HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

HTML Editor
An HTML editor is a program for editing HTML, the markup of a web page. Although the HTML markup in a web page can be controlled with any text editor, specialized HTML editors can offer convenience and added functionality. For example, many HTML editors handle not only HTML, but also related technologies such as CSS, XML and JavaScript or ECMAScript. In some cases they also manage communication with remote web servers via FTP and WebDAV, and version control systems such as Subversion or Git
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Browser Engine
A browser engine (also known as a layout engine or rendering engine) is a core software component of every major web browser. The primary job of a browser engine is to transform HTML documents and other resources of a web page into an interactive visual representation on a user's device. A browser engine is not a stand-alone computer program but a critical piece of a larger program, such as a web browser, from which the term is derived. (The word "engine" is an analogy to the engine of a car.) Besides "browser engine", two other terms are in common use regarding related concepts: "layout engine" and "rendering engine".[1][2][3] In theory, layout and rendering (or "painting") could be handled by separate engines
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Computer Program
A computer program is a collection of instructions[1] that can be executed by a computer to perform a specific task. A computer program is usually written by a computer programmer in a programming language. From the program in its human-readable form of source code, a compiler or assembler can derive machine code—a form consisting of instructions that the computer can directly execute
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Markup Language
In computer text processing, a markup language is a system for annotating a document in a way that is syntactically distinguishable from the text,[1] meaning when the document is processed for display, the markup language is not shown, and is only used to format the text.[2] The idea and terminology evolved from the "marking up" of paper manuscripts (i.e., the revision instructions by editors), which is traditionally written with a red pen or blue pencil on authors' manuscripts.[3] Such "markup" typically includes both content corrections (such as spelling, punctuation, or movement of content), and also typographic instructions, such as to make a heading larger or boldface. In digital media, this "blue pencil instruction text" was replaced by tags which ideally indicate what the parts of the document are, rather than details of how they might be shown on some display
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Web Page
A web page (or webpage) is a specific collection of information provided by a website and displayed to a user in a web browser. A website typically consists of many web pages linked together in a coherent fashion. The name "web page" is a metaphor of paper pages bound together into a book. The core element of a web page is one or more text files written in the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML).[1] Many web pages also make use of JavaScript code for dynamic behavior and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) code for presentation semantics.[1] Images, videos, and other multimedia files are also often embedded in web pages. Each web page is identified by a distinct Uniform Resource Locator (URL). When the user inputs a URL into their browser, that page's elements are downloaded from web servers
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Extensible Markup Language
Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a markup language that defines a set of rules for encoding documents in a format that is both human-readable and machine-readable. The World Wide Web Consortium's XML 1.0 Specification[2] of 1998[3] and several other related specifications[4]—all of them free open standards—define XML.[5] The design goals of XML emphasize simplicity, generality, and usability across the Internet.[6] It is a textual data format with strong support via Unicode for different human languages
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Webdav
WebDAV (Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning) is an extension of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) that allows clients to perform remote Web content authoring operations. WebDAV is defined in RFC 4918 by a working group of the Internet Engineering Task Force. The WebDAV1 protocol provides a framework for users to create, change and move documents on a server. The most important features of the WebDAV protocol include the maintenance of properties about an author or modification date, namespace management, collections, and overwrite protection. Maintenance of properties includes such things as the creation, removal, and querying of file information. Namespace management deals with the ability to copy and move web pages within a server's namespace. Collections deal with the creation, removal, and listing of various resources
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Subversion (software)
Apache Subversion (often abbreviated SVN, after its command name svn) is a software versioning and revision control system distributed as open source under the Apache License.[2] Software developers use Subversion to maintain current and historical versions of files such as source code, web pages, and documentation. Its goal is to be a mostly compatible successor to the widely used Concurrent Versions System (CVS). The open source community has used Subversion widely: for example, in projects such as Apache Software Foundation, Free Pascal, FreeBSD, SourceForge, and from 2006 to 2019, GCC
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]