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Hadleigh, Suffolk
Hadleigh (pronounced /ˈhædlɪ/) is an ancient market town and civil parish in South Suffolk, East Anglia, situated, next to the River Brett, between the larger towns of Sudbury and Ipswich. It had a population of 8,253 at the 2011 census.[1] The headquarters of Babergh District Council were located in the town until 2017.[2][3]Contents1 Origin of the name 2 History 3 Religion 4 Economy 5 Culture 6 Sport and leisure 7 Notable people 8 References 9 External linksOrigin of the name[edit] Skeat, in his 1913 The Place-Names of Suffolk, says this:Spelt Hadlega, R.B.; Hadleigh, Ipm.; Hædleage, in a late chapter, Thorpe, Diplomat, 527; Headlega, Annals of St Neot, quoted in Plummer's ed. of the A.S.Chronicle, ii. 102; Hetlega, D.B., p.184. In D.B. the t stands for th; and the true A.S. form appears in a Worcs. charter, dated 849, as hæðleage(gen.) with reference to Headley Heath (a tautological name) in Birch, C.S. ii. 40; see Duignan, Placenames of Worcs
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Georgian Architecture
Georgian architecture
Georgian architecture
is the name given in most English-speaking countries to the set of architectural styles current between 1714 and 1830. It is eponymous for the first four British monarchs of the House of Hanover—George I, George II, George III, and George IV—who reigned in continuous succession from August 1714 to June 1830. The style was revived in the late 19th century in the United States as Colonial Revival architecture
Colonial Revival architecture
and in the early 20th century in Great Britain as Neo-Georgian architecture; in both it is also called Georgian Revival architecture
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Market Town
Market town
Market town
or market right is a legal term, originating in the Middle Ages, for a European settlement that has the right to host markets, distinguishing it from a village and city. A town may be correctly described as a "market town" or as having "market rights", even if it no longer holds a market, provided the legal right to do so still exists.Contents1 Brief history 2 Czech Republic 3 German-language area 4 Hungary 5 Norway 6 United Kingdom and Ireland6.1 England
England
and Wales 6.2 Ireland 6.3 Scotland7 In art and literature 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksBrief history[edit] The primary purpose of a market town is the provision of goods and services to the surrounding locality.[1] Although market towns were known in antiquity, their number increased rapidly from the 12th century
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East Of England (European Parliament Constituency)
East of England
England
is a constituency of the European Parliament. It currently elects 7 MEPs using the d'Hondt method of party-list proportional representation.Contents1 Boundaries 2 History 3 Returned members 4 Election results 5 ReferencesBoundaries[edit] The constituency corresponds to the East of England
England
region of the United Kingdom, comprising the ceremonial counties of Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Norfolk
Norfolk
and Suffolk. History[edit] It was formed as a result of the European Parliamentary Elections Act 1999, replacing a number of single-member constituencies
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List Of United Kingdom Parliament Constituencies
There are 650 constituencies in the United Kingdom, each electing a single Member of Parliament to the House of Commons ordinarily every five years. Voting
Voting
last took place in all 650 of those constituencies at the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
general election on 8 June 2017, and these results have been counted and verified. The election on 8 June 2017 elected 650 constituencies. 317 are held by the Conservative Party, 262 are held by the Labour Party, 35 are held by the Scottish National Party, 12 are held by the Liberal Democrats and 10 are held by the Democratic Unionist Party, with the balance held by various smaller parties, none of which have more than 8 seats, plus four unaffiliated MPs
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam–Bap Location names beginning with Bar
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List Of Places In England
Here is a list of places, divided by ceremonial county of England.Northumberland Durham Lancashire Cheshire Derbs. Notts. Lincolnshire Leics. Staffs. Shropshire Warks. Northants. Norfolk Suffolk Essex Herts. Beds. Bucks. Oxon. Glos. Somerset Wiltshire Berkshire Kent Surrey Hampshire Dorset Devon Cornwall Heref. Worcs. Bristol East Riding of Yorkshire Rutland Cambs. Greater London Tyne & Wear Cumbria North Yorkshire South Yorks. West Yorkshire Greater Manc. Merseyside East Sussex West Sussex Isle of Wight West MidlandsSee also[edit]Toponymy of Great Britain Toponymical list of counties of the United Kingdom List of generic forms in British place names List of places in the United Kingdom Subdivisions of the United Kingdom List of places in Northern Ireland List of places in Scotland List of places in Wales List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Englandv t eList of places in EnglandBedfordshire Berkshire Bristol Buckinghamshire
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Wool
Wool
Wool
is the textile fiber obtained from sheep and other animals, including cashmere and mohair from goats, qiviut from muskoxen, angora from rabbits, and other types of wool from camelids.[1] Wool
Wool
mainly consists of protein together with a few percent lipids. In this regard it is chemically quite distinct from the more dominant textile, cotton, which is mainly cellulose.[1]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Processing2.1 Shearing 2.2 Scouring3 Fineness and yield 4 History 5 Production 6 Marketing6.1 Australia 6.2 Other countries7 Yarn 8 Uses 9 Events 10 See also10.1 Production 10.2 Processing 10.3 Refined products 10.4 Organizations 10.5 Miscellaneous wool11 References 12 External linksCharacteristics[edit]Champion hogget fleece, Walcha Show Wool
Wool
is produced by follicles which are small cells located in the skin
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Pargeting
Pargeting
Pargeting
(or sometimes pargetting) is a decorative or waterproofing plastering applied to building walls. The term, if not the practice, is particularly associated with the English counties of Suffolk
Suffolk
and Essex. In the neighbouring county of Norfolk
Norfolk
the term "pinking" is used.[1]The "Ancient House" in Ipswich
Ipswich
shows a particularly fine example of pargeting, depicting scenes from the four continents. When the hall was built in 1670, Australia
Australia
and Antarctica
Antarctica
had not yet been discovered, and the Americas were considered a single continent.Patrick Leigh Fermor describes similar decorations on pre-World War II buildings in Linz, Austria. "Pargeted façades rose up, painted chocolate, green, purple, cream and blue
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East Of England Ambulance Service
The East of England
East of England
Ambulance
Ambulance
Service NHS Trust (EEAST) is the authority responsible for providing National Health Service
National Health Service
(NHS) ambulance services in the counties of Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Norfolk
Norfolk
and Suffolk, in the East of England region. These consist of 5.8 million people and 7,500 square miles. It is one of 10 Ambulance
Ambulance
Trusts providing England with emergency medical services, and is part of the NHS, receiving direct government funding for its role
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East Anglia
East Anglia
East Anglia
is a geographical area in the East of England. The area included has varied[1] but the legally defined NUTS 2 statistical unit comprises the counties of Norfolk, Suffolk
Suffolk
and Cambridgeshire, including the City of Peterborough
Peterborough
unitary authority.[2] The name derives from the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
kingdom of the East Angles, a tribe that originated in Angeln, northern Germany.Contents1 Area 2 History 3 Geography3.1 Climate4 Transport 5 Universities 6 Enterprise zones 7 Symbols and culture 8 Tourism 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksArea[edit] Definitions of what constitutes East Anglia
East Anglia
vary
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Battle Of Edington
Coordinates: 51°15′50″N 02°08′34″W / 51.26389°N 2.14278°W / 51.26389; -2.14278Battle of EdingtonPart of the Viking invasions of EnglandMemorial to the Battle of Ethandun erected in 2000 near Bratton Castle.[1]Date May 878Location Probably Edington, WiltshireResult Decisive West Saxon victoryBelligerentsWest Saxons Danelaw
Danelaw
VikingsCommanders and leadersAlfred the Great Guthrum
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Domesday Book
Domesday Book
Domesday Book
(/ˈduːmzdeɪ/ or US: /ˈdoʊmzdeɪ/;[1][2] Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:[3]Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester
Gloucester
with his council ... . After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men
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Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
is a collection of annals in Old English chronicling the history of the Anglo-Saxons. The original manuscript of the Chronicle was created late in the 9th century, probably in Wessex, during the reign of Alfred the Great
Alfred the Great
(r. 871–899). Multiple copies were made of that one original and then distributed to monasteries across England, where they were independently updated. In one case, the Chronicle was still being actively updated in 1154. Nine manuscripts survive in whole or in part, though not all are of equal historical value and none of them is the original version. The oldest seems to have been started towards the end of Alfred's reign, while the most recent was written at Peterborough Abbey after a fire at that monastery in 1116
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