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Gun Turret
A gun turret is a location from which weapons can be fired that affords protection, visibility, and some cone of fire. A modern gun turret is generally a weapon mount that houses the crew or mechanism of a projectile-firing weapon and at the same time lets the weapon be aimed and fired in some degree of azimuth and elevation (cone of fire).Contents1 Description1.1 Cupolas2 Warships2.1 History2.1.1 UK: first designs 2.1.2 United States: USS Monitor 2.1.3 Later designs2.2 Layout 2.3 Wing turrets 2.4 Modern turrets 2.5 Turret
Turret
identification3 Aircraft3.1 History 3.2 Layout 3.3 Gallery4 Combat vehicles4.1 History 4.2 Layout5 Land fortifications5.1 Gallery6 See also 7 Footnotes 8 References8.1 Bibliography9 External linksDescription[edit] Rotating gun turrets have the protection, the weapon, and its crew rotate
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French 100 Mm Naval Gun
17,000 m (elevation 40°) Maximum practical range:6,000 m against aerial targets 12,000 m against surface targetsModern French 100 mm naval guns are multipurpose artillery pieces (anti-air, anti-ship, ground), capable of a high rate of fire. Most modern French warships are/were equipped with one of its versions.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 Versions 4 Usage 5 External linksHistory[edit] At the end of the Second World War, the French Navy was equipped with guns of numerous calibres, most of which were obsolete. In 1953, the STCAN of Paris, under engineer Tonnelé, drafted the design of a multi-purpose 100 mm gun. The gun was designed to be effective foranti-air defence anti-ship combat ground shellingThe first model of the family, "modèle 53", was tested at sea on the escort Le Brestois in 1958 and the escort aviso Victor Schoelcher in 1961. Description[edit] The most common version, modèle 68, features a completely automatic action and control
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HMS Captain (1869)
HMS Captain was an unsuccessful warship built for the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
due to public pressure. She was a masted turret ship, designed and built by a private contractor against the wishes of the Controller's department. The Captain was completed in April 1870 and capsized in September 1870 with the loss of nearly 500 lives because of design and construction errors that led to inadequate stability.[2]Contents1 Background 2 Design and construction 3 Gunnery trials 4 Sinking 5 Court-martial 6 Memorials 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksBackground[edit] The history of the Captain can be traced back to the Crimean War
Crimean War
and the experiences of British captain Cowper Phipps Coles
Cowper Phipps Coles
in 1855
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Art And Engraving On United States Banknotes
In early 18th century Colonial America, engravers began experimenting with copper plates as an alternative medium to wood. Applied to the production of paper currency, copper-plate engraving allowed for greater detail and production during printing. It was the transition to steel engraving that enabled banknote design and printing to rapidly advance in the United States during the 19th century.Contents1 Engraving
Engraving
and printing early American banknotes 2 Engraving
Engraving
and printing at the U.S
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Crimean War
223,513  Ottoman Empire 45,400[2] 10,100 killed in action 10,800 died of wounds 24,500 died of disease French Empire 135,485[2] 8,490 killed in action; 11,750 died of wounds; 75,375 died of disease 39,870 wounded  British Empire 40,462[2] 2,755 killed in action 1,847 died of wounds 17,580 died of disease 18,280 wounded  Kingdom of Sardinia 2,166[2] 28 killed in action 2,138 died of disease 530,125[2] 35,671 killed in action 37,454 died of wounds 377,000 died from non-combat causes 80,000 wounded[3][4]v t eCrimean WarBalkansOltenița Sinop Cetate Calafat SilistraCaucasusKurekdere KarsNaval OperationsSuomenlinna Bomarsund PetropavlovskCrimeaAlma Sevastopol Balaclava Inkerman Eupatoria Taganrog Chernaya Malakoff Great Redan Kinburnv t eRusso-Ottoman Wars1568–70 1676–81 1686–1700 1710–11 1735–39 1768–74 1787–92 1806–12 1828–29 1853–56 1877–78 1914–18Russ
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Raft
A raft is any flat structure for support or transportation over water.[1] It is the most basic of boat design, characterized by the absence of a hull. Although there are cross-over boat types that blur this definition, rafts are usually kept afloat by using any combination of buoyant materials such as wood, sealed barrels, or inflated air chambers (such as pontoons), and are typically not propelled by an engine.[citation needed]Contents1 Human-made rafts 2 Natural rafts 3 Image gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHuman-made rafts[edit] Further information: Pre-Columbian raftsSketch by F.E. Paris (1841) showing construction of a native Peruvian balsa raftTraditional or primitive rafts were constructed of wood or reeds. Modern rafts may also use pontoons, drums, or extruded polystyrene blocks.[citation needed] Inflatable rafts use durable, multi-layered rubberized fabrics. Depending on its use and size, it may have a superstructure, masts, or rudders
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Siege Of Taganrog
The Siege of Taganrog
Taganrog
is a name given in some Russian histories to Anglo-French naval operations in the northeastern part of the Sea of Azov between June and October 1855 during the Crimean War
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Taganrog
Taganrog
Taganrog
(Russian: Таганрог, IPA: [təɡɐnˈrok]) is a port city in Rostov Oblast, Russia, on the north shore of the Taganrog Bay
Taganrog Bay
in the Sea of Azov, several kilometers west of the mouth of the Don River
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Black Sea
The Black Sea
Sea
is a body of water and marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean between the Balkans, Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Western Asia.[1] It is supplied by a number of major rivers, such as the Danube, Dnieper, Southern Bug, Dniester, Don, and the Rioni. Areas of many countries drain into the Black Sea,[2] including Austria, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Georgia, Germany, Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia,
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Admiralty
The Admiralty, originally known as the Office of the Admiralty
Admiralty
and Marine Affairs,[1] was the government department[2][3] responsible for the command of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
first in the Kingdom of England, second in the Kingdom of Great Britain, and from 1801 to 1964,[4] the United Kingdom and former British Empire
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Prototype
A prototype is an early sample, model, or release of a product built to test a concept or process or to act as a thing to be replicated or learned from.[1] It is a term used in a variety of contexts, including semantics, design, electronics, and software programming. A prototype is generally used to evaluate a new design to enhance precision by system analysts and users.[2] Prototyping serves to provide specifications for a real, working system rather than a theoretical one.[3] In some design workflow models, creating a prototype (a process sometimes called materialization) is the step between the formalization and the evaluation of an idea.[4] The word prototype derives from the Greek πρωτότυπον prototypon, "primitive form", neutral of πρωτότυπος prototypos, "original, primitive", from πρῶτος protos, "first" and τύπος typos, "impression".[1][5]Contents1 Basic prototype categories 2 Differences in creating a prototype vs
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HMS Trusty (1855)
The Aetna-class ironclad floating batteries were built during the Crimean War
Crimean War
for the attack of Russian coastal fortifications. Britain and France each laid down five of these coastal attack vessels in 1854. The French used three of their batteries in 1855 against the defences at Kinburn on the Black Sea, where they were effective against Russian shore defences
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HMS Prince Albert (1864)
HMS Prince Albert was designed and built as a shallow-draught coast-defence ship, and was the first British warship designed to carry her main armament in turrets.[1] The ship was named after Prince Albert, the late husband of Queen Victoria. At her wish Prince Albert remained on the "active" list until 1899, a total of 33 years, by which time she had long ceased to be of any military value.Contents1 Design 2 Service history 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksDesign[edit] The Board of Admiralty, in coming to decisions on the structure and dimensions of this ship, were faced with conflicting demands for stability, armour, gun-power, rig, speed and range
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French Destroyer Maillé-Brézé (D627)
Maillé-Brézé is a T 47-class destroyer
T 47-class destroyer
(escorteur d'escadre) of the French Navy. She was built by Arsenal de Lorient
Lorient
in Lorient, commissioned on 4 May 1957 and named after the French admiral Jean Armand de Maillé-Brézé (1619–1646). History[edit] On 2 March 1962, Maillé-Brézé, along with another four destroyers, landed fresh troops at Algiers
Algiers
to fight the OAS upsurge.[2] Assisted by her sister ship Surcouf, she was about to shell the OAS-held quarter of Bab-el-Oued when a counter-order called the operation off. The destroyers instead took battle stations close to the shore as a deterrent.[3] In 1988 she was decommissioned and became a museum ship in Nantes
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Albert, Prince Consort
Prince Albert of Saxe- Coburg
Coburg
and Gotha (Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emmanuel;[1] 26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria. He was born in the Saxon duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, to a family connected to many of Europe's ruling monarchs. At the age of 20, he married his first cousin, Queen Victoria; they had nine children. Initially he felt constrained by his role of consort, which did not afford him power or responsibilities. He gradually developed a reputation for supporting public causes, such as educational reform and the abolition of slavery worldwide, and was entrusted with running the Queen's household, office and estates. He was heavily involved with the organisation of the Great Exhibition of 1851, which was a resounding success. Victoria came to depend more and more on his support and guidance
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Isaac Watts (naval Architect)
Isaac Watts (1797–1876) was an early British naval architect. Together with Chief Engineer Thomas Lloyd, he designed HMS Warrior, the world's first armour-plated iron-hulled warship.[1] When he retired his position as Chief Constructor was taken by Edward Reed.[2] References[edit]^ Brown, David K. (2006). The Way of a Ship in the Midst of the Sea: The Life and Work of William Froude. Periscope Publishing Ltd. p. 113. ISBN 1904381405.  ^ Brown, David K. (2006). The Way of a Ship in the Midst of the Sea: The Life and Work of William Froude. Periscope Publishing Ltd. p. 128. ISBN 1904381405. External links[edit]ODNB entryThis military-related article is a stub
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