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Guard Rail
Guard rail
Guard rail
or guardrail, sometimes referred to as guide rail or railing, is a system designed to keep people or vehicles from (in most cases unintentionally) straying into dangerous or off-limits areas. A handrail is less restrictive than a guard rail and provides both support and the protective limitation of a boundary.Contents1 Public safety 2 Facility safety guardrail 3 Automotive safety 4 Street
Street
railings as hindrances and dangers 5 Railways 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksPublic safety[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Eiffel Tower
The Eiffel Tower
Eiffel Tower
(/ˈaɪfəl/ EYE-fəl; French: tour Eiffel [tuʁ‿ɛfɛl] ( listen)) is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars
Champ de Mars
in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower. Constructed from 1887–89 as the entrance to the 1889 World's Fair, it was initially criticized by some of France's leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but it has become a global cultural icon of France
France
and one of the most recognisable structures in the world.[3] The Eiffel Tower
Eiffel Tower
is the most-visited paid monument in the world; 6.91 million people ascended it in 2015. The tower is 324 metres (1,063 ft) tall, about the same height as an 81-storey building, and the tallest structure in Paris. Its base is square, measuring 125 metres (410 ft) on each side
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Composite Lumber
Composite lumber is a material that is a mixture of wood fiber, plastic, and some type of binding agent. These ingredients are put together to form a material that is denser, stronger, and heavier than wood alone, a wood-plastic composite.Contents1 History 2 Features 3 Advantages 4 Disadvantages4.1 Environmental Impact5 Capped composite decking 6 See also 7 References 8 Additional sourcesHistory[edit] Until the 1990s, wood was the material of choice for deck construction. However, new products, composites, began to emerge at this time. These new products offered the look and workability of wood, but they were more water resistant and required less maintenance. Over time, these lower maintenance decking options increased in popularity
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Bundesautobahn 24
Bundesautobahn 24 (translates from German as Federal Motorway 24, short form Autobahn 24, abbreviated as BAB 24 or A 24) is an autobahn in northern Germany that connects the large metropolitan regions of Hamburg and Berlin. It was one of the three transit access roads to West Berlin during the Cold War. On that road, there is a 150 km (93 mi) long section that has no speed limit at all (only a recommended speed of 130 km/h), which means that about 65% of that Autobahn can be driven at very high speed.Contents1 History 2 Exit list 3 Pictures 4 External linksHistory[edit] Planning for the autobahn began as far back as the 1930s; before World War II numerous bridges and sections of roadside shoulder were built between Hamburg and Berlin. The German divide, however, put a hold on further work and it was not until 1978 that construction was resumed, carried out by a GDR work force and paid for by West Germany. In 1982 the A 24 could finally be opened
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Cyclist
Cycling, also called bicycling or biking, is the use of bicycles for transport, recreation, exercise or sport.[1] People engaged in cycling are referred to as "cyclists",[2] "bikers",[3] or less commonly, as "bicyclists".[4] Apart from two-wheeled bicycles, "cycling" also includes the riding of unicycles, tricycles, quadracycles, recumbent and similar human-powered vehicles (HPVs). Bicycles
Bicycles
were introduced in the 19th century and now number approximately one billion worldwide.[5] They are the principal means of transportation in many parts of the world.
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Steel
Steel
Steel
is an alloy of iron and carbon and other elements. Because of its high tensile strength and low cost, it is a major component used in buildings, infrastructure, tools, ships, automobiles, machines, appliances, and weapons. Iron
Iron
is the base metal of steel. Iron
Iron
is able to take on two crystalline forms (allotropic forms), body centered cubic (BCC) and face centered cubic (FCC), depending on its temperature. In the body-centred cubic arrangement, there is an iron atom in the centre of each cube, and in the face-centred cubic, there is one at the center of each of the six faces of the cube
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Occupational Safety And Health Administration
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) is an agency of the United States Department of Labor. Congress established the agency under the Occupational Safety and Health Act, which President Richard M. Nixon signed into law on December 29, 1970. OSHA's mission is to "assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance".[2] The agency is also charged with enforcing a variety of whistleblower statutes and regulations. OSHA is currently headed by Acting Assistant Secretary of Labor Loren Sweatt
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Suicide
Suicide
Suicide
is the act of intentionally causing one's own death.[6] Risk factors include mental disorders such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, personality disorders, and substance abuse, including alcoholism and use of benzodiazepines.[2][4][7] Other suicides are impulsive acts due to stress such as from financial difficulties, troubles with relationships, or from bullying.[2][8] Those who have previously attempted suicide are at higher risk for future attempts.[2]
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Royal Borough Of Kensington And Chelsea
39.3% White British 2.3% White Irish 0.1% White Gypsy or Irish Traveller 28.9% Other White 1.1% White & Black Caribbean 0.7% White & Black African 1.9% White & Asian 2% Other Mixed 1.6% Indian 0.6% Pakistani 0.5% Bangladeshi 2.5% Chinese 4.8% Other Asian 3.5% Black African 2.1% Black Caribbean 1% Other Black 4.1% Arab 3.1% OtherTime zone GMT (UTC) • Summer (DST) BST (UTC+1)Postcodes NW, SW, WArea code(s) 020ONS code 00AWGSS code E09000020Police Metropolitan PoliceWebsite http://www.rbkc.gov.uk/The Royal Borough of Kensington
Kensington
and Chelsea (RBKC) is an inner London borough of royal status. As the smallest borough in London
London
and the second smallest district in England, it is one of the most densely populated in the United Kingdom
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Bridge
A bridge is a structure built to span physical obstacles without closing the way underneath such as a body of water, valley, or road, for the purpose of providing passage over the obstacle. There are many different designs that each serve a particular purpose and apply to different situations
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Cage (enclosure)
A cage is an enclosure often made of mesh, bars or wires, used to confine, contain or protect something or someone. A cage can serve many purposes, including keeping an animal in captivity, capturing, and being used for display of an animal at a zoo.[1]Contents1 Construction 2 Animal cages2.1 Trapping3 Human cages3.1 Punishment 3.2 Safety 3.3 Entertainment 3.4 Homes4 Engineering 5 Other uses 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksConstruction[edit] A cage does not hermetically separate the contents from external environmental influences, which is one of its most important properties. In contrast to a basket, a cage is generally closed on all sides
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Space Needle
The Space Needle
Space Needle
is an observation tower in Seattle, Washington, a landmark of the Pacific Northwest, and an icon of Seattle. It was built in the Seattle
Seattle
Center for the 1962 World's Fair, which drew over 2.3 million visitors, when nearly 20,000 people a day used its elevators. Once the tallest structure west of the Mississippi River,[7] it is 605 ft (184 m) high, 138 ft (42 m) wide, and weighs 9,550 tons. It is built to withstand winds of up to 200 miles per hour (89 m/s) and earthquakes of up to 9.1 magnitude,[8] as strong as the 1700 Cascadia earthquake
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Observation Tower
An observation tower is a structure used to view events from a long distance and to create a full 360 degree range of vision. They are usually at least 20 metres (65.6 ft) tall and made from stone, iron, and wood. Many modern towers are also used as TV towers, restaurants, or churches
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Alvar Aalto
Hugo Alvar Henrik Aalto (pronounced [ˈhuɡo ˈɑlʋɑr ˈhenrik ˈɑːlto]; 3 February 1898 – 11 May 1976) was a Finnish architect and designer.[1] His work includes architecture, furniture, textiles and glassware, as well as sculptures and paintings, though he never regarded himself as an artist, seeing painting and sculpture as "branches of the tree whose trunk is architecture."[2] Aalto's early career runs in parallel with the rapid economic growth and industrialization of Finland
Finland
during the first half of the twentieth century and many of his clients were industrialists; among these were the Ahlström-Gullichsen family.
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International Building Code
The International Building Code (IBC) is a model building code developed by the International Code Council (ICC). It has been adopted for use as a base code standard by most jurisdictions in the United States.[1][2] Elsewhere, it is also used in Abu Dhabi, the Caribbean Community, Colombia, Georgia, Honduras, Afghanistan
Afghanistan
and Saudi Arabia. The IBC addresses both health and safety concerns for buildings based upon prescriptive and performance related requirements. The IBC is fully compatible with all other published ICC codes
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