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HDCP
High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) is a form of digital copy protection developed by Intel
Intel
Corporation[1] to prevent copying of digital audio & video content as it travels across connections. Types of connections include DisplayPort
DisplayPort
(DP), Digital Visual Interface (DVI), and High-Definition Multimedia Interface
High-Definition Multimedia Interface
(HDMI), as well as less popular or now deprecated protocols like Gigabit Video Interface (GVIF) and Unified Display Interface (UDI). The system is meant to stop HDCP-encrypted content from being played on unauthorized devices or devices which have been modified to copy HDCP content.[2][3] Before sending data, a transmitting device checks that the receiver is authorized to receive it
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Copy Protection
Copy protection, also known as content protection, copy prevention and copy restriction, is any effort designed to prevent the reproduction of software, films, music, and other media, usually for copyright reasons.[1] Various methods have been devised to prevent reproduction so that companies will gain benefit from each person who obtains an authorized copy of their product. Unauthorized copying and distribution accounted for $2.4 billion in lost revenue in the United States alone in the 1990s,[2] and is assumed to be causing impact on revenues in the music and the game industry, leading to proposal of stricter copyright laws such as PIPA. Some methods of copy protection have also led to criticisms because it caused inconvenience for honest consumers, or it secretly installed additional or unwanted software to detect copying activities on the consumer's computer
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Ruhr-Universität Bochum
The Ruhr- University
University
Bochum
Bochum
(German: Ruhr-Universität Bochum, RUB), located on the southern hills of central Ruhr area
Ruhr area
Bochum, was founded in 1962 as the first new public university in Germany
Germany
after World War II. Instruction began in 1965. The Ruhr- University
University
Bochum
Bochum
is one of the largest universities in Germany
Germany
and part of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, the most important German research funding organization.[9] The RUB was very successful in the Excellence Initiative of the German Federal and State Governments (2007), a competition between Germany's most prestigious universities. It was one of the few institutions left competing for the title of an "elite university", but did not succeed in the last round of the competition
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United States Congress
535 voting members100 senators 435 representatives6 non-voting membersSenate political groups     Republican (51)      Democratic (47)      Independent (2) (caucusing with Democrats)House of Representatives political groups     Republican (238)      Democratic (193)      Vacant (4)ElectionsSenate last electionNovember 8, 2016House of Representatives last electionNovember 8, 2016Meeting place United States
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Windows Vista
Windows Vista
Windows Vista
(codenamed Longhorn[7]) is an operating system by Microsoft
Microsoft
for use on personal computers, including home and business desktops, laptops, tablet PCs and media center PCs. Development was completed on 8 November 2006,[2] and over the following three months, it was released in stages to computer hardware and software manufacturers, business customers and retail channels. On 30 January 2007, it was released worldwide[3] and was made available for purchase and download from the Windows Marketplace.[8] The release of Windows Vista came more than five years after the introduction of its predecessor, Windows XP, the longest time span between successive releases of Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows desktop operating systems
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Windows 7
Windows 7
Windows 7
(codenamed Vienna, formerly Blackcomb[7]) is a personal computer operating system developed by Microsoft. It is a part of the Windows NT
Windows NT
family of operating systems. Windows 7
Windows 7
was released to manufacturing on July 22, 2009 and became generally available on October 22, 2009,[8] less than three years after the release of its predecessor, Windows Vista
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Carnegie Mellon University
Coordinates: 40°26′36″N 79°56′37″W / 40.443322°N 79.943583°W / 40.443322; -79.943583 Carnegie Mellon University
Carnegie Mellon University
(Carnegie Mellon or CMU /ˈkɑːrnɪɡi ˈmɛlən/ or /kɑːrˈneɪɡi ˈmɛlən/) is a private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Founded in 1900 by Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
as the Carnegie Technical Schools, the university became the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1912 and began granting four-year degrees. In 1967, the Carnegie Institute of Technology merged with the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research
Mellon Institute of Industrial Research
to form Carnegie Mellon University. The university's 140-acre (57 ha) main campus is 3 miles (5 km) from Downtown Pittsburgh
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Ian Goldberg
Ian Avrum Goldberg (born March 31, 1973) is a cryptographer and cypherpunk. He is best known for breaking Netscape's implementation of SSL (with David Wagner),[1] and for his role as chief scientist of Radialpoint (formerly Zero Knowledge Systems), a Canadian software company. Goldberg is currently a professor at the School of Computer Science, University of Waterloo. He was formerly Tor Project board of directors chairman,[2] and is one of the designers of off the record messaging.[3]Contents1 Education 2 Accomplishments 3 Work in cryptography 4 See also 5 Notes and references 6 External linksEducation[edit] He attended high school at the University of Toronto Schools, graduating in 1991. In 1995, he received a B.Math from the University of Waterloo in pure mathematics and computer science. He obtained a Ph.D
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David A. Wagner
David A. Wagner
David A. Wagner
(born 1974) is a Professor
Professor
of Computer Science
Computer Science
at the University of California, Berkeley
University of California, Berkeley
and a well-known researcher in cryptography and computer security. He is a member of the Election Assistance Commission's Technical Guidelines Development Committee, tasked with assisting the EAC in drafting the Voluntary Voting System Guidelines. He is also a member of the ACCURATE
ACCURATE
project. Wagner received an A.B. in Mathematics
Mathematics
from Princeton University
Princeton University
in 1995, an M.S
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Digital Millennium Copyright Act
The Digital Millennium Copyright
Copyright
Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law that implements two 1996 treaties of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). It criminalizes production and dissemination of technology, devices, or services intended to circumvent measures that control access to copyrighted works (commonly known as digital rights management or DRM). It also criminalizes the act of circumventing an access control, whether or not there is actual infringement of copyright itself
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Engadget
Engadget
Engadget
is a multilingual technology blog network with daily coverage of gadgets and consumer electronics. Engadget
Engadget
currently operates a total of ten blogs—four written in English and six international versions with independent editorial staff
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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Twitter
Twitter
Twitter
(/ˈtwɪtər/) is an online news and social networking service on which users post and interact with messages known as "tweets". Tweets were originally restricted to 140 characters, but on November 7, 2017, this limit was doubled for all languages except Japanese, Korean, and Chinese.[11] Registered users can post tweets, but those who are unregistered can only read them. Users access Twitter
Twitter
through its website interface, through Short Message Service
Short Message Service
(SMS) or mobile-device application software ("app").[12] Twitter, Inc. is based in San Francisco, California, and has more than 25 offices around the world.[13] Twitter
Twitter
was created in March 2006 by Jack Dorsey, Noah Glass, Biz Stone, and Evan Williams and launched in July of that year. The service rapidly gained worldwide popularity
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Pastebin
A pastebin or text storage site[1][2][3] is a type of online content hosting service where users can store plain text, e.g. to source code snippets for code review via Internet Relay Chat
Internet Relay Chat
(IRC). The first pastebin was the eponymous pastebin.com. Other sites with the same functionality have appeared, and several open-source pastebin scripts are available. Pastebins may allow commenting where readers can post feedback directly on the page. GitHub
GitHub
Gists are a type of pastebin with version control. History[edit] Pastebins developed in the late 1990s to facilitate IRC chatrooms devoted to computing,[citation needed] where users naturally needed to share large blocks of computer input or output in a line-oriented medium. On such IRC channels, where the formatting clues are subtle and several conversations can be closely interleaved, blocks of computer data flood the queue, disrupting the intricate flow
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Xor
but not is Venn diagram
Venn diagram
of A ⊕ B ⊕ C displaystyle scriptstyle Aoplus Boplus C   ⊕   displaystyle ~oplus ~   ⇔   displaystyle ~Leftrightarrow ~ Exclusive or
Exclusive or
or exclusive disjunction is a logical operation that outputs true only when inputs differ (one is true, the other is false).[1] It is symbolized by the prefix operator J[2] and by the infix operators XOR (/ˌɛks ˈɔːr/), EOR, EXOR, ⊻, ⩒, ⩛, ⊕, ↮, and ≢. The negation of XOR is logical biconditional, which outputs true only when both inputs are the same. It gains the name "exclusive or" because the meaning of "or" is ambiguous when both operands are true; the exclusive or operator excludes that case. This is sometimes thought of as "one or the other but not both"
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Breaking Bad
Breaking Bad
Breaking Bad
is an American neo-western crime drama television series created and produced by Vince Gilligan. The show originally aired on the AMC network for five seasons, from January 20, 2008 to September 29, 2013. It tells the story of Walter White (Bryan Cranston), a struggling high school chemistry teacher diagnosed with lung cancer. Together with his former student Jesse Pinkman
Jesse Pinkman
(Aaron Paul), White turns to a life of crime by producing and selling crystallized methamphetamine to secure his family's financial future before he dies, while navigating the dangers of the criminal world. The title comes from the Southern colloquialism "breaking bad", meaning to "raise hell" or turn toward crime.[5] Breaking Bad
Breaking Bad
is set and filmed in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Walter's family consists of his wife Skyler (Anna Gunn) and children, Walter, Jr. (RJ Mitte) and Holly (Elanor Anne Wenrich)
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