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HK417
The Heckler & Koch HK417 is a battle rifle designed and manufactured by Heckler & Koch in Germany. It is the larger caliber version of the HK416, and chambered for the full-power 7.62×51mm NATO
7.62×51mm NATO
rifle cartridge. It is a gas-operated, selective fire rifle with a rotating bolt. The HK417 is intended for use in roles where the greater penetrative power and range of the 7.62×51mm cartridge are required. It has been adopted for service by a number of armed forces, special forces, and police organizations.Contents1 Design and features 2 Use 3 Variants3.1 Military
Military
and law enforcement3.1.1 G28 3.1.2 M110A13.2 Civilian4 Users 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDesign and features[edit] The HK417 is similar in internal design to the HK416, although the receiver and working parts are enlarged to suit the larger 7.62×51mm cartridge
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Battle Rifle
"Battle rifle" is a post-World War II term for military service rifles that are fed ammunition via detachable magazines and fire a full-powered rifle cartridge.[1] The term "battle rifle" was created largely out of a need to better differentiate the intermediate-power assault rifles (e.g. StG-44, AK-47
AK-47
and M16) from full-powered automatic rifles (e.g
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Suppressor
A silencer, suppressor, sound suppressor, or sound moderator is a device that reduces the sound intensity and muzzle flash when a firearm or air gun is discharged. It can be a detachable accessory to, or an integral part of, the muzzle or barrel. Typical silencers are a metal cylinder with internal baffle that slow and cool the escaping propellant gas, which decreases both sound volume and muzzle blast.[1] A flash suppressor, on the other hand, specifically cools or disperses burning gases typically exiting from the muzzle of a carbine-length weapon, without reference to sound reduction. In most countries, silencers are regulated along with firearms
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Intermediate Cartridge
An intermediate cartridge is a rifle/carbine cartridge that is less powerful than typical full-power battle rifle cartridges (such as the .303 British, 7.62×54mmR, 7.92×57mm Mauser, .30-06 Springfield
.30-06 Springfield
or 7.62×51mm NATO), but still has significantly longer effective range than pistol/personal defense weapon cartridges.[1] As their recoil is significantly reduced compared to full-power rifle cartridges, fully automatic rifles firing intermediate cartridges are relatively easy to control. However, even though less powerful than a traditional full-power rifle cartridge, the ballistics are still sufficient for an effective range of 300–600 metres (330–660 yd), which are the maximum typical engagement ranges in modern combat
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5.56×45mm NATO
The 5.5 6×45mm
6×45mm
NATO
NATO
(official NATO
NATO
nomenclature 5.56 NATO) is a rimless bottlenecked intermediate cartridge family developed in Belgium by FN Herstal.[4] It consists of the SS109, SS110, and SS111 cartridges
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German Army
General
General
Ulrich de Maizière General
General
Ernst Ferber, COMAFCENT 1973–1975 Lieutenant General
Lieutenant General
Jörg Schönbohm, later Undersecretary of DefenseThe German Army
Army
(German: Deutsches Heer) is the land component of the armed forces of Germany. The present-day German Army
Army
was founded in 1955 as part of the newly formed West German Bundeswehr
Bundeswehr
together with the Marine (German Navy) and the Luftwaffe (German Air Force)
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Milliradian
A milliradian, often called a mil or mrad, is an SI derived unit
SI derived unit
for angular measurement which is defined as a thousandth of a radian (0.001 radian). Mils are used in adjustment of firearm sights by adjusting the angle of the sight compared to the barrel (up, down, left or right). Mils are also used for comparing shot groupings, or to compare the difficulty of hitting different sized shooting targets at different distances. When using a scope with both mil adjustment and a reticle with mil markings (called a mil/mil scope), the shooter can use the reticle as a "ruler" to count the number of mils a shot was off target which directly translates to the sight adjustment needed to hit the target with a follow up shot
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Match Grade
Match grade
Match grade
frequently refers to quality firearm parts and ammunition that are suitable for a competitive match. Sometimes it also refers to other devices and parts that are made with high precision in mind. Description[edit] In firearms, the term is used to refer to ammunition and gun parts that are designed and manufactured in such a way that they have a relatively narrow tolerance and high level of accuracy. No standards are defined for its qualification[1] and as such it is more of a relative term. In addition to its use in shooting sports, match grade equipment is often employed by military and law enforcement sharpshooters. Thus, many gun manufacturers use the term "match grade" to describe their products
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Rifling
In firearms, rifling is the helical groove pattern that is machined into the internal (bore) surface of a gun's barrel, for the purpose of exerting torque and thus imparting a spin to a projectile around its longitudinal axis during shooting. This spin serves to gyroscopically stabilize the projectile by conservation of angular momentum, improving its aerodynamic stability and accuracy over smoothbore designs. Rifling
Rifling
is often described by its twist rate, which indicates the distance the rifling takes to complete one full revolution, such as "1 turn in 10 inches" (1:10 inches), or "1 turn in 254 mm" (1:254 mm)
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Flash Suppressor
A flash suppressor, also known as a flash guard, flash eliminator, flash hider, or flash cone, is a device attached to the muzzle of a rifle that reduces its visible signature while firing by cooling or dispersing the burning gases that exit the muzzle, a phenomenon typical of carbine-length weapons. Its primary intent is to reduce the chances that the shooter will be blinded in low-light shooting conditions. Contrary to popular belief, it is only a minor secondary benefit if a flash suppressor reduces the intensity of the flash visible to the enemy.[1] A flash suppressor is different from a muzzle brake, although they are typically mounted in the same position and sometimes confused with each other
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Bundeswehr
The Bundeswehr
Bundeswehr
(German: [ˈbʊndəsˌveːɐ̯] ( listen), Federal Defence) is the unified armed forces of Germany
Germany
and their civil administration and procurement authorities. The States of Germany
Germany
are not allowed to maintain armed forces of their own, since the German Constitution states that matters of defense fall into the sole responsibility of the federal government.[4] The Bundeswehr
Bundeswehr
is divided into a military part (armed forces or Streitkräfte) and a civil part with the armed forces administration (Wehrverwaltung)
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Direct Impingement
Direct impingement
Direct impingement
is a type of gas operation for a firearm that directs gas from a fired cartridge directly into the bolt carrier or slide assembly to cycle the action.Contents1 Evaluation 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 SourcesEvaluation[edit]This article may lend undue weight to certain ideas, incidents, or controversies. Please help to create a more neutral presentation, with details put in their proper context. Discuss and resolve this issue before removing this message. (May 2016)Firearms featuring a direct impingement design tend to be lighter and shorter, but, are also dirtier, due to the exposure of the firearm's internal moving parts to fouling from cartridge propellant gases
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War In Afghanistan (2001–present)
ISAF phase (2001–14): Islamic Republic of Afghanistan[7] ISAF  United States  United Kingdom  Italy  Germany  Georgia  Jordan  Turkey  Bulgaria  Poland  Romania  Spain  Australia  Czech RepublicContinued list[a] Macedonia  Denmark  Armenia  Azerbaijan  Finland  France  Croatia  Hungary  Norway  Lithuania  Mongolia  United Arab Emirates  Belgium  Portugal  Slovakia  Netherlands  Montenegro  Latvia  Sweden  Albania  Ukraine  Bosnia and Herzegovina  Greece  Ireland  Iceland  Estonia  Malaysia  Slovenia  Austria  Bahrain  El Salvador  Luxembourg  New Zealand  South Korea  Tonga Canada  Pakistan[8]  
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Steel
Steel
Steel
is an alloy of iron and carbon and other elements. Because of its high tensile strength and low cost, it is a major component used in buildings, infrastructure, tools, ships, automobiles, machines, appliances, and weapons. Iron
Iron
is the base metal of steel. Iron
Iron
is able to take on two crystalline forms (allotropic forms), body centered cubic (BCC) and face centered cubic (FCC), depending on its temperature. In the body-centred cubic arrangement, there is an iron atom in the centre of each cube, and in the face-centred cubic, there is one at the center of each of the six faces of the cube
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Aluminium Alloy
Aluminium
Aluminium
alloys (or aluminum alloys; see spelling differences) are alloys in which aluminium (Al) is the predominant metal. The typical alloying elements are copper, magnesium, manganese, silicon, tin and zinc. There are two principal classifications, namely casting alloys and wrought alloys, both of which are further subdivided into the categories heat-treatable and non-heat-treatable. About 85% of aluminium is used for wrought products, for example rolled plate, foils and extrusions. Cast aluminium alloys yield cost-effective products due to the low melting point, although they generally have lower tensile strengths than wrought alloys. The most important cast aluminium alloy system is Al–Si, where the high levels of silicon (4.0–13%) contribute to give good casting characteristics
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