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Gyeonggi-do
Gyeonggi-do (Hangul: 경기도, Korean pronunciation: [kjʌŋ.ɡi.do]) is the most populous province in South Korea. Its name, Gyeonggi means "the area surrounding capital". Thus Gyeonggi-do can be translated as "province surrounding Seoul". The provincial capital is Suwon. Seoul—South Korea's largest city and national capital—is in the heart of the province but has been separately administered as a provincial-level special city since 1946. Incheon—South Korea's third-largest city—is on the coast of the province and has been similarly administered as a provincial-level metropolitan city since 1981
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Goguryeo
Goguryeo
Goguryeo
(고구려; 高句麗; [ko.ɡu.ɾjʌ], 37 BCE[note 1]–668 CE), also called Goryeo
Goryeo
(고려; 高麗; [ko.ɾjʌ]) was a Korean kingdom[3][4][5][6][7] located in the northern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula
Korean Peninsula
and the southern and central parts of Manchuria. Along with Baekje
Baekje
and Silla, Goguryeo
Goguryeo
was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea
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Taejo Of Goryeo
Taejo of Goryeo
Goryeo
(31 January 877 – 4 July 943), also known as Taejo Wang Geon (Wang Kǒn, 왕건), was the founder of the Goryeo
Goryeo
dynasty, which ruled Korea
Korea
from the 10th to the 14th century. Taejo ruled from 918 to 943, achieving unification of the Later Three Kingdoms in 936.Contents1 Background 2 Rise to power 3 Rise to the throne and founding of Goryeo 4 The War of the Later Three Kingdoms 5 Goryeo
Goryeo
victory and unification 6 Legacy 7 Family 8 Popular culture 9 Notes 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksBackground[edit] Wang Geon was born in 877 to a powerful maritime merchant family based in Songak (modern Kaesong) as the eldest son of Wang Ryung (Hangul: 왕륭; Hanja: 王隆)
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Baekje
Baekje
Baekje
(백제; 百濟; [pɛk̚.t͈ɕe]; 18 BC[1] – 660 AD) was a kingdom located in southwest Korea. It was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo
Goguryeo
and Silla. Baekje
Baekje
was founded by Onjo, the third son of Goguryeo's founder Jumong and So Seo-no, at Wiryeseong
Wiryeseong
(present-day southern Seoul). Baekje, like Goguryeo, claimed to succeed Buyeo, a state established in present-day Manchuria
Manchuria
around the time of Gojoseon's fall. Baekje
Baekje
alternately battled and allied with Goguryeo
Goguryeo
and Silla
Silla
as the three kingdoms expanded control over the peninsula
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Wiryeseong
Coordinates: 37°31′50.25″N 127°7′0.62″E / 37.5306250°N 127.1168389°E / 37.5306250; 127.1168389WiryeseongThe remains of Pungnap Toseong, located in Songpa-gu, Seoul, which is widely believed to be the site of Wiryeseong
Wiryeseong
(May 2004).Korean nameHangul 위례성Hanja 慰禮城Revised Romanization WiryeseongMcCune–Reischauer Wiryesŏng Wiryeseong
Wiryeseong
was the name of two early capitals of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. Both are believed to have been in the modern-day Seoul
Seoul
area
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Han River (Korea)
The Han River or Hangang (Korean pronunciation: [ha(ː)n.ɡaŋ])[d] is a major river in South Korea and the fourth longest river on the Korean peninsula after the Amnok (Yalu), Tuman (Tumen), and Nakdong rivers.[7] The river begins as two smaller rivers in the eastern mountains of the Korean peninsula, which then converge near Seoul, the capital of the country. The Han River and its surrounding area have played an important role in Korean history. The Three Kingdoms of Korea
Three Kingdoms of Korea
strove to take control of this land, where the river was used as a trade route to China (via the Yellow Sea). However, the river is no longer actively used for navigation, because its estuary is located at the borders of the two Koreas, barred for entrance by any civilian. The river serves as a water source for over 12 million Koreans
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Silla
Silla
Silla
(57 BC[note 1] – 935 AD) (Hangul: 신라; Hanja: 新羅; RR:  Silla
Silla
Korean pronunciation: [ɕil.la]) was a kingdom located in southern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula. Silla, along with Baekje
Baekje
and Goguryeo, formed the Three Kingdoms of Korea. Founded by Hyeokgeose of Silla, the dynasty was ruled by the Gyeongju Gim (Kim) (김, 金) clan for most of its 992-year history. It began as a chiefdom in the Samhan
Samhan
confederacies, once allied with China, until it eventually conquered the other two kingdoms, Baekje
Baekje
in 660 and Goguryeo
Goguryeo
in 668. Thereafter, Later Silla
Later Silla
occupied most of the Korean Peninsula, while the northern part re-emerged as Balhae, a successor-state of Goguryeo
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Jinheung Of Silla
Jinheung of Silla
Silla
(526 – 576; reign 540 – 576) was the 24th monarch of Silla,[1] one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. He followed King Beopheung (r. 514–540) and was followed by King Jinji (r. 576–579). Jinheung was the nephew / grandson of King Beopheung. King Jinheung
King Jinheung
was one of the greatest kings of Silla, and was responsible for expanding Silla
Silla
territory immensely. He and King Seong 26th king of Baekje, struggled with each other over the Han River valley. Jinheung won this struggle and expanded Silla's territory immensely.Contents1 Rise to the throne 2 Expansion 3 Death and succession 4 Family 5 Legacy 6 Popular culture 7 See also 8 ReferencesRise to the throne[edit] King Jinheung
King Jinheung
of Silla
Silla
rose to the throne at a young age when his predecessor and paternal uncle / maternal grandfather, Beopheung, died
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Later Silla
Later Silla
Silla
(668–935, Hangul: 후신라; Hanja: 後新羅; RR: Husilla, Korean pronunciation: [huː.ɕil.la]) or Unified Silla
Silla
(Hangul: 통일신라; Hanja: 統一新羅, Korean pronunciation: [tʰoːŋ.il.ɕil.la]) is the name often applied to the Korean kingdom of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, after it conquered Baekje
Baekje
and Goguryeo
Goguryeo
in the 7th century, unifying the central and southern regions of the Korean peninsula. Later Silla
Silla
was a prosperous and wealthy country,[2] and its metropolitan capital of Seorabeol
Seorabeol
(modern name Gyeongju)[3] was the fourth-largest city in the world at the time.[4][5][6][7] During its heyday, the country contested with Balhae, a Goguryeo–Mohe kingdom, to the north for supremacy in the region
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Goryeo
Gaegyeong (919–1232, 1270–1390, 1391-1392) Ganghwa (1232–1270) Namgyeong (1390-1391)Languages Middle KoreanReligion Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shamanism (Sindo)Government MonarchyKing •  918–943 Taejo (first) •  949–975 Gwangjong •  981–997 Seongjong •  1046–1083 Munjong •  1351–1374 Gongmin •  1389–1392 Gongyang (last)Military regime leader •  1170-1174 Yi Ui-bang (first) •  1174–1179 Jeong Jung-bu •  1196–1219 Choe Chung-heon •  1270 Im Yu-mu (last)History • 
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Hyeonjong Of Goryeo
Hyeonjong of Goryeo
Goryeo
(1 August 992 – 17 June 1031, r. 1009–1031) was the 8th ruler of the Goryeo
Goryeo
dynasty of Korea. He was a grandson of King Taejo. He was appointed by the military leader Gang Jo, whom the previous King Mokjong had called upon to destroy a plot by Kim Chi-yang. In 1010, The Khitan attacked again during an internal Goryeo
Goryeo
power struggle. Hyeonjong was forced to flee the capital temporarily, Hyeonjong directed the court to move far south to the port city of Naju. But Goryeo
Goryeo
repulsed the khitan attack. Finally, Khitan forces withdrew. In 1019, when Goryeo
Goryeo
continued to refuse to submit or return the northern territories, the Khitan attacked once more. Goryeo
Goryeo
generals, including Gang Gam-chan, were able to inflict heavy losses on the Khitan army in the Battle of Kwiju
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Three Kingdoms Of Korea
The concept of the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
of Korea (Hangul: 삼국시대) refers to the three kingdoms of Baekje
Baekje
(백제), Silla
Silla
(신라) and Goguryeo
Goguryeo
(고구려). Goguryeo
Goguryeo
was later known as Goryeo
Goryeo
(고려), from which the modern name Korea is derived. The Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period was defined as being from 57 BC to 668 AD (but there existed about 78 tribal states in the southern region of Korean peninsula and relatively big states like Okjeo, Buyeo, and Dongye
Dongye
in its northern part and Manchuria). The three kingdoms occupied the entire Korean Peninsula
Korean Peninsula
and most of Manchuria, located in present-day China
China
and Russia
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Joseon
The Joseon
Joseon
dynasty (also transcribed as Chosŏn or Chosun, Korean: 조선; also known as Joseon
Joseon
of the House of Yi, Korean: 리조조선; officially the Kingdom of Great Joseon, Korean: 대조선국) was a Korean dynastic kingdom that lasted for approximately five centuries. It was founded by Yi Seong-gye
Yi Seong-gye
in July 1392 and was replaced by the Korean Empire
Korean Empire
in October 1897.[5] It was founded following the aftermath of the overthrow of Goryeo
Goryeo
in what is today the city of Kaesong. Early on, Korea
Korea
was retitled and the capital was relocated to modern-day Seoul. The kingdom's northernmost borders were expanded to the natural boundaries at the rivers of Amnok and Tuman through the subjugation of the Jurchens
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Sejong The Great
Sejong the Great
Sejong the Great
(Korean pronunciation: [se(ː)dʑoŋ]; 7 May 1397 – 8 April 1450) was the fourth king of Joseon-dynasty Korea. He was the third son of King Taejong and Queen consort Min. He was designated as heir-apparent, Crown Prince, after his older brother Jae was stripped of his title. He ascended to the throne in 1418. During the first four years of his reign, Taejong governed as regent, after which his father-in-law, Sim On, and his close associates were executed. Sejong reinforced Confucian policies and executed major "legal amendments" (공법; 貢法). He also personally created and promulgated the Korean alphabet Hangul,[2] encouraged advancements of scientific technology, and instituted many other efforts to stabilize and improve prosperity. He dispatched military campaigns to the north and instituted the Samin Policy (사민정책; 徙民政策) to attract new settlers to the region
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Chungju
Chungju
Chungju
(Korean pronunciation: [tɕʰuŋ.dʑu]) is a city in North Chungcheong province, South Korea. Namsan is a mountain located within the outskirts of the city. The city is famous for the annual martial arts festival held in October. Also of note, UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon
Ban Ki-moon
grew up here.Contents1 Symbol 2 History 3 Chungju
Chungju
Lake3.1 2013 World Rowing Championships4 Products 5 Education 6 Climate 7 Sister cities 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksSymbol[edit]City Flower : Chrysanthemum City Bird : Mandarin duck City Tree : Apple treeHistory[edit] During Hideyoshi's Invasions of Korea Chungju
Chungju
was the site of the Battle of Chungju, where the Korean general Shin Rip was defeated by the Japanese general Konishi Yukinaga
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Gongju
Gongju
Gongju
((Korean pronunciation: [koŋ.dʑu]); Gongju-si), also spelt Kongju, is a city in South Chungcheong
South Chungcheong
province, South Korea.Contents1 History1.1 New capital2 Famous people 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Gongju
Gongju
around 1872Young trees, Kongju, 1908-1922 Gongju
Gongju
was formerly named Ungjin and was the capital of Baekje
Baekje
from AD 475 to 538
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