the standard 'Uthmanic' Quran in text and in the standard order of suras; whereas the lower text contains many variations from the standard text, and the sequence of its suras corresponds to no known quranic order
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Quranism
Quranism (Arabic: القرآنية‎; al-Qur'āniyya) describes any form of Islam
Islam
that accepts the Quran
Quran
as revelation but rejects the religious authority, and/or authenticity of, the Hadith
Hadith
collections. Quranists follow the Quran
Quran
alone; they believe that its message is clear and complete, and that it can therefore be fully understood without referencing the Hadith
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Quranic Hermeneutics
Qur'anic hermeneutics is the study of theories of the interpretation and understanding of the Qur'an, the sacred text of Islam. Since the early centuries of Islam, scholars have sought to mine the wealth of its meanings by developing a variety of different systems of hermeneutics.Contents1 Introduction 2 Specific issues in Islamic hermeneutics2.1 Human rights 2.2 The position of women3 References 4 External linksIntroduction[edit] Hermeneutics
Hermeneutics
in Islam
Islam
leans on a lengthy tradition of tafsir, the exegesis of usually the Qur'an
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God In Islam
In Islam, God
God
(Arabic: الله‎, translit. Allāh, contraction of الْإِلٰه al-ilāh, lit. "the god") is indivisible, the God, the absolute one, the all-powerful and all-knowing ruler of the universe, and the creator of everything in existence within the universe. Islam
Islam
emphasizes that God
God
is strictly singular (tawḥīd ): unique (wāḥid ), inherently One (aḥad ),[1] also all-merciful and omnipotent.[2] According to Islamic teachings, beyond the Throne[3] and according to the Quran, "No vision can grasp him, but His grasp is over all vision: He is above all comprehension, yet is acquainted with all things."[4][5] The Surat 112 Al-'Ikhlās (The Sincerity) says: "He is God, [who is] One. God, the Eternal Refuge
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Islamic Eschatology
— Events —Death Resurrection Last JudgementJewishMessianism Book
Book
of Daniel KabbalahTaoistLi HongZoroastrianFrashokereti SaoshyantInter-religiousEnd times Apocalypticism2012 phenomenonMillenarianism Last Judgment Resurrection
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Muqattaʿat
The Muqattaʿāt (Arabic: حروف مقطعات‎ ḥurūf muqaṭṭaʿāt "disjoined letters" or "disconnected letters";[1] also "mysterious letters") are combinations of between one and five Arabic letters figuring at the beginning of 29 out of the 114 surahs (chapters) of the Quran
Quran
just after the Bismillah.[2] The letters are also known as fawātih (فواتح) or "openers" as they form the opening verse of their respective suras . Four surahs are named for their muqatta'at, Ṭā-Hā, Yā-Sīn , Ṣād and Qāf. The original significance of the letters is unknown
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Principles Of Islamic Jurisprudence
A principle is a concept or value that is a guide for behavior or evaluation. In law, it is a rule that has to be, or usually is to be followed, or can be desirably followed, or is an inevitable consequence of something, such as the laws observed in nature or the way that a system is constructed
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Fiqh
Fiqh
Fiqh
(/fɪk/; Arabic: فقه‎ [fɪqh]) is Islamic jurisprudence.[1] While sharia is believed by Muslims to represent divine law as revealed in the Quran
Quran
and the Sunnah
Sunnah
(the teachings and practices of the Islamic prophet
Islamic prophet
Muhammad), fiqh is the human understanding of the sharia[2]—sharia expanded and developed by interpretation (ijtihad) of the Quran
Quran
and Sunnah
Sunnah
by Islamic jurists (ulama)[2] and implemented by the rulings (fatwa) of jurists on questions presented to them. Thus conceptually, whereas sharia is considered immutable and infallible, fiqh is considered fallible and changeable. Fiqh
Fiqh
deals with the observance of rituals, morals and social legislation in Islam
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Ahmadiyya Translations Of The Quran
Translations
Translations
is a three-act play by Irish playwright Brian Friel, written in 1980. It is set in Baile Beag (Ballybeg), a Donegal village in 19th century agricultural Ireland. Friel has said that Translations is "a play about language and only about language", but it deals with a wide range of issues, stretching from language and communication to Irish history and cultural imperialism. Friel responds strongly to both political and language questions in the modern-day Republic of Ireland
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Asbab Al-nuzul
Asbāb al-nuzūl (أسباب النزول), meaning occasions or circumstances of revelation, refers to the historical context in which Quranic verses were revealed. Though of some use in reconstructing the Qur'an's historicity, asbāb is by nature an exegetical rather than a historiographical genre, and as such usually associates the verses it explicates with general situations rather than specific events.Contents1 Etymology 2 Origin 3 Outline and Function3.1 Lexical/Sentential 3.2 Pericopal 3.3 Narratological 3.4 Historical/Ethnological 3.5 Legal4 History of Asbab al-Nuzul works 5 See also 6 Notes 7 Further readingEtymology[edit] Asbāb is the plural of the Arabic word sabab, which means "cause", "reason", or "occasion", and nuzūl is the verbal noun of the verb root nzl, literally meaning "to descend" or "to send down", and thus (metaphorically) "to reveal", referring Allah
Allah
sending down a revelation to his prophets
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Esoteric Interpretation Of The Quran
Esoteric interpretation of the Quran, also known as Sufi interpretation and taʾwīl (تأويل), is the allegorical interpretation of the Quran
Quran
or the quest for its hidden, inner meanings. It was a synonym of conventional interpretation in its earliest use, but it came to mean a process of discerning its most fundamental understandings.[1] Esoteric interpretations do not usually contradict the conventional (in this context called exoteric) interpretations; instead, they discuss the inner levels of meaning of the Quran.[2] The words Ta'wil and Tafsir
Tafsir
have been translated to mean explanation, elucidation, interpretation, and commentary; but from the end of the 8th century onwards, 'ta'wil' was commonly regarded as the esoteric or mystical interpretation of the Quran, while the conventional exegesis of the Quran
Quran
was called "tafsir"
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Naskh (tafsir)
Naskh (نسخ) is an Arabic
Arabic
word usually translated as "abrogation"; It is a term used in Islamic
Islamic
legal exegesis for seemingly contradictory material within, or between, the two primary sources of Islamic
Islamic
law: the Quran
Quran
and the Sunna. Several Qur'anic verses state that some revelations have been abrogated and superseded by later revelations,[1][2] which are understood by many Muslim scholars as pertaining to the verses of the Quran
Quran
itself.[citation needed] Neither the Quran
Quran
nor the sayings of Muhammad
Muhammad
state which verses stand abrogated
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