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HMS Nile
Three ships of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
have borne the name HMS Nile, after the Battle of the Nile
Battle of the Nile
in 1798:HMS Nile (1806) was a 12-gun cutter purchased in 1806. This may have been the former hired armed cutter Nile. HMS Nile was put up for sale in October 1810,[1] and sold, but the purchaser rejected her; she was subsequently broken up in 1811. HMS Nile (1839) was a 92-gun second-rate ship of the line launched in 1839
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Royal Navy
The Royal Navy
Navy
(RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War
Hundred Years War
against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy
Navy
traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service. From the middle decades of the 17th century, and through the 18th century, the Royal Navy
Navy
vied with the Dutch Navy
Navy
and later with the French Navy
Navy
for maritime supremacy. From the mid 18th century, it was the world's most powerful navy until surpassed by the United States Navy
Navy
during the Second World War
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Alexandria
Alexandria
Alexandria
(/ˌælɪɡˈzændriə/ or /-ˈzɑːnd-/;[3] Arabic: الإسكندرية al-ʾIskandariyya; Egyptian Arabic: إسكندرية Eskendria; Coptic: Ⲁⲗⲉⲝⲁⲛⲇⲣⲓⲁ, Ⲣⲁⲕⲟⲧⲉ Alexandria, Rakotə) is the second-largest city in Egypt
Egypt
and a major economic centre, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
in the north central part of the country. Its low elevation on the Nile delta
Nile delta
makes it highly vulnerable to rising sea levels. Alexandria
Alexandria
is an important industrial center because of its natural gas and oil pipelines from Suez. Alexandria
Alexandria
is also a popular tourist destination. Alexandria
Alexandria
was founded around a small, ancient Egyptian town c. 331 BC by Alexander the Great
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OCLC
OCLC, Inc., d/b/a OCLC[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio
Ohio
College Library Center, then became the Online Computer Library Center as it expanded. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Ships Of The Royal Navy
Ships of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
is a naval history reference work by J. J. Colledge (1908-1997); it provides brief entries on all recorded ships in commission in the British Royal Navy
Royal Navy
from the 15th century, giving location of constructions, date of launch, tonnage, specification and fate. It was published in two volumes by Greenhill Books. Volume 1, first published in 1969, covers major ships; Volume 2, first published in 1970, covers Navy-built trawlers, drifters, tugs and requisitioned ships including Armed Merchant Cruisers. The book is the standard single-volume reference work on ships of the Royal Navy, and Colledge's conventions and spellings of names are used by museums, libraries and archives. For more data on the ships of the pre-1863 British Navy, see British Warships in the Age of Sail. A revised third version of the Volume 1 work was published in 2003 which added the ships of the late 20th century
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J. J. Colledge
James Joseph Colledge (1908 – 26 April 1997)[1] was a British naval historian, author of Ships of the Royal Navy, the standard work on the fighting ships of the British Royal Navy
Royal Navy
from the 15th century to the 20th century. He also wrote Warships of World War II with Henry Trevor Lenton, listing Royal and Commonwealth warships. References[edit]^ World Ship Society obituary Archived 2011-09-30 at the Wayback Machine.External links[edit]Works by or about J. J. Colledge in libraries ( WorldCat
WorldCat
catalog)Authority control WorldCat
WorldCat
Identities VIAF: 62789134 ISNI: 0000 0000 6331 3777This article about a British historian or genealogist is a stub
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The London Gazette
The London Gazette
The London Gazette
is one of the official journals of record or Government gazettes of the British government, and the most important among such official journals in the United Kingdom, in which certain statutory notices are required to be published. The London Gazette claims to be the oldest surviving English newspaper and the oldest continuously published newspaper in the UK, having been first published on 7 November 1665 as The Oxford
Oxford
Gazette.[note 1][2] This claim is also made by the Stamford Mercury (1712) and Berrow's Worcester Journal
Berrow's Worcester Journal
(1690), because The Gazette is not a conventional newspaper offering general news coverage
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Lugger
A lugger is a class of boat, widely used as traditional fishing boats, particularly off the coasts of France, England and Scotland. It is a small sailing vessel with lug sails set on two or more masts and perhaps lug topsails.Contents1 The name 2 Local types 3 References 4 See also 5 Further reading 6 External linksThe name[edit]A French lugger, beached and drying nets. The lugsail is spread on the beach. She is beached stern first as is normal. In beach-launched boats, the bow is designed to rise to surf without shipping water or broaching
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Egypt
Coordinates: 26°N 30°E / 26°N 30°E / 26; 30Arab Republic
Republic
of Egyptجمهورية مصر العربيةArabic: Jumhūrīyat Miṣr al-ʿArabīyahEgyptian: Gomhoreyet Maṣr El ʿArabeyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Bilady, Bilady, Bilady" "بلادي، بلادي، بلادي" "My country, my country, my country"Capital and largest city Cairo 30°2′N 31°13′E / 30.033°N 31.217°E / 30.033; 31.217Official languages Arabic[a]National language Egyptian ArabicReligion90% Islam 9% Orthodox Christian 1% Other Christian[1]Demonym EgyptianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic• PresidentAbdel Fattah el-Sisi• Prime MinisterSherif IsmailLegislature House of RepresentativesEstablishment• Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt[2][3][b]c
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Ironclad
An ironclad is a steam-propelled warship protected by iron or steel armor plates used in the early part of the second half of the 19th century.[1] The ironclad was developed as a result of the vulnerability of wooden warships to explosive or incendiary shells. The first ironclad battleship, Gloire, was launched by the French Navy in November 1859.[2] The British Admiralty
Admiralty
had been considering armored warships since 1856 and prepared a draft design for an armored corvette in 1857; in early 1859 the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
started building two iron-hulled armored frigates, and by 1861 had made the decision to move to an all-armored battle fleet. After the first clashes of ironclads (both with wooden ships and with one another) took place in 1862 during the American Civil War, it became clear that the ironclad had replaced the unarmored ship of the line as the most powerful warship afloat
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Ship Of The Line
A ship of the line was a type of naval warship constructed from the 17th through to the mid-19th century to take part in the naval tactic known as the line of battle, in which two columns of opposing warships would manoeuvre to bring the greatest weight of broadside firepower to bear. Since these engagements were almost invariably won by the heaviest ships carrying the most powerful guns, the natural progression was to build sailing vessels that were the largest and most powerful of their time.[citation needed] From the end of the 1840s, the introduction of steam power brought less dependence on the wind in battle and led to the construction of screw-driven, wooden-hulled, ships of the line; a number of pure sail-driven ships were converted to this propulsion mechanism. However, the introduction of the ironclad frigate in about 1859 led swiftly to the decline of the steam-assisted ships of the line
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Second-rate
In the rating system of the British Royal Navy used to categorise sailing warships, a second-rate was a ship of the line which by the start of the 18th century mounted 90 to 98 guns on three gun decks; earlier 17th-century second rates had fewer guns and were originally two-deckers or had only partially armed third gun decks. They were essentially smaller and hence cheaper versions of the three-decker first rates. Like the first rates, they fought in the line of battle, but unlike the first rates, which were considered too valuable to risk in distant stations, the second rates often served also in major overseas stations as flagships. They had a reputation for poor handling and slow sailing
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Hired Armed Vessels
During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries the British Royal Navy made use of a considerable number of hired armed vessels. These were generally smaller vessels, often cutters and luggers, that the Navy used for duties ranging from carrying despatches and passengers to convoy escort, particularly in British coastal waters, and reconnaissance.[1]Contents1 Doctrine 2 Numbers and types 3 Service records 4 Letters of marque 5 Arming of merchantmen 6 Citations and references 7 External source 8 See alsoDoctrine[edit] The Navy Board
Navy Board
usually hired the vessel complete with master and crew rather than bareboat
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Cutter (ship)
A cutter is typically a small, but in some cases a medium-sized, watercraft designed for speed rather than for capacity.[1][2] Traditionally a cutter sailing vessel is a small single-masted boat, fore-and-aft rigged, with two or more headsails and often a bowsprit. The cutter's mast may be set farther back than on a sloop.[3] In modern usage, a cutter can be either a small- or medium-sized vessel whose occupants exercise official authority. Examples are harbor pilots' cutters and cutters of the U.S. Coast Guard[4] or UK Border Force. Cutters can also be a small boat serving a larger one to ferry passengers or light stores between larger boats and the shore. This type of cutter may be powered by oars, sails or a motor.[clarification needed]Contents1 Sailing 2 Rowing 3 Pulling 4 Naval cutter 5 Pilot cutter 6 Customs services 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksSailing[edit]French cutterThe cutter is one of several types of sailboats
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