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Gustaf Kossinna
Gustaf Kossinna
Gustaf Kossinna
(28 September 1858 – 20 December 1931) was a German linguist and professor of German archaeology at the University of Berlin. Along with Carl Schuchhardt
Carl Schuchhardt
he was the most influential German prehistorian of his day, and was creator of the techniques of Siedlungsarchaeologie, or "settlement archaeology."[1] His nationalistic theories about the origins of the Germanic peoples influenced aspects of Nazi
Nazi
ideology; nevertheless, he was rejected by the party as their official prehistorian.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Material culture and ethnicity 3 Nationalistic use of archaeology 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingLife[edit] Kossinna was a Germanized Mazur. He was born in Tilsit, East Prussia, Kingdom of Prussia. His father was a teacher at the secondary-school level
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National Library Of The Czech Republic
6,919,075 total items[1] 21,204 manuscripts[1] c. 4,200 incunabula[2]Other informationDirector Martin KocandaWebsite www.nkp.czThe National Library of the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
(Czech: Národní knihovna České republiky) is the central library of the Czech Republic. It is directed by the Ministry of Culture. The library's main building is located in the historical Clementinum
Clementinum
building in Prague, where approximately half of its books are kept. The other half of the collection is stored in the district of Hostivař.[3] The National Library is the biggest library in the Czech Republic, in its funds there are around 6 million documents. The library has around 60,000 registered readers
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Versailles Conference
The Paris
Paris
Peace Conference, also known as Versailles Peace Conference, was the meeting of the victorious Allied Powers following the end of World War I
World War I
to set the peace terms for the defeated Central Powers. Involving diplomats from 32 countries and nationalities, the major or main decisions were the creation of the League of Nations, as well as the five peace treaties with the defeated states; the awarding of German and Ottoman overseas possessions as "mandates", chiefly to Britain and France; reparations imposed on Germany; and the drawing of new national boundaries (sometimes with plebiscites) to better reflect ethnic boundaries. The main result was the Treaty of Versailles
Treaty of Versailles
with Germany, which in section 231 laid the guilt for the war on "the aggression of Germany and her allies"
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Kingdom Of Prussia
The Kingdom of Prussia
Prussia
(German: Königreich Preußen) was a German kingdom that constituted the state of Prussia
Prussia
between 1701 and 1918 and included parts of present-day Germany, Poland, Russia, Lithuania, Denmark, Belgium
Belgium
and the Czech Republic.[3] It was the driving force behind the unification of Germany
Germany
in 1871 and was the leading state of the German Empire
German Empire
until its dissolution in 1918.[3] Although it took its name from the region called Prussia, it was based in the Margraviate of Brandenburg, where its capital was Berlin. The kings of Prussia
Prussia
were from the House of Hohenzollern
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Urheimat
In historical linguistics, the term homeland (also Urheimat /ˈʊərhaɪmɑːt/; German pronunciation: [ˈʔuːɐ̯ˌhaɪmaːt]; from a German compound of ur- "original" and Heimat "home, homeland") denotes the area of origin of the speakers of a proto-language, the (reconstructed or known) parent language of a group of languages assumed to be genetically related. Depending on the age of the language family under consideration, its homeland may be known with near-certainty (in the case of historical or near-historical migrations) or it may be very uncertain (in the case of deep prehistory)
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Schleswig-Holstein
Schleswig- Holstein
Holstein
(German: [ˈʃleːsvɪç ˈhɔlʃtaɪ̯n]; Danish: Slesvig-Holsten) is the northernmost of the 16 states of Germany, comprising most of the historical duchy of Holstein
Holstein
and the southern part of the former Duchy of Schleswig. Its capital city is Kiel; other notable cities are Lübeck
Lübeck
and Flensburg. Also known in more dated English as Sleswick-Holsatia, the Danish name is Slesvig-Holsten, the Low German
Low German
name is Sleswig-Holsteen, and the North Frisian name is Slaswik-Holstiinj
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Völkisch Movement
The völkisch movement ("folkish" movement), original name: völkische Bewegung, was the German interpretation of a populist movement, with a romantic focus on folklore and the "organic", i.e.: a "naturally grown community in unity", characterised by the one-body-metaphor (Volkskörper) for the entire population during a period from the late 19th century up until the Nazi era.Contents1 Translation 2 Origins in the 19th century 3 Before and after World War I 4 Influence on Nazism 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksTranslation[edit] The term völkisch (pronounced [ˈfœlkɪʃ]) derives from the German word Volk (cognate with the English "folk"), corresponding to "ethnic group" of a population and people, with connotations in German of "people-powered"
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Taphonomy
Taphonomy
Taphonomy
is the study of how organisms decay and become fossilized. The term taphonomy (from the Greek taphos, τάφος meaning "burial", and nomos, νόμος meaning "law") was introduced to paleontology in 1949[1] by Russian scientist Ivan Efremov to describe the study of the transition of remains, parts, or products of organisms from the biosphere to the lithosphere.[2][3]Contents1 Description 2 Research areas2.1 Paleontology 2.2 Astrobiology 2.3 Forensic science 2.4 Environmental archaeology3
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Madison Grant
Madison Grant
Madison Grant
(November 19, 1865 – May 30, 1937) was an American lawyer, writer, and zoologist known primarily for his work as a eugenicist and conservationist
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The Passing Of The Great Race
The Passing of the Great Race: Or, The Racial Basis of European History is a 1916 book by American eugenicist, lawyer, and amateur anthropologist Madison Grant. Though influential, the book was largely ignored when it first appeared; it went through several revisions and editions, but was never a best seller.[1] Grant expounds a theory of Nordic superiority and argues for a strong eugenics program. Grant's proposal to create a strong eugenics program for the Nordic population to survive was repudiated by Americans in the 1930s and Europeans after 1945. It is considered one of the main works in the 20th century tradition of scientific racism[citation needed] and has been described by pro-immigration advocate and Open Society Foundations contributor[2] Jonathan P
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March (territory)
A march or mark was, in broad terms, a medieval European term for any kind of borderland, as opposed to a notional "heartland". More specifically, a march was a border between realms, and/or a neutral/buffer zone under joint control of two states, in which different laws might apply. In both of these senses, marches served a political purpose, such as providing warning of military incursions, or regulating cross-border trade, or both. Just as counties were traditionally ruled by counts, marches gave rise to titles such as: marquess (masculine) or marchioness (feminine) in England, marquis (masc.) or marquise (fem.) in France and Scotland, margrave (Markgraf i.e. "march count"; masc.) or margravine (Markgräfin i.e
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Diffusionism
In cultural anthropology and cultural geography, cultural diffusion, as conceptualized by Leo Frobenius
Leo Frobenius
in his 1897/98 publication Der westafrikanische Kulturkreis, is the spread of cultural items—such as ideas, styles, religions, technologies, languages—between individuals, whether within a single culture or from one culture to another. It is distinct from the diffusion of innovations within a specific culture
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Frankish Language
Frankish (reconstructed Frankish: *Frenkisk),[2] Old Franconian or Old Frankish was the West Germanic language
West Germanic language
spoken by the Franks
Franks
between the 4th and 8th century. The language itself is poorly attested, but it gave rise to numerous loanwords in Old French. Old Dutch
Old Dutch
is the term for the Old Franconian dialects that were spoken in the Low Countries, including present-day Belgium, the Netherlands, and Western parts of today's Germany, until about the 12th century when it evolved into Middle Dutch. During the Merovingian period, Frankish had significant influence on the Romance languages
Romance languages
spoken in Gaul. As a result, many modern French words and placenames (including the country name "France") have a Germanic origin
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western)
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Napoleonic Wars
The Napoleonic Wars
Napoleonic Wars
(1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon
Napoleon
I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution
French Revolution
and its resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon; the Third Coalition
Third Coalition
(1805), the Fourth (1806–07), Fifth (1809), Sixth (1813), and the Seventh and final (1815). Napoleon, upon ascending to First Consul of France
France
in 1799, had inherited a chaotic republic; he subsequently created a state with stable finances, a strong bureaucracy, and a well-trained army
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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