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Grosvenor Gallery
The Grosvenor Gallery
Grosvenor Gallery
was an art gallery in London
London
founded in 1877 by Sir Coutts Lindsay
Coutts Lindsay
and his wife Blanche. Its first directors were J. Comyns Carr and Charles Hallé. The gallery proved crucial to the Aesthetic Movement because it provided a home for those artists whose approaches the more classical and conservative Royal Academy
Royal Academy
did not welcome, such as Edward Burne-Jones
Edward Burne-Jones
and Walter Crane.[1]Contents1 History 2 Generating station 3 See also 4 Notes 5 Sources and further readingHistory[edit] Grosvenor Gallery
Grosvenor Gallery
plan 1899[1]The gallery was founded in Bond Street, London, in 1877 by Sir Coutts Lindsay and his wife Blanche. They engaged J. Comyns Carr
J. Comyns Carr
and Charles Hallé as co-directors
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The Graphic
The Graphic
The Graphic
was a British weekly illustrated newspaper, first published on 4 December 1869 by William Luson Thomas's company Illustrated Newspapers Limited. The influence of The Graphic
The Graphic
within the art world was immense, its many admirers included Vincent van Gogh, and Hubert von Herkomer.[1] It continued to be published weekly under this title until 23 April 1932 and then changed title to The National Graphic between 28 April and 14 July 1932; it then ceased publication, after 3,266 issues. From 1890 until 1926, Luson Thomas's company, H. R
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Fairleigh Dickinson University Press
Fairleigh Dickinson University
Fairleigh Dickinson University
Press (FDU Press) is a publishing house under the operation and oversight of Fairleigh Dickinson University, the largest private university in New Jersey
New Jersey
with international campuses in Vancouver, British Columbia
Vancouver, British Columbia
and Wroxton, Oxfordshire. History[edit] FDU Press was established in 1967 by the university's founder Peter Sammartino, in cooperation with the publisher Thomas Yoseloff, formerly the director of University of Pennsylvania Press
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Art Gallery
An art museum or art gallery is a building or space for the exhibition of art, usually visual art. Museums can be public or private, but what distinguishes a museum is the ownership of a collection
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Regent's Park
Regent's Park
Regent's Park
(officially The Regent's Park) is one of the Royal Parks of London
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River Thames
The River Thames
River Thames
(/tɛmz/ ( listen) TEMZ) is a river that flows through southern England, most notably through London. At 215 miles (346 km), it is the longest river entirely in England
England
and the second longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn. It also flows through Oxford
Oxford
(where it is called Isis), Reading, Henley-on-Thames
Henley-on-Thames
and Windsor. The lower reaches of the river are called the Tideway, derived from its long tidal reach up to Teddington Lock. It rises at Thames Head
Thames Head
in Gloucestershire, and flows into the North Sea
North Sea
via the Thames Estuary
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Knightsbridge
Knightsbridge
Knightsbridge
is an exclusive residential and retail district in West London,[2] south of Hyde Park. It is identified in the London Plan
London Plan
as one of two international retail centres in London, alongside the West End.[3]Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Geography 4 Economy4.1 Property4.1.1 One Hyde Park 4.1.2 History of property construction5 Crime and terrorism 6 Buildings 7 Transport 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksEtymology[edit] Knightsbridge
Knightsbridge
was historically known in Saxon and Old English as: Cnihtebricge c.1050 Knichtebrig 1235 Cnichtebrugge 13th century Knyghtesbrugg 1364, that is ‘bridge of the young men or retainers,’ from Old English cniht (genitive case plural –a) and brycg. The original bridge was where one of the old roads to the west that crossed the River Westbourne
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High Court Of Justice
The High Court is, together with the Court of Appeal
Appeal
and the Crown Court, one of the Senior Courts of England and Wales. Its name is abbreviated as EWHC for legal citation purposes. The High Court deals at first instance with all high value and high importance cases, and also has a supervisory jurisdiction over all subordinate courts and tribunals, with a few statutory exceptions. The High Court consists of three divisions: the Queen's Bench Division, the Chancery Division, and the Family Division. Their jurisdictions overlap in some cases, and cases started in one division may be transferred by court order to another where appropriate
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Sebastian Ziani De Ferranti
Sebastian Pietro Innocenzo Adhemar Ziani de Ferranti (9 April 1864 – 13 January 1930) was a British electrical engineer and inventor.Contents1 Personal life 2 Professional career 3 Patents 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksPersonal life[edit] Sebastian Ziani de Ferranti was born in Liverpool, England. His Italian father, Cesare, was a photographer (son of composer Marco Aurelio Zani de Ferranti) and his mother Juliana de Ferranti (née Scott) was a concert pianist. He was educated at Hampstead School, London; St. Augustine's College, Westgate-on-Sea; and University College London. He married Gertrude Ruth Ince on 24 April 1888 and they had seven children together. Ferranti died on 13 January 1930 in Zurich, Switzerland
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Corliss Steam Engine
A Corliss steam engine
Corliss steam engine
(or Corliss engine) is a steam engine, fitted with rotary valves and with variable valve timing patented in 1849, invented by and named after the American engineer George Henry Corliss of Providence, Rhode Island. Engines fitted with Corliss valve gear offered the best thermal efficiency of any type of stationary steam engine until the refinement of the uniflow steam engine and steam turbine in the 20th century. Corliss engines were generally about 30 percent more fuel efficient than conventional steam engines with fixed cutoff.[1] This increased efficiency made steam power more economical than water power, allowing industrial development away from millponds.[2] Corliss engines were typically used as stationary engines to provide mechanical power to line shafting in factories and mills and to drive dynamos to generate electricity
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Electrical Substation
A substation is a part of an electrical generation, transmission, and distribution system. Substations transform voltage from high to low, or the reverse, or perform any of several other important functions. Between the generating station and consumer, electric power may flow through several substations at different voltage levels. A substation may include transformers to change voltage levels between high transmission voltages and lower distribution voltages, or at the interconnection of two different transmission voltages. Substations may be owned and operated by an electrical utility, or may be owned by a large industrial or commercial customer. Generally substations are unattended, relying on SCADA
SCADA
for remote supervision and control. The word substation comes from the days before the distribution system became a grid
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Alternator
An alternator is an electrical generator that converts mechanical energy to electrical energy in the form of alternating current.[2] For reasons of cost and simplicity, most alternators use a rotating magnetic field with a stationary armature.[3] Occasionally, a linear alternator or a rotating armature with a stationary magnetic field is used. In principle, any AC electrical generator can be called an alternator, but usually the term refers to small rotating machines driven by automotive and other internal combustion engines. An alternator that uses a permanent magnet for its magnetic field is called a magneto. Alternators in power stations driven by steam turbines are called turbo-alternators
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Macmillan Publishers
Macmillan Publishers
Macmillan Publishers
Ltd (occasionally known as the Macmillan Group) is an international publishing company owned by Holtzbrinck Publishing Group. It has offices in 41 countries worldwide and operates in more than thirty others.Contents1 History1.1 Macmillan in the United States 1.2 E-books
E-books
and price fixing charges 1.3 Corruption charges2 Divisions 3 See also 4 Notes and references 5 Further reading 6 External linksHistory[edit]This logo appeared in Leslie Stephen's biography of Alexander Pope, published by Macmillan & Co in 1880.Macmillan was founded in 1843 by Daniel and Alexander Macmillan, two brothers from the Isle of Arran, Scotland
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Electricity Council
Electricity
Electricity
is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and motion of electric charge. Although initially considered a phenomenon separate from magnetism, since the development of Maxwell's equations, both are recognized as part of a single phenomenon: electromagnetism. Various common phenomena are related to electricity, including lightning, static electricity, electric heating, electric discharges and many others. The presence of an electric charge, which can be either positive or negative, produces an electric field. The movement of electric charges is an electric current and produces a magnetic field. When a charge is placed in a location with a non-zero electric field, a force will act on it. The magnitude of this force is given by Coulomb's law. Thus, if that charge were to move, the electric field would be doing work on the electric charge
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