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Groton, Massachusetts
351 / 978 (978 Exchanges: 448,449)FIPS code 25-27480GNIS feature ID 0619399Website www.townofgroton.orgGroton is a town in northwestern Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 10,873 at the 2012 town census.[3] It is home to two prep schools: Groton School, founded in 1884,[4][5] and Lawrence Academy at Groton, founded in 1792 and the third-oldest private school in Massachusetts
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New England Town
New England
New England
(United States):Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island VermontFound in U.S. states in New EnglandCreated by Various colonial agreements followed by state constitutionsCreated 1620 (Plymouth, Massachusetts)Number More than 1,500 (as of 2016)Populations 41 (Hart's Location, New Hampshire) - 68,318 (Framingham, Massachusetts)Areas 1.2 sq mi. (Nahant, Massachusetts) - 291.2 sq mi. (Pittsburg, New Hampshire)Government Town meetingThis article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages)This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)This article possibly contains original research
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Algonquian Languages
The Algonquian languages
Algonquian languages
(/ælˈɡɒŋkiən/ or /ælˈɡɒŋkwiən/;[2] also Algonkian) are a subfamily of Native American languages which includes most of the languages in the Algic language family. The name of the Algonquian language family is distinguished from the orthographically similar Algonquin dialect of the indigenous Ojibwe language
Ojibwe language
(Chippewa), which is a senior member of the Algonquian language family. The term "Algonquin" has been suggested to derive from the Maliseet
Maliseet
word elakómkwik (pronounced [ɛlæˈɡomoɡwik]), "they are our relatives/allies".[3][4] A number of Algonquian languages, like many other Native American languages, are now extinct. Speakers of Algonquian languages
Algonquian languages
stretch from the east coast of North America to the Rocky Mountains
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[5][6][7] It shares land borders with Wales
Wales
to the west and Scotland
Scotland
to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
(/ˈsʌfək/) is an East Anglian county of historic origin in England. It has borders with Norfolk
Norfolk
to the north, Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the west and Essex
Essex
to the south. The North Sea
North Sea
lies to the east. The county town is Ipswich; other important towns include Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds, Newmarket and Felixstowe, one of the largest container ports in Europe.[2] The county is low-lying with very few hills, and is largely arable land with the wetlands of the Broads in the north
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Queen Anne's War
 France New France Spain New SpainWabanaki Confederacy Caughnawaga Mohawk Choctaw Timucua Apalachee Natchez England (before 1707) British America Great Britain (after 1707) British AmericaMuscogee (Creek) Chickasaw Yamasee Iroquois
Iroquois
ConfederacyCommanders and leadersJosé de Zúñiga y la Cerda Daniel d'Auger de Subercase Philippe de Rigaud Vaudreuil Father Sebastian Rale Jean-Baptiste Hertel de Rouville Joseph Dudley James Moore Francis Nicholson Hovenden Walker Benja
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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Battle Of Bunker Hill
United ColoniesConnecticut Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Great BritainCommanders and leaders William Prescott Israel Putnam Joseph Warren † John Stark William Howe Thomas Gage Sir Robert Pigot James Abercrombie † Henry Clinton Samuel Graves John Pitcairn †Strength~2,400[3] 3,000+[4]Casualties and losses115 killed, 305 wounded, 30 captured (20 POWs died) Total: 450[5] 19 officers killed 62 officers wounded 207 soldiers killed 766 soldiers wounded Total: 1,054[6]The Battle of Bunker Hill
Battle of Bunker Hill
was fought on June 17, 1775, during the Siege of Boston
Siege of Boston
in the early stages of the American Revolutionary War. The battle is named after Bunker Hill in Charlestown, Massachusetts, which was peripherally involved in the battle
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Indigenous Peoples
Indigenous peoples, also known as First peoples, Aboriginal peoples or Native peoples, are ethnic groups who are the original or earliest known inhabitants of an area, in contrast to groups that have settled, occupied or colonized the area more recently. Groups are usually described as Indigenous when they maintain traditions or other aspects of an early culture that is associated with a given region. Not all Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples
share this characteristic, as many have adopted substantial elements of a colonizing culture, such as dress, religion or language. Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples
may be settled in a given region (sedentary) or exhibit a nomadic lifestyle across a large territory, but they are generally historically associated with a specific territory on which they depend
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Nipmuc
The Nipmuc
Nipmuc
or Nipmuck people are descendants of the indigenous Algonquian peoples
Algonquian peoples
of Nippenet, 'the freshwater pond place', which corresponds to central Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and immediately adjacent portions of Connecticut
Connecticut
and Rhode Island. The tribe were first encountered by Europeans in 1630, when John Acquittamaug arrived with maize to sell to the starving colonists of Boston, Massachusetts.[5] The colonists introduced pathogens, such as smallpox, to which the Native Americans had no prior exposure. They were also exposed to alcohol for the first time, which led to huge numbers of natives succumbing to the effects of alcoholism
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Geographic Names Information System
The Geographic Names Information System
Geographic Names Information System
(GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States
United States
of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States
United States
Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States
United States
Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded
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Nashaway People
The Nashaway
Nashaway
(or Nashua or Weshacum) were a tribe of Algonquian Indians inhabiting the upstream portions of the Nashua River
Nashua River
valley in what is now the northern half of Worcester County, Massachusetts, mainly in the vicinity of Sterling, Lancaster and other towns near Mount Wachusett. They are often associated with the Nipmuc, which along with variants such as Nipmug or Nipnet was the general term for all bands inhabiting central Massachusetts
Massachusetts
away from the coastlines and ending before the Connecticut River
Connecticut River
valley. The meaning of Nashaway
Nashaway
is "river with a pebbled bottom".[1]The Nashua River
Nashua River
in Groton, MA
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Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas
The indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
are the pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas
Americas
and their descendants. Although some indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
were traditionally hunter-gatherers—and many, especially in the Amazon basin, still are—many groups practiced aquaculture and agriculture. The impact of their agricultural endowment to the world is a testament to their time and work in reshaping and cultivating the flora indigenous to the Americas.[24] Although some societies depended heavily on agriculture, others practiced a mix of farming, hunting and gathering
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English American
English Americans, also referred to as Anglo-Americans, are Americans whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England, a country that is part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In the 2014 American Community Survey, English Americans
Americans
are (7.6%) of the total population.[5] However, demographers regard this as a serious undercount, as the index of inconsistency is high and many if not most Americans
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Trading Post
A trading post, trading station, or trading house was a place or establishment where the trading of goods took place; the term is generally used, in modern parlance, in reference to such establishments in historic Northern America, although the practice long predates that continent's colonization by Europeans. The preferred travel route to a trading post or between trading posts, was known as a trade route. Trading posts were also places for people to meet and exchange the news of the world or simply the news from their home country (many of the world's trading posts were located in places which were popular destinations for emigration) in a time when not even newspapers existed. European colonialism
European colonialism
traces its roots to ancient Carthage
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Algonquian Peoples
The Algonquian are one of the most populous and widespread North American native language groups. Today, thousands of individuals identify with various Algonquian peoples. Historically, the peoples were prominent along the Atlantic Coast and into the interior along the St. Lawrence River
St. Lawrence River
and around the Great Lakes. This grouping consists of the peoples who speak Algonquian languages.A 16th-century sketch of the Algonquian village of Pomeiock.Before Europeans came into contact, most Algonquian settlements lived by hunting and fishing, although quite a few supplemented their diet by cultivating corn, beans and squash (the "Three Sisters"). The Ojibwe
Ojibwe
cultivated wild rice[citation needed]. The Algonquians of New England
New England
(who spoke the Eastern Algonquian) practiced a seasonal economy. The basic social unit was the village: a few hundred people related by a clan kinship structure
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